2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182535
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
School Nursing: The Missing Link
Author(s):
Mascolo, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Mascolo, MSN, RN, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, Ohio, USA, email: kmascolo@chmca.org
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will describe how the implementation of a school nursing program housed within a large urban pediatric hospital supports the hospital's mission of advocacy, outreach, education and excellent patient care. The role of the school nurse and the hospital within the context of the Coordinated School Health model will be explained. ABSTRACT: School nursing is a very unique type of community nursing that requires autonomy and excellent nursing skills. Due to the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in 1974, there has been an incredible increase in the number of students attending public schools with chronic and special health care needs. These needs often require the skills of a School Nurse, who functions as a patient advocate, case manager and often as the primary care giver to a large population of pediatric students. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recognizes that the influx of students with special care needs into the public school system requires a paradigm shift in the way public education has traditionally been implemented. In addition, there is a growing body of research that supports the connection between health and academic success. In response to the increased needs of students, the CDC has endorsed the Coordinated School Health Model (CSH), (CDC, 2008). which incorporates eight components to ensure the success of students: health education, physical education, school health services, school nutrition services, school counseling, healthy school environment, school staff health promotion and community involvement (Marx, et al., 1998). Pediatric hospitals are in a unique position to address most of the components of the CSH Model. This pediatric hospital has implemented a very successful school health services program that is addressing the whole child and working collaboratively with seven school districts in the county providing nursing services, mental health education, health promotion, athletic training services and more to support the academic success of all students, both typically developing and those with special health care needs. The hospital has realized great benefits from these relationships including increased referrals, a direct connection to the families in its service area and the ability to provide continuity of care for patients between the hospital, home and school. This program, while having a physician medical director for support, is entirely nursing driven. Nurses are responsible for the planning, implementation and on-going management of the program including policies and procedures, program development and evaluation. REFERENCES: Centers for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Healthy Youth! Coordinated School Health Program. http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/CSHP/. Retrieved 2/2008. Marx, E., Wooley, S. and Northrop, D., (Ed.). (1998). Health is academic: A guide to coordinated school health programs. New York, New York: Teachers College Press.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSchool Nursing: The Missing Linken_GB
dc.contributor.authorMascolo, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Mascolo, MSN, RN, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, Ohio, USA, email: kmascolo@chmca.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182535-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will describe how the implementation of a school nursing program housed within a large urban pediatric hospital supports the hospital's mission of advocacy, outreach, education and excellent patient care. The role of the school nurse and the hospital within the context of the Coordinated School Health model will be explained. ABSTRACT: School nursing is a very unique type of community nursing that requires autonomy and excellent nursing skills. Due to the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in 1974, there has been an incredible increase in the number of students attending public schools with chronic and special health care needs. These needs often require the skills of a School Nurse, who functions as a patient advocate, case manager and often as the primary care giver to a large population of pediatric students. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recognizes that the influx of students with special care needs into the public school system requires a paradigm shift in the way public education has traditionally been implemented. In addition, there is a growing body of research that supports the connection between health and academic success. In response to the increased needs of students, the CDC has endorsed the Coordinated School Health Model (CSH), (CDC, 2008). which incorporates eight components to ensure the success of students: health education, physical education, school health services, school nutrition services, school counseling, healthy school environment, school staff health promotion and community involvement (Marx, et al., 1998). Pediatric hospitals are in a unique position to address most of the components of the CSH Model. This pediatric hospital has implemented a very successful school health services program that is addressing the whole child and working collaboratively with seven school districts in the county providing nursing services, mental health education, health promotion, athletic training services and more to support the academic success of all students, both typically developing and those with special health care needs. The hospital has realized great benefits from these relationships including increased referrals, a direct connection to the families in its service area and the ability to provide continuity of care for patients between the hospital, home and school. This program, while having a physician medical director for support, is entirely nursing driven. Nurses are responsible for the planning, implementation and on-going management of the program including policies and procedures, program development and evaluation. REFERENCES: Centers for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Healthy Youth! Coordinated School Health Program. http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/CSHP/. Retrieved 2/2008. Marx, E., Wooley, S. and Northrop, D., (Ed.). (1998). Health is academic: A guide to coordinated school health programs. New York, New York: Teachers College Press.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:28:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:28:36Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.