2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182536
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of a Level III Trauma Center in a Rural Community
Author(s):
Mason, Elaine; Kratz, Ann; Reynolds, Lynn
Author Details:
Elaine Mason, BSN, RN, ENPC, Aurora Medical Center: Washington County, Hartford, Wisconsin, USA, email: ann.kratz@aurora.org; Ann Kratz, MSN, RN, APRN-BC, AP; Lynn Reynolds, RN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Traumatic injury is the leading cause of death in the first four decades of life. Research provides evidence of the effectiveness of trauma centers in decreasing mortality and morbidity. Interdisciplinary collaboration resulted in successful implementation of a Level III Trauma Center at rural community hospital. ABSTRACT: Background and Significance: The development of improved trauma care throughout the United States has been an important initiative in healthcare during the past several years. Traumatic injury, both accidental and intentional, is the leading cause of death in the first four decades of life, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Research provides evidence of the effectiveness of trauma and EMS systems in reducing mortality, morbidity, and lost productivity from traumatic injuries. From 2002 to 2006 712 hospitals nationwide had obtained trauma designation with 50 of those hospitals designated as Level III centers. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop a Level III Trauma Center in a Magnet recognized 71-bed Rural Community Hospital while maintaining fiscal responsibility. Sample/Setting: The setting is a Magnet recognized community hospital that serves a two county area that provides emergency care for both rural and urban populations. The sample includes all trauma patients entering the emergency department room at this community hospital for the past two years. Methodology: The evidence-based literature was reviewed and an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement a plan to become a Level III trauma center. Retrospective chart review, concurrent chart review including qualitative data was utilized in a continuous quality improvement design. The retrospective chart review revealed areas of improvement. A standard charting documentation form was formulated. Education and competency was obtained following the chart review. Evidence-based interventions and educational follow-up were implemented as result of concurrent chart review. Results: There has been a successful implementation of a Level III trauma center in a community hospital with limited resources. The interdisciplinary team continues to meet monthly and conduct continuous quality improvement activities related to every trauma case entering the emergency department. Conclusions/Implications: Interdisciplinary collaboration and continuous quality improvement was successful in the implementation of a level III trauma center in a rural community. These results could be replicated in other hospitals seeking to attain level III trauma designation. Through the quality improvement activities we will continue to improve efficiencies related to the care of trauma patients. REFERENCES: Abernathy JH, McGwin G Jr., Acker JE, et al. Impact of a voluntary trauma system on mortality, length of stay, and cost at a level I trauma center. Am Surg. 2002;68:182û192. American Trauma Society. Appendix BûHistorical Overview of Trauma System Development (from the Trauma System Agenda for the Future). Washington DC: US Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2002. Boyd CR, Tolson MA, Copes WS. Evaluating trauma care: The TRISS method. J Trauma. 1987;27:370û378. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics Web site. Available at Http://www.cdc/nchs/death.htm Accessibility verified January 7, 2008. Champion HR, Copes RH, Sacco WJ, et al. The major trauma outcome study: Establishing national norms for trauma care. J Trauma. 1990;30:1356û1365. Committee on Injury Prevention and Control, Institute of Medicine. Reducing the Burden of Injury: Advancing Prevention and Treatment. National Academy Press, Washington DC: 1999. Committee on Trauma Blue Book a Guide to Organization Objectives and Activities 2007. http://www.dhfs.state.wi.us/ems/Trauma/index.htm Accessibility verified January 7, 2008. Engelhardt S, Hoyt D, Coimbra R, Fortlage D, Holbrook T. The 15-year evolution of an urban trauma center: what does the future hold for the trauma surgeon? J Trauma. 2001;51:633û638. Hoyt D. Presidential Address, American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. J Trauma. 2004;56:1û6. MacKenzie EJ. Review of evidence regarding trauma system effectiveness resulting from panel studies. J Trauma. 1999;47 Mann NC, Cahn RM, Mullins RJ, et al. Survival among injured geriatric patients during construction of a statewide trauma system. J Trauma. 2001;50:1111û1116. Mann NC, Mullins RJ, MacKenzie EJ, Jurkovich GJ, Mock, CN. A systemic review of published evidence regarding trauma system effectiveness. J Trauma, 1999; 47(3 Suppl):S25-33. Melton SM, McGwin G, Abernathy JH, et al. Motor vehicle crash-related mortality is associated with prehospital and hospital-based resource availability. J Trauma. 2003; 54:273-279. Meredith JW, Kilgo PD, Osler T. A fresh set of survival risk ratios derived from incidents in the national trauma data bank from which the ICISS may be calculated. J Trauma. 2003; 55:924û932. Meredith JW, Kilgo PD, Osler T. Independently derived survival risk ratios yield better estimates of survival than traditional survival risk ratios when using the ICISS. J Trauma. 2003; 55:933û938. Pryor JP, Dabrowski GP, Reilly PM, Grossman MD. Non-operative management of penetrating trauma. Ann Emerg Med. 2004; 43:344û353. Rainer TH, de Villiers-Smit P. Trauma Systems and Emergency Medicine. Emer Med. 2003; 15:11û17 Reilly JJ, Chin B, Berkowitz J, et al. Use of a state-wide administrative database in assessing a regional trauma system: the New York City experience. J Am Coll Surg. 2004; 198:509û518. Rogers FB, Osler TM, Shackford SR, et al. Population-based study of hospital trauma care in a rural state without a formal trauma system. J Trauma. 2001;50:409û413. Trauma Programs. http://www.facs.org/trauma/index.html Accessibility verified January 30, 2008. Wisconsin Trauma Care System. http://www.wisconsintraumacare.org/rtacLinks.html Accessibility verified January 30, 2008.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of a Level III Trauma Center in a Rural Communityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMason, Elaineen_US
dc.contributor.authorKratz, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Lynnen_US
dc.author.detailsElaine Mason, BSN, RN, ENPC, Aurora Medical Center: Washington County, Hartford, Wisconsin, USA, email: ann.kratz@aurora.org; Ann Kratz, MSN, RN, APRN-BC, AP; Lynn Reynolds, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182536-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Traumatic injury is the leading cause of death in the first four decades of life. Research provides evidence of the effectiveness of trauma centers in decreasing mortality and morbidity. Interdisciplinary collaboration resulted in successful implementation of a Level III Trauma Center at rural community hospital. ABSTRACT: Background and Significance: The development of improved trauma care throughout the United States has been an important initiative in healthcare during the past several years. Traumatic injury, both accidental and intentional, is the leading cause of death in the first four decades of life, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. Research provides evidence of the effectiveness of trauma and EMS systems in reducing mortality, morbidity, and lost productivity from traumatic injuries. From 2002 to 2006 712 hospitals nationwide had obtained trauma designation with 50 of those hospitals designated as Level III centers. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop a Level III Trauma Center in a Magnet recognized 71-bed Rural Community Hospital while maintaining fiscal responsibility. Sample/Setting: The setting is a Magnet recognized community hospital that serves a two county area that provides emergency care for both rural and urban populations. The sample includes all trauma patients entering the emergency department room at this community hospital for the past two years. Methodology: The evidence-based literature was reviewed and an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement a plan to become a Level III trauma center. Retrospective chart review, concurrent chart review including qualitative data was utilized in a continuous quality improvement design. The retrospective chart review revealed areas of improvement. A standard charting documentation form was formulated. Education and competency was obtained following the chart review. Evidence-based interventions and educational follow-up were implemented as result of concurrent chart review. Results: There has been a successful implementation of a Level III trauma center in a community hospital with limited resources. The interdisciplinary team continues to meet monthly and conduct continuous quality improvement activities related to every trauma case entering the emergency department. Conclusions/Implications: Interdisciplinary collaboration and continuous quality improvement was successful in the implementation of a level III trauma center in a rural community. These results could be replicated in other hospitals seeking to attain level III trauma designation. Through the quality improvement activities we will continue to improve efficiencies related to the care of trauma patients. REFERENCES: Abernathy JH, McGwin G Jr., Acker JE, et al. Impact of a voluntary trauma system on mortality, length of stay, and cost at a level I trauma center. Am Surg. 2002;68:182û192. American Trauma Society. Appendix BûHistorical Overview of Trauma System Development (from the Trauma System Agenda for the Future). Washington DC: US Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2002. Boyd CR, Tolson MA, Copes WS. Evaluating trauma care: The TRISS method. J Trauma. 1987;27:370û378. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics Web site. Available at Http://www.cdc/nchs/death.htm Accessibility verified January 7, 2008. Champion HR, Copes RH, Sacco WJ, et al. The major trauma outcome study: Establishing national norms for trauma care. J Trauma. 1990;30:1356û1365. Committee on Injury Prevention and Control, Institute of Medicine. Reducing the Burden of Injury: Advancing Prevention and Treatment. National Academy Press, Washington DC: 1999. Committee on Trauma Blue Book a Guide to Organization Objectives and Activities 2007. http://www.dhfs.state.wi.us/ems/Trauma/index.htm Accessibility verified January 7, 2008. Engelhardt S, Hoyt D, Coimbra R, Fortlage D, Holbrook T. The 15-year evolution of an urban trauma center: what does the future hold for the trauma surgeon? J Trauma. 2001;51:633û638. Hoyt D. Presidential Address, American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. J Trauma. 2004;56:1û6. MacKenzie EJ. Review of evidence regarding trauma system effectiveness resulting from panel studies. J Trauma. 1999;47 Mann NC, Cahn RM, Mullins RJ, et al. Survival among injured geriatric patients during construction of a statewide trauma system. J Trauma. 2001;50:1111û1116. Mann NC, Mullins RJ, MacKenzie EJ, Jurkovich GJ, Mock, CN. A systemic review of published evidence regarding trauma system effectiveness. J Trauma, 1999; 47(3 Suppl):S25-33. Melton SM, McGwin G, Abernathy JH, et al. Motor vehicle crash-related mortality is associated with prehospital and hospital-based resource availability. J Trauma. 2003; 54:273-279. Meredith JW, Kilgo PD, Osler T. A fresh set of survival risk ratios derived from incidents in the national trauma data bank from which the ICISS may be calculated. J Trauma. 2003; 55:924û932. Meredith JW, Kilgo PD, Osler T. Independently derived survival risk ratios yield better estimates of survival than traditional survival risk ratios when using the ICISS. J Trauma. 2003; 55:933û938. Pryor JP, Dabrowski GP, Reilly PM, Grossman MD. Non-operative management of penetrating trauma. Ann Emerg Med. 2004; 43:344û353. Rainer TH, de Villiers-Smit P. Trauma Systems and Emergency Medicine. Emer Med. 2003; 15:11û17 Reilly JJ, Chin B, Berkowitz J, et al. Use of a state-wide administrative database in assessing a regional trauma system: the New York City experience. J Am Coll Surg. 2004; 198:509û518. Rogers FB, Osler TM, Shackford SR, et al. Population-based study of hospital trauma care in a rural state without a formal trauma system. J Trauma. 2001;50:409û413. Trauma Programs. http://www.facs.org/trauma/index.html Accessibility verified January 30, 2008. Wisconsin Trauma Care System. http://www.wisconsintraumacare.org/rtacLinks.html Accessibility verified January 30, 2008.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:28:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:28:38Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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