2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182540
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Heel Your Pain - Helping the NICU Nurse's Feet
Author(s):
McEver, Michele; Fanning, Linda; Dobbs, Nancy; Parker, Gary
Author Details:
Michele McEver, BSN, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: michele.mcever@mercy.net; Linda Fanning, MS, BSN; Nancy Dobbs, BS, RN, CWOCN; Gary Parker, PhD, MS, BSN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Background: Day in and day out, nurse's feet literally take a beating. The NICU is not immune to this problem. Having to work on a hard concrete floor for 8 - 12 hours a day, many of the Nurses in the NICU work through the pain in their feet. However as time goes by, some Nurses are unable to tolerate the pain and are forced to take time off from work or in the worst case, have surgery on their feet. The NICU staff nurses wanted to do something about this problem they identified. With the support of nursing administration and the NICU Manager, staff nurses from the NICU used the Iowa model to guide them in their quest. The literature review revealed there was not a sufficient research base available on this topic. After consulting with orthotic experts, the NICU decided to conduct their own trial. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if by wearing specialty shoes equipped with a built in orthotic and rigid arch, would it help the NICU nurses have fewer incidents of pain in their feet while at work. Method: After receiving IRB approval, the NICU nurses who meet the study inclusion criteria were consented. Each was then given a copy of the Foot Function Index (FFI) to collect baseline scores of their foot pain. The FFI is a self reported measure of pain, function, and activity associated with foot dysfunction. The FFI has a 95% confidence interval, a Cronback Alpha score of 0.94 and Intraclass correlation score of 0.87. After the baseline FFI test was given, an Orthotic expert examined and fit the nurse's feet for the specialty shoes. After the nurses received the shoes, the FFI was given 90 days later and a follow up FFI was given 90 after last date (twice over a 6 month time period once shoes were received). Results: The FFI was found to be an easily administered instrument that provided a practical method of measuring the nurse's foot pain. The data analysis revealed that by wearing the specialty shoes while working, the NICU nurses who...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.]
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHeel Your Pain - Helping the NICU Nurse's Feeten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcEver, Micheleen_US
dc.contributor.authorFanning, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDobbs, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorParker, Garyen_US
dc.author.detailsMichele McEver, BSN, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: michele.mcever@mercy.net; Linda Fanning, MS, BSN; Nancy Dobbs, BS, RN, CWOCN; Gary Parker, PhD, MS, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182540-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Background: Day in and day out, nurse's feet literally take a beating. The NICU is not immune to this problem. Having to work on a hard concrete floor for 8 - 12 hours a day, many of the Nurses in the NICU work through the pain in their feet. However as time goes by, some Nurses are unable to tolerate the pain and are forced to take time off from work or in the worst case, have surgery on their feet. The NICU staff nurses wanted to do something about this problem they identified. With the support of nursing administration and the NICU Manager, staff nurses from the NICU used the Iowa model to guide them in their quest. The literature review revealed there was not a sufficient research base available on this topic. After consulting with orthotic experts, the NICU decided to conduct their own trial. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if by wearing specialty shoes equipped with a built in orthotic and rigid arch, would it help the NICU nurses have fewer incidents of pain in their feet while at work. Method: After receiving IRB approval, the NICU nurses who meet the study inclusion criteria were consented. Each was then given a copy of the Foot Function Index (FFI) to collect baseline scores of their foot pain. The FFI is a self reported measure of pain, function, and activity associated with foot dysfunction. The FFI has a 95% confidence interval, a Cronback Alpha score of 0.94 and Intraclass correlation score of 0.87. After the baseline FFI test was given, an Orthotic expert examined and fit the nurse's feet for the specialty shoes. After the nurses received the shoes, the FFI was given 90 days later and a follow up FFI was given 90 after last date (twice over a 6 month time period once shoes were received). Results: The FFI was found to be an easily administered instrument that provided a practical method of measuring the nurse's foot pain. The data analysis revealed that by wearing the specialty shoes while working, the NICU nurses who...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:28:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:28:49Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.