2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182546
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring for Magnet: Tracking Your Progress
Author(s):
Merrill, Katreena Collette; Call, Ana Seriine; Eves, Ann; Paletta, Lisa A.
Author Details:
Katreena Collette Merrill, RN, BS, Nursing Administration, Intermountain Healthcare Urban South Region, Provo, Utah, USA; Ana Seriine Call, RN, BS, Womens Center; Ann Eves, RN, BS, MPA, Nursing Administration; Lisa A. Paletta, RN, BS, MPA, Nursing Administration, Intermountain Healthcare Orem Community
Abstract:
Presentation: We set out in 2004 on our journey towards magnet recognition. We conducted a gap analysis and identified baseline measurements in the following areas: 1. Perception of magnet recognition; 2. Nursing leadership visibility; 3. Professional Development; and 4. Image of Nursing. Our aim was to use measurements to identify our progress along the magnet journey. An initial baseline perception of magnet survey was conducted. A random telephone survey of 470 staff nurses was completed. 82% of the nurses were familiar with Magnet Recognition, 84% believed that Magnet Recognition is valuable to nursing and would have a positive impact on their department. Results from the post survey being conducted in February 2008 are pending. Baseline scores of nursing satisfaction with leadership indicated that 63% of our departments scored below the NDNQI national lower confidence limit with only 7% in the upper quartile. Efforts concentrated on improving visibility leadership, decision making and autonomy. In 2007, 15% scored below the lower quartile and 52% scored above the upper quartile (p< 0.05). Professional development was measured by number of nurses who were certified, in school and used tuition reimbursement. In 2004, less than 50 nurses were certified. We increase our tuition reimbursement and changed our policy to pay for professional certification. In 2006, 354 used tuition reimbursement amounting to almost $600,000, 30% of nursing staff is in school, 13% percent obtaining graduate degrees and over 140 have been certification with many more planned in 2008. To measure image of nursing, we surveyed 404 non nurses in the hospital. The questions, "do nurses treat you with the proper amount of respect" 72% responded 4 or 5 (1-5 scale). However, 5% responded 1 or 'no respect'. A campaign was launched that included nurses recognizing non nursing departments. The survey was repeated results obtained from 221 non-nursing employees. 27 percent of those who responded indicated that relationships have improved, 68 % scored 4 or 5 on 'nurses treat you with proper respect'. The percent rating 1 or "no respect" decreased from 5.0 percent to 0.9 percent. Conclusions: Measuring the success of the magnet journey helps focus improvement efforts and provides essential information to nursing leadership and key decision makers. Measuring for magnet helps the entire hospital engage in the journey towards excellence in patient care. REFERENCES: National Database for Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) www.nursingquality.org
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring for Magnet: Tracking Your Progressen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMerrill, Katreena Colletteen_US
dc.contributor.authorCall, Ana Seriineen_US
dc.contributor.authorEves, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaletta, Lisa A.en_US
dc.author.detailsKatreena Collette Merrill, RN, BS, Nursing Administration, Intermountain Healthcare Urban South Region, Provo, Utah, USA; Ana Seriine Call, RN, BS, Womens Center; Ann Eves, RN, BS, MPA, Nursing Administration; Lisa A. Paletta, RN, BS, MPA, Nursing Administration, Intermountain Healthcare Orem Communityen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182546-
dc.description.abstractPresentation: We set out in 2004 on our journey towards magnet recognition. We conducted a gap analysis and identified baseline measurements in the following areas: 1. Perception of magnet recognition; 2. Nursing leadership visibility; 3. Professional Development; and 4. Image of Nursing. Our aim was to use measurements to identify our progress along the magnet journey. An initial baseline perception of magnet survey was conducted. A random telephone survey of 470 staff nurses was completed. 82% of the nurses were familiar with Magnet Recognition, 84% believed that Magnet Recognition is valuable to nursing and would have a positive impact on their department. Results from the post survey being conducted in February 2008 are pending. Baseline scores of nursing satisfaction with leadership indicated that 63% of our departments scored below the NDNQI national lower confidence limit with only 7% in the upper quartile. Efforts concentrated on improving visibility leadership, decision making and autonomy. In 2007, 15% scored below the lower quartile and 52% scored above the upper quartile (p&lt; 0.05). Professional development was measured by number of nurses who were certified, in school and used tuition reimbursement. In 2004, less than 50 nurses were certified. We increase our tuition reimbursement and changed our policy to pay for professional certification. In 2006, 354 used tuition reimbursement amounting to almost $600,000, 30% of nursing staff is in school, 13% percent obtaining graduate degrees and over 140 have been certification with many more planned in 2008. To measure image of nursing, we surveyed 404 non nurses in the hospital. The questions, "do nurses treat you with the proper amount of respect" 72% responded 4 or 5 (1-5 scale). However, 5% responded 1 or 'no respect'. A campaign was launched that included nurses recognizing non nursing departments. The survey was repeated results obtained from 221 non-nursing employees. 27 percent of those who responded indicated that relationships have improved, 68 % scored 4 or 5 on 'nurses treat you with proper respect'. The percent rating 1 or "no respect" decreased from 5.0 percent to 0.9 percent. Conclusions: Measuring the success of the magnet journey helps focus improvement efforts and provides essential information to nursing leadership and key decision makers. Measuring for magnet helps the entire hospital engage in the journey towards excellence in patient care. REFERENCES: National Database for Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) www.nursingquality.orgen_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:29:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:29:04Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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