2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182550
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transparent Classification: Improving Documentation and Saving Time
Author(s):
Morrow, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Morrow, RN, MSN, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Macon, Georgia, USA, email: morrow.linda@mccg.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: At a 600 bed teaching hospital in the Southeast, we have utilized a national patient classification and staffing system for many years. It has been instrumental in benchmarking ratios and skill mix and in justifying additional nurses to care for increasing patient acuity and new services. Over the years, nurses have asked for more timely and accurate methods of classification and leadership has responded by evolving from paper to computer based scanning. Until recently, to classify a patient, nurses had to individually select unit-specific critical indicators that reflected patient's care needs. Even on computer, this required each nurse to enter the system and individually mark each patient. Time spent on each unit was an average of 1.0-1.5 hours daily, which reduced satisfaction of nurses who wanted to spend more time at the bedside rather than performing redundant charting. With goals of decreasing nonessential charting and improved timeliness and accuracy of documentation, nursing leadership conducted "best practices" calls and literature review and found a solution with our acuity vendor. We collaborated with them to serve as an alpha testing site for "transparent" classification. During this process we integrated our Electronic Medical Record (EMR) with our acuity classification system. Nurses at the bedside were involved in all aspects of this project as were Nursing Informatics, IT, Medical Records and other departments as we adjusted the EMR to include the classification criteria. In order to measure nurse satisfaction and perception with documentation and classification as well as to measure actual improvements in documentation, we conducted both qualitative and quantitative research. All levels of nurses from bedside to CNO were involved every step of the way from education to piloting to educating to implementing and making improvements. Over a period of two years, we have incrementally implemented this process; now as nurses document in the[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Aiken, L.H., Clarke, S.P., Sloane, D.M., Sochalski, J.A., Busse, R., Clarke, H., Giovannetti, P., Hunt, J., Rafferty, A.M., & Shamian, J.(2001), Nurses' Reports on Hospital Care in Five Counties. Health Affairs, 20(3), 43-53. Aiken, L.H. (2003), Nurse Staffing and the Quality of Patient care. Medscape Nurses, 5(1), 2003. Atencio, B., Cohen, C., & Gorenberg, B. (2003), Nurse Retention: Is It Worth it? Nursing Economics, 21(6), 262-268, 299. Claudio, T. (2004), Questioning Workload Resources. Nursing Management, 35(10), 31-24. Curtain, L., Dinemman, J., Krovner, K., Mancini, M., Mazella, C., Montgomery, K., Shinduhl-Rothschild, J., Sovie, M., Verran, J.,et al. (1999), Principles for Safe Nurse Staffing. ANA Publication.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransparent Classification: Improving Documentation and Saving Timeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMorrow, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Morrow, RN, MSN, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Macon, Georgia, USA, email: morrow.linda@mccg.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182550-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: At a 600 bed teaching hospital in the Southeast, we have utilized a national patient classification and staffing system for many years. It has been instrumental in benchmarking ratios and skill mix and in justifying additional nurses to care for increasing patient acuity and new services. Over the years, nurses have asked for more timely and accurate methods of classification and leadership has responded by evolving from paper to computer based scanning. Until recently, to classify a patient, nurses had to individually select unit-specific critical indicators that reflected patient's care needs. Even on computer, this required each nurse to enter the system and individually mark each patient. Time spent on each unit was an average of 1.0-1.5 hours daily, which reduced satisfaction of nurses who wanted to spend more time at the bedside rather than performing redundant charting. With goals of decreasing nonessential charting and improved timeliness and accuracy of documentation, nursing leadership conducted "best practices" calls and literature review and found a solution with our acuity vendor. We collaborated with them to serve as an alpha testing site for "transparent" classification. During this process we integrated our Electronic Medical Record (EMR) with our acuity classification system. Nurses at the bedside were involved in all aspects of this project as were Nursing Informatics, IT, Medical Records and other departments as we adjusted the EMR to include the classification criteria. In order to measure nurse satisfaction and perception with documentation and classification as well as to measure actual improvements in documentation, we conducted both qualitative and quantitative research. All levels of nurses from bedside to CNO were involved every step of the way from education to piloting to educating to implementing and making improvements. Over a period of two years, we have incrementally implemented this process; now as nurses document in the[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Aiken, L.H., Clarke, S.P., Sloane, D.M., Sochalski, J.A., Busse, R., Clarke, H., Giovannetti, P., Hunt, J., Rafferty, A.M., & Shamian, J.(2001), Nurses' Reports on Hospital Care in Five Counties. Health Affairs, 20(3), 43-53. Aiken, L.H. (2003), Nurse Staffing and the Quality of Patient care. Medscape Nurses, 5(1), 2003. Atencio, B., Cohen, C., & Gorenberg, B. (2003), Nurse Retention: Is It Worth it? Nursing Economics, 21(6), 262-268, 299. Claudio, T. (2004), Questioning Workload Resources. Nursing Management, 35(10), 31-24. Curtain, L., Dinemman, J., Krovner, K., Mancini, M., Mazella, C., Montgomery, K., Shinduhl-Rothschild, J., Sovie, M., Verran, J.,et al. (1999), Principles for Safe Nurse Staffing. ANA Publication.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:29:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:29:14Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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