2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182553
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Addiction in Nursing: Administrative and Personal Perspectives
Author(s):
Nobiling, Heidi; Starr, Deb; Willoughby, Catherine
Author Details:
Heidi Nobiling, RN, MA, MBA, CNAA-BC, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USA, email: heidi-nobiling@uiowa.edu; Deb Starr; Catherine Willoughby, RN, MA, CNA-BC
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This presentation will provide a history of addiction in nurses, including insight and perspectives shared by recovering nurses through interviews and conversations with the co-presenters. Actions that the CNO and others must take to support addicted nurses through recovery and continued successful employment will be emphasized. ABSTRACT: In about 1900, nurses were noted to be disproportionately affected by addiction. The stressful working conditions of nurses and the access to drugs in the work environment were considered to be contributing factors. (1) In 1982, the American Nurses Association (ANA) acknowledged addiction as an issue in nursing and encouraged treatment prior to discipline. (2) In 2002, the ANA adopted a resolution encouraging states to take non-punitive approaches. (3) Over the same time period, much has been learned about the neurobiology of addiction. It is difficult to determine the prevalence of addiction in nurses and estimates vary widely. (4) Most states in the US provide addicted nurses with access to programs that provide alternatives to discipline (ATD). ATD are defined as alternatives to loss of job and loss of nursing license, rather than as alternatives to legal consequences if a crime has been committed. (5) Nurses can have high recovery rates from addiction, and can return to work and practice safely with appropriate treatment and monitoring. (6) The CNO and other leaders have agreed that our organization will consistently use the ATD approach for addicted nurses, provided the nurses retain their licenses and are deemed by their treating practitioners to be able to meet job requirements. The Board of Nursing supports the use of this approach despite the lack of a formal ATD program in our state at the present time. In 2007, the CNO used this ATD approach, and the body of evidence about addicted nurses and their potential for successful recovery, to guide her decision-making when a staff nurse admitted addiction to a controlled substance. A case study of this situation will describe the actions that the CNO and other nursing leaders took to assure the nurse's successful continued employment as an RN in our organization. Elements of a return to work agreement for addicted nurses will be shared to give attendees a practical guide to use when dealing with similar situations in their own settings. In the final portion of our presentation, the staff nurse from the case study will share a highly moving and personal account of her experience as a recovering nurse. She will provide a unique perspective on hope and healing, and will also share her suggestions for actions nursing leaders and staff nurses can take to prevent addiction in other nurses, and to support those nurses that do have addictions as they journey towards recovery. REFERENCES: 1. Heise, B. (2003). The historical context of addiction in the nursing profession: 1850-1982. Journal of Addictions Nursing, 14, 117-124. 2. American Nurses Association. (1982). Action on alcohol and drug misuse and psychological dysfunctions among nurses. Resolution #5. Kansas City, MO: Author. 3. American Nurses Association. (2002). Reaffirming the profession's response to the problem of addictions and psychological dysfunctions in nursing. Resolution. Philadelphia, PA: Author. 4. Hughes, T.L., Howard, M. J., & Henry, D. (2002). Nurses' use of alcohol and other drugs: findings from a national probability sample. Substance Use and Misuse, 37, 1423-1440. 5. Haack, M.R. & Yocum, C.J. (2002). State policies and nurses with substance use disorders. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 34(1), 89-94. 6. Darbro, N. (2005). Alternative diversion programs for nurses with impaired practice: Completers and non-completers. Journal of Addictions Nursing, 16, 169-182.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAddiction in Nursing: Administrative and Personal Perspectivesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNobiling, Heidien_US
dc.contributor.authorStarr, Deben_US
dc.contributor.authorWilloughby, Catherineen_US
dc.author.detailsHeidi Nobiling, RN, MA, MBA, CNAA-BC, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USA, email: heidi-nobiling@uiowa.edu; Deb Starr; Catherine Willoughby, RN, MA, CNA-BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182553-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This presentation will provide a history of addiction in nurses, including insight and perspectives shared by recovering nurses through interviews and conversations with the co-presenters. Actions that the CNO and others must take to support addicted nurses through recovery and continued successful employment will be emphasized. ABSTRACT: In about 1900, nurses were noted to be disproportionately affected by addiction. The stressful working conditions of nurses and the access to drugs in the work environment were considered to be contributing factors. (1) In 1982, the American Nurses Association (ANA) acknowledged addiction as an issue in nursing and encouraged treatment prior to discipline. (2) In 2002, the ANA adopted a resolution encouraging states to take non-punitive approaches. (3) Over the same time period, much has been learned about the neurobiology of addiction. It is difficult to determine the prevalence of addiction in nurses and estimates vary widely. (4) Most states in the US provide addicted nurses with access to programs that provide alternatives to discipline (ATD). ATD are defined as alternatives to loss of job and loss of nursing license, rather than as alternatives to legal consequences if a crime has been committed. (5) Nurses can have high recovery rates from addiction, and can return to work and practice safely with appropriate treatment and monitoring. (6) The CNO and other leaders have agreed that our organization will consistently use the ATD approach for addicted nurses, provided the nurses retain their licenses and are deemed by their treating practitioners to be able to meet job requirements. The Board of Nursing supports the use of this approach despite the lack of a formal ATD program in our state at the present time. In 2007, the CNO used this ATD approach, and the body of evidence about addicted nurses and their potential for successful recovery, to guide her decision-making when a staff nurse admitted addiction to a controlled substance. A case study of this situation will describe the actions that the CNO and other nursing leaders took to assure the nurse's successful continued employment as an RN in our organization. Elements of a return to work agreement for addicted nurses will be shared to give attendees a practical guide to use when dealing with similar situations in their own settings. In the final portion of our presentation, the staff nurse from the case study will share a highly moving and personal account of her experience as a recovering nurse. She will provide a unique perspective on hope and healing, and will also share her suggestions for actions nursing leaders and staff nurses can take to prevent addiction in other nurses, and to support those nurses that do have addictions as they journey towards recovery. REFERENCES: 1. Heise, B. (2003). The historical context of addiction in the nursing profession: 1850-1982. Journal of Addictions Nursing, 14, 117-124. 2. American Nurses Association. (1982). Action on alcohol and drug misuse and psychological dysfunctions among nurses. Resolution #5. Kansas City, MO: Author. 3. American Nurses Association. (2002). Reaffirming the profession's response to the problem of addictions and psychological dysfunctions in nursing. Resolution. Philadelphia, PA: Author. 4. Hughes, T.L., Howard, M. J., & Henry, D. (2002). Nurses' use of alcohol and other drugs: findings from a national probability sample. Substance Use and Misuse, 37, 1423-1440. 5. Haack, M.R. & Yocum, C.J. (2002). State policies and nurses with substance use disorders. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 34(1), 89-94. 6. Darbro, N. (2005). Alternative diversion programs for nurses with impaired practice: Completers and non-completers. Journal of Addictions Nursing, 16, 169-182.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:29:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:29:22Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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