2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182554
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementing a Patient/Family-Activated Emergency Response
Author(s):
Norman, Vivian; Bogert, Soudi; Ferrell, Carmen
Author Details:
Vivian Norman, RN, MSN, CCRN, St. Joseph Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: Vivian.Norman@stjoe.org; Soudi Bogert, RN, BSN; Carmen Ferrell, RN, MSN, CCRN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: A reported 98,000 people die from medical errors annually, making it the fourth largest cause of death in the U.S. each year. To proactively address system processes and improve delivery of care, we instituted a mechanism to empower patients/families to access a previously established emergency response team. In 2004, our large non-profit community hospital initiated Medical Emergency Team (MET) and we now offer "Condition H (HELP)," a patient/family-initiated emergency response team. When activated, an expert multidisciplinary team responds to an emergent situation to assess and address patient/family needs. We launched "Save A Life" campaign throughout the hospital promoting MET and Condition H (pilot on Medical Respiratory Unit). We educated staff, encouraged MET activation, promoted the new patient/family program. Staff who initiate a MET call are recognized as those who "Save A Life." We rallied all disciplines. A mobile education cart was used to gain staff involvement. A vital part of this roll out involved a DVD of Josie King's mother who related the story of medical errors and a breakdown in communication among healthcare workers that lead to the death of her 18 month-old daughter. Sharing Josie's story with staff helped them understand the program's purpose. Brochures are given to patients on admission about the program and how to utilize it. A grid with role responsibilities, process algorithm, documentation form, and operator tree were created with multidisciplinary involvement. Surveys assess patients/families' understanding and reaction to having Condition H available. Most evaluated are aware of the program and have an adequate understanding. They report feeling more secure and safe knowing Condition H is available. Mock drills have been conducted to help us move toward hospital-wide implementation. At this time, we have yet to receive our first call (which we interpret as a good outcome).
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementing a Patient/Family-Activated Emergency Responseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNorman, Vivianen_US
dc.contributor.authorBogert, Soudien_US
dc.contributor.authorFerrell, Carmenen_US
dc.author.detailsVivian Norman, RN, MSN, CCRN, St. Joseph Hospital, Orange, California, USA, email: Vivian.Norman@stjoe.org; Soudi Bogert, RN, BSN; Carmen Ferrell, RN, MSN, CCRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182554-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: A reported 98,000 people die from medical errors annually, making it the fourth largest cause of death in the U.S. each year. To proactively address system processes and improve delivery of care, we instituted a mechanism to empower patients/families to access a previously established emergency response team. In 2004, our large non-profit community hospital initiated Medical Emergency Team (MET) and we now offer "Condition H (HELP)," a patient/family-initiated emergency response team. When activated, an expert multidisciplinary team responds to an emergent situation to assess and address patient/family needs. We launched "Save A Life" campaign throughout the hospital promoting MET and Condition H (pilot on Medical Respiratory Unit). We educated staff, encouraged MET activation, promoted the new patient/family program. Staff who initiate a MET call are recognized as those who "Save A Life." We rallied all disciplines. A mobile education cart was used to gain staff involvement. A vital part of this roll out involved a DVD of Josie King's mother who related the story of medical errors and a breakdown in communication among healthcare workers that lead to the death of her 18 month-old daughter. Sharing Josie's story with staff helped them understand the program's purpose. Brochures are given to patients on admission about the program and how to utilize it. A grid with role responsibilities, process algorithm, documentation form, and operator tree were created with multidisciplinary involvement. Surveys assess patients/families' understanding and reaction to having Condition H available. Most evaluated are aware of the program and have an adequate understanding. They report feeling more secure and safe knowing Condition H is available. Mock drills have been conducted to help us move toward hospital-wide implementation. At this time, we have yet to receive our first call (which we interpret as a good outcome).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:29:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:29:24Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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