2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182557
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Satisfaction with Integrative Therapies for Hospitalized Patients
Author(s):
Overman Dube, Joyce; Foss, Diane
Author Details:
Joyce Overman Dube, M.S., R.N., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, email: overmandube.joyce@mayo.edu; Diane Foss, BS, RN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Utilization of Integrative Therapies has been shown to decrease states of anxiety, pain, and tension as well as increase relaxation in hospitalized patients. Learn about initiatives that increased the availability and utilization of Integrative Therapies for hospitalized patients and resulted in increased patient satisfaction. ABSTRACT: Integrative Therapies have been proven to promote positive psychological and physiological responses in patients. Evidence suggests that the utilization of integrative therapies is correlated with decreased states of anxiety, pain, and tension as well as increased states of relaxation in the hospitalized patient1, 2, 3. Committed to continually enhancing the patient experience, we initiated efforts to investigate the availability of integrative therapy and provide the services desired by patients on our patient care unit. The goal of this multidisciplinary quality improvement team was to identify knowledge of and desire for Integrative Therapy modalities, implement the desired therapies and measure patient and staff satisfaction. Rapid cycle improvement activities were implemented over a six month time period and included patient and staff surveys assessing knowledge of and availability of integrative therapies in our setting, satisfaction with resources for staff, satisfaction with services provided to patients and implementation of new therapies. Therapies implemented, based on patient preferences, included massage therapies, guided imagery, music therapy, sleep enhancement protocols and various other activities. Nursing knowledge about availability of Integrative Therapies increased significantly through this improvement project due to the educational programs and resources made available to nurses based on an identified knowledge deficit. The team continues to assess needs on a routine basis and implement new programs based on patient and staff feedback. Efforts to hold the gains include reinforcing availability of established programs. Patient and staff satisfaction improved over the measurement period. REFERENCES: 1) McRee LD, Noble S, Pasvogel A. (2003). Using massage and music therapy to improve postoperative outcomes. AORN J, 78(3): 433-447. 2) Horowitz S. (2007). Evidence-based indications for therapeutic massage. Alternative & Complementary Therapies, February: 30-35. 3) Tusek DL, Church JM, Strong SA, Grass JA, Fazio VW. (1997). Guided Imagery: a significant advance in the care of patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. Dis Colon Rectum, 40(2): 172-178.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Satisfaction with Integrative Therapies for Hospitalized Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOverman Dube, Joyceen_US
dc.contributor.authorFoss, Dianeen_US
dc.author.detailsJoyce Overman Dube, M.S., R.N., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, email: overmandube.joyce@mayo.edu; Diane Foss, BS, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182557-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Utilization of Integrative Therapies has been shown to decrease states of anxiety, pain, and tension as well as increase relaxation in hospitalized patients. Learn about initiatives that increased the availability and utilization of Integrative Therapies for hospitalized patients and resulted in increased patient satisfaction. ABSTRACT: Integrative Therapies have been proven to promote positive psychological and physiological responses in patients. Evidence suggests that the utilization of integrative therapies is correlated with decreased states of anxiety, pain, and tension as well as increased states of relaxation in the hospitalized patient1, 2, 3. Committed to continually enhancing the patient experience, we initiated efforts to investigate the availability of integrative therapy and provide the services desired by patients on our patient care unit. The goal of this multidisciplinary quality improvement team was to identify knowledge of and desire for Integrative Therapy modalities, implement the desired therapies and measure patient and staff satisfaction. Rapid cycle improvement activities were implemented over a six month time period and included patient and staff surveys assessing knowledge of and availability of integrative therapies in our setting, satisfaction with resources for staff, satisfaction with services provided to patients and implementation of new therapies. Therapies implemented, based on patient preferences, included massage therapies, guided imagery, music therapy, sleep enhancement protocols and various other activities. Nursing knowledge about availability of Integrative Therapies increased significantly through this improvement project due to the educational programs and resources made available to nurses based on an identified knowledge deficit. The team continues to assess needs on a routine basis and implement new programs based on patient and staff feedback. Efforts to hold the gains include reinforcing availability of established programs. Patient and staff satisfaction improved over the measurement period. REFERENCES: 1) McRee LD, Noble S, Pasvogel A. (2003). Using massage and music therapy to improve postoperative outcomes. AORN J, 78(3): 433-447. 2) Horowitz S. (2007). Evidence-based indications for therapeutic massage. Alternative & Complementary Therapies, February: 30-35. 3) Tusek DL, Church JM, Strong SA, Grass JA, Fazio VW. (1997). Guided Imagery: a significant advance in the care of patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. Dis Colon Rectum, 40(2): 172-178.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:29:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:29:32Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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