2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182558
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of a Nurse-Managed Mobility Protocol on Functional Outcomes
Author(s):
Padula, Cynthia; Baumhover, Lisa; Hughes, Cynthia
Author Details:
Cynthia Padula, PhD, RN, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: cpadula@lifespan.org; Lisa Baumhover, RN, MS, Iowa Health System; Cynthia Hughes, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a mobility protocol on functional decline in hospitalized older adults. Study method, findings, and implications for practice will be presented and discussed. ABSTRACT: Maintaining mobility is key in preserving older adults' functional ability. Low mobility and bedrest are common during hospitalization, resulting in functional decline. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a mobility protocol on functional decline in hospitalized older adults. Study hypotheses were: (1) older adults who participate in a mobility protocol will maintain or improve functional status from admission to discharge; and (2) will have a reduced length of stay (LOS). The sample consisted of people admitted with select medical diagnoses. A convenience sample (N=50) was recruited from two units. Nurses on the intervention unit received training related to implementation of a mobility protocol, while nurses on the control unit did not. Inclusion criteria included: > 60 years of age; admitted with identified medical diagnoses; LOS > 3 days; able to understand English; cognitively intact or with a significant other able to participate. The study employed a nonequivalent control group design. The independent variable was mobility protocol; dependent variables were functional status and LOS. Functional status was measured using: the Barthel Index, a scale with 15 weighted items that provides an estimate of level of dependence; the Up & Go, to measure subjects' ability to stand from an arm chair. Reliability and validity of both are well established. Data were collected by a trained nurse who reviewed medical records to establish eligibility and conducted a MMSE. Waiver of informed consent was granted by the IRB; an informational letter was used to describe the study purpose and procedures. The nurse completed the Barthel Index and Up and Go within 48 hours of admission and at discharge, and retrieved demographic and other relevant data from the medical record. Descriptive statistics were performed, and differences between the groups were examined on selected variables. No significant group differences were identified at baseline. The first hypothesis was partially supported; the treatment group had greater improvement in Barthel scores (69.12 to 80.56 treatment vs. 64.2 to 71.08 control; NS) than the control group. The second hypothesis was supported; the treatment group had a significantly shorter LOS (4.96 days) than the control group (8.72 days) (p < .001). Practice implications include emphasis on ambulation in to maintain function status and prevent functional decline. REFERENCES: Brown, C., Friedkin, R., & Inouye, S. (2004). Prevalence and outcomes of low mobility in hospitalized older patients. JAGS, 52: 1263-1270. Mathias, S., Nayak, U., & Isaacs, B. (1986) Balance in the elderly: the 'Get up and Go' test. Archives Phys Med Rehabil, 67: 387-391. Podsiadlo, D., & Richardson, S. (1991). The timed "up & go": a test of basic functional mobility for frail elderly persons. JAGS, 39, 142-148. Siebens, H., Aronow, H., Edwards, D., & Ghasemi, Z. (2000). A randomized control trial of exercise to improve outcomes of acute hospitalization in older adults. JAGS, 48: 1545-1552.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of a Nurse-Managed Mobility Protocol on Functional Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPadula, Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaumhover, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Cynthiaen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Padula, PhD, RN, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: cpadula@lifespan.org; Lisa Baumhover, RN, MS, Iowa Health System; Cynthia Hughes, MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182558-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a mobility protocol on functional decline in hospitalized older adults. Study method, findings, and implications for practice will be presented and discussed. ABSTRACT: Maintaining mobility is key in preserving older adults' functional ability. Low mobility and bedrest are common during hospitalization, resulting in functional decline. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a mobility protocol on functional decline in hospitalized older adults. Study hypotheses were: (1) older adults who participate in a mobility protocol will maintain or improve functional status from admission to discharge; and (2) will have a reduced length of stay (LOS). The sample consisted of people admitted with select medical diagnoses. A convenience sample (N=50) was recruited from two units. Nurses on the intervention unit received training related to implementation of a mobility protocol, while nurses on the control unit did not. Inclusion criteria included: &gt; 60 years of age; admitted with identified medical diagnoses; LOS &gt; 3 days; able to understand English; cognitively intact or with a significant other able to participate. The study employed a nonequivalent control group design. The independent variable was mobility protocol; dependent variables were functional status and LOS. Functional status was measured using: the Barthel Index, a scale with 15 weighted items that provides an estimate of level of dependence; the Up & Go, to measure subjects' ability to stand from an arm chair. Reliability and validity of both are well established. Data were collected by a trained nurse who reviewed medical records to establish eligibility and conducted a MMSE. Waiver of informed consent was granted by the IRB; an informational letter was used to describe the study purpose and procedures. The nurse completed the Barthel Index and Up and Go within 48 hours of admission and at discharge, and retrieved demographic and other relevant data from the medical record. Descriptive statistics were performed, and differences between the groups were examined on selected variables. No significant group differences were identified at baseline. The first hypothesis was partially supported; the treatment group had greater improvement in Barthel scores (69.12 to 80.56 treatment vs. 64.2 to 71.08 control; NS) than the control group. The second hypothesis was supported; the treatment group had a significantly shorter LOS (4.96 days) than the control group (8.72 days) (p &lt; .001). Practice implications include emphasis on ambulation in to maintain function status and prevent functional decline. REFERENCES: Brown, C., Friedkin, R., & Inouye, S. (2004). Prevalence and outcomes of low mobility in hospitalized older patients. JAGS, 52: 1263-1270. Mathias, S., Nayak, U., & Isaacs, B. (1986) Balance in the elderly: the 'Get up and Go' test. Archives Phys Med Rehabil, 67: 387-391. Podsiadlo, D., & Richardson, S. (1991). The timed "up & go": a test of basic functional mobility for frail elderly persons. JAGS, 39, 142-148. Siebens, H., Aronow, H., Edwards, D., & Ghasemi, Z. (2000). A randomized control trial of exercise to improve outcomes of acute hospitalization in older adults. JAGS, 48: 1545-1552.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:29:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:29:34Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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