2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182560
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complexity Compression and the Staff Nurse Work Environment
Author(s):
Pinkerton, SueEllen; Cusanza, Sharon; Rice, Karen; Jankowski, Kathy
Author Details:
SueEllen Pinkerton, PhD, RN, FAAN, CSC, St Augustine, Florida, USA, email: spinkerton@csc.com; Sharon Cusanza, RN, BSN, CPHQ, Ochsner Medical Center; Karen Rice, DNS(c), APRN, BC, Ochsner Medical Center; Kathy Jankowski, RN, MSN, MBA CSC
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Staff nurses regularly assume additional, unplanned responsibilities while they continue managing multiple assignments, a phenomenon identified as Complexity Compression. This presentation reports research that examined the correlations between Complexity Compression, the staff nurse work environment and other select variables. ABSTRACT: It is estimated that nurses spend up to 40% of their workday responding to demands of the organizations where they work, the implication being this time is not available to patients (the equivalent time of two out of five staff nurses is not available). Nurses are expected to assume additional, unplanned, unexpected responsibilities each day while they simultaneously conduct their multiple other responsibilities, a phenomenon named Complexity Compression (1). Three factors have been identified that define Complexity Compression (CC): Work of Nursing Factor which includes variables such as conflicting responsibilities, floating, lack of backup, conflict with co-workers, system failure, time, patient/family issues and lack of physical space (2); Systems Factor which includes variables such as documentation, changes in upper management, lack of understanding of nursing, budget, no input into decision making, technology and staffing (3); Personal Factor which includes variables such as physical and mental exhaustion and family/individual issues (4). The implications of CC relate to the impact on patients, quality and the cognitive complexity of the work of nursing. The CC survey instrument is a diagnostic tool used to assess the staff nurse work complexity and compression of a specific nursing unit or organization, identifying those factors that contribute most to CC (5). Strategies are then developed to address the factors. CC goes hand-in-hand with the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses six Healthy Work Environment Standards (6). The standards survey instrument is used to assess both the nursing unit and the organization (7). In the research reported in this presentation, the variables of CC are correlated with the components of the standards of a healthy work environment, data from NDNQI reports, demographics, and other available core measurements and within the concepts of turbulence and chaos identified in the research reported by the Florida Organization of Nurse Executives (8). The correlations are analyzed by the staff of the individual units and organizations. The recommended interventions are reported and discussed. The research is being conducted on a national scale and relevant national data will be shared, including any differences between Magnet, Magnet journey and no Magnet activity at the organizations. REFERENCES: (1) Krichbaum, K., Diemert, C., Jacox, L., Jones, A., Koenig, P., Mueller, C., & Disch, J. (2007). Complexity compression: Nurses under fire. Nursing Forum. 42(2), 86-94. (2) Minnesota Nurses Association: The work of nursing factor. Minneapolis, MN. http://www.mnnurses.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={304929BF-8ECA-48B2-BA92-6708A606B32B} Accessed January 31, 2008. (3) Minnesota Nurses Association: The systems factor. Minneapolis, MN. http://www.mnnurses.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={C9EBD996-E405-4955-B583-F0127953B9F5} Accessed January 31, 2008. (4) Minnesota Nurses Association: The personal factor. Minneapolis, MN. http://www.mnnurses.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={2F38704E-DA8E-42C7-ABAD-7CF6B1A0B9BC} Accessed January 31, 2008. (5) Minnesota Nurses Association: Use in nursing practice. Minneapolis, MN. http://www.mnnurses.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={B36DB3B0-4FDD-4D5A-AEA9-CA01C86E2818} Accessed January 31, 2008. (6) Ulrich, B.T., Lavandero, R., Hart, K.A., Woods, D., Leggett, J., & Taylor, D. (2006). Critical care nurses' work environments: A baseline status report. Critical Care Nurse. 26(5), 46-57. (7) Ulrich, B.T., Woods, D., Hart, K. A., Lavandero, R., Leggett, J., & Taylor, D. (2007). Critical care nurses' work environments value of excellence in Beacon units and Magnet organizations. Critical Care Nurse. 27(3), 68-77. (8) Florida Organization of Nurse Executives (FONE) Research Committee (Brown, C.L., Schmidt, L.A., Rivers, R., Byers, J.) Environments that support nursing: Research shows Magnet status makes a difference. Atlanta, GA: Eleventh National Magnet Conference: October 3, 2007.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplexity Compression and the Staff Nurse Work Environmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorPinkerton, SueEllenen_US
dc.contributor.authorCusanza, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.authorRice, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorJankowski, Kathyen_US
dc.author.detailsSueEllen Pinkerton, PhD, RN, FAAN, CSC, St Augustine, Florida, USA, email: spinkerton@csc.com; Sharon Cusanza, RN, BSN, CPHQ, Ochsner Medical Center; Karen Rice, DNS(c), APRN, BC, Ochsner Medical Center; Kathy Jankowski, RN, MSN, MBA CSCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182560-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Staff nurses regularly assume additional, unplanned responsibilities while they continue managing multiple assignments, a phenomenon identified as Complexity Compression. This presentation reports research that examined the correlations between Complexity Compression, the staff nurse work environment and other select variables. ABSTRACT: It is estimated that nurses spend up to 40% of their workday responding to demands of the organizations where they work, the implication being this time is not available to patients (the equivalent time of two out of five staff nurses is not available). Nurses are expected to assume additional, unplanned, unexpected responsibilities each day while they simultaneously conduct their multiple other responsibilities, a phenomenon named Complexity Compression (1). Three factors have been identified that define Complexity Compression (CC): Work of Nursing Factor which includes variables such as conflicting responsibilities, floating, lack of backup, conflict with co-workers, system failure, time, patient/family issues and lack of physical space (2); Systems Factor which includes variables such as documentation, changes in upper management, lack of understanding of nursing, budget, no input into decision making, technology and staffing (3); Personal Factor which includes variables such as physical and mental exhaustion and family/individual issues (4). The implications of CC relate to the impact on patients, quality and the cognitive complexity of the work of nursing. The CC survey instrument is a diagnostic tool used to assess the staff nurse work complexity and compression of a specific nursing unit or organization, identifying those factors that contribute most to CC (5). Strategies are then developed to address the factors. CC goes hand-in-hand with the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses six Healthy Work Environment Standards (6). The standards survey instrument is used to assess both the nursing unit and the organization (7). In the research reported in this presentation, the variables of CC are correlated with the components of the standards of a healthy work environment, data from NDNQI reports, demographics, and other available core measurements and within the concepts of turbulence and chaos identified in the research reported by the Florida Organization of Nurse Executives (8). The correlations are analyzed by the staff of the individual units and organizations. The recommended interventions are reported and discussed. The research is being conducted on a national scale and relevant national data will be shared, including any differences between Magnet, Magnet journey and no Magnet activity at the organizations. REFERENCES: (1) Krichbaum, K., Diemert, C., Jacox, L., Jones, A., Koenig, P., Mueller, C., & Disch, J. (2007). Complexity compression: Nurses under fire. Nursing Forum. 42(2), 86-94. (2) Minnesota Nurses Association: The work of nursing factor. Minneapolis, MN. http://www.mnnurses.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={304929BF-8ECA-48B2-BA92-6708A606B32B} Accessed January 31, 2008. (3) Minnesota Nurses Association: The systems factor. Minneapolis, MN. http://www.mnnurses.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={C9EBD996-E405-4955-B583-F0127953B9F5} Accessed January 31, 2008. (4) Minnesota Nurses Association: The personal factor. Minneapolis, MN. http://www.mnnurses.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={2F38704E-DA8E-42C7-ABAD-7CF6B1A0B9BC} Accessed January 31, 2008. (5) Minnesota Nurses Association: Use in nursing practice. Minneapolis, MN. http://www.mnnurses.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={B36DB3B0-4FDD-4D5A-AEA9-CA01C86E2818} Accessed January 31, 2008. (6) Ulrich, B.T., Lavandero, R., Hart, K.A., Woods, D., Leggett, J., & Taylor, D. (2006). Critical care nurses' work environments: A baseline status report. Critical Care Nurse. 26(5), 46-57. (7) Ulrich, B.T., Woods, D., Hart, K. A., Lavandero, R., Leggett, J., & Taylor, D. (2007). Critical care nurses' work environments value of excellence in Beacon units and Magnet organizations. Critical Care Nurse. 27(3), 68-77. (8) Florida Organization of Nurse Executives (FONE) Research Committee (Brown, C.L., Schmidt, L.A., Rivers, R., Byers, J.) Environments that support nursing: Research shows Magnet status makes a difference. Atlanta, GA: Eleventh National Magnet Conference: October 3, 2007.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:29:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:29:40Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.