2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182563
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moving Order Entry Off the Units to Improve Safety
Author(s):
Potts, Ronetta; Berger, Jill
Author Details:
Ronetta Potts, Kosair Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: Ronetta.Potts@nortonhealthcare.org; Jill Berger, RN, BSN, MBA, CAN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: The med/surg Unit Secretary position had become increasingly complex with multiple high-priority demands and numerous interruptions. The list of duties included entering orders, answering phones, responding to the call system, controlling visitor access to the unit, assembling charts for new admissions, breaking down charts at discharge, relaying communication on the unit and between departments, and more. In addition, nearly every task was considered a priority: an alarming monitor required immediate attention; a parent or patient expected an immediate response to the call light; a STAT physician order had to be entered immediately. Our secretaries faced a constant challenge of trying to devote undivided attention to accurate order entry while promptly responding to other duties. Time studies revealed as many as 280 interruptions per hour, making accurate order entry impossible. Despite heroic efforts by the secretaries, random audits of entered physician orders showed 35% to 48% of the orders had errors, which created quality and safety risks for the patient, as well as enormous stress for the secretary. To remedy this problem, a separate order entry department was established. The goal was to separate the order entry functions from the unit coordination tasks so that both sets of skills could be mastered and executed well. Unit secretaries responsible for order entry were moved to a quiet location away from the constant interruptions of the nursing station, and this allows the secretaries on the unit to focus their attention on call lights, communication and greeting visitors. With fewer secretaries entering orders, there is greater opportunity for individualized training and monitoring related to order entry. Unit-based secretaries are also receiving specialized training in communication and service-related skills. In only three months, the order entry error rate had dropped to only 2%, and the response to call lights, monitors and alarms on the units...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.]
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoving Order Entry Off the Units to Improve Safetyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPotts, Ronettaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerger, Jillen_US
dc.author.detailsRonetta Potts, Kosair Children's Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: Ronetta.Potts@nortonhealthcare.org; Jill Berger, RN, BSN, MBA, CANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182563-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: The med/surg Unit Secretary position had become increasingly complex with multiple high-priority demands and numerous interruptions. The list of duties included entering orders, answering phones, responding to the call system, controlling visitor access to the unit, assembling charts for new admissions, breaking down charts at discharge, relaying communication on the unit and between departments, and more. In addition, nearly every task was considered a priority: an alarming monitor required immediate attention; a parent or patient expected an immediate response to the call light; a STAT physician order had to be entered immediately. Our secretaries faced a constant challenge of trying to devote undivided attention to accurate order entry while promptly responding to other duties. Time studies revealed as many as 280 interruptions per hour, making accurate order entry impossible. Despite heroic efforts by the secretaries, random audits of entered physician orders showed 35% to 48% of the orders had errors, which created quality and safety risks for the patient, as well as enormous stress for the secretary. To remedy this problem, a separate order entry department was established. The goal was to separate the order entry functions from the unit coordination tasks so that both sets of skills could be mastered and executed well. Unit secretaries responsible for order entry were moved to a quiet location away from the constant interruptions of the nursing station, and this allows the secretaries on the unit to focus their attention on call lights, communication and greeting visitors. With fewer secretaries entering orders, there is greater opportunity for individualized training and monitoring related to order entry. Unit-based secretaries are also receiving specialized training in communication and service-related skills. In only three months, the order entry error rate had dropped to only 2%, and the response to call lights, monitors and alarms on the units...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:29:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:29:47Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.