2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182568
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Defining Excellence: Redefining Healing with Interdisciplinary Palliative Care
Author(s):
Randle, Meg; Williams, Deanne
Author Details:
Meg Randle, MS, CHPN, Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah, USA, email: meg.randle@imail.org; Deanne Williams
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Learn how the Forces of Magnetism support the provision of palliative care by improving interdisciplinary relationships, supporting the nurses as teachers, and influencing consultations and resources. Collectively these initiatives have enhanced recruitment and retention among nurses. ABSTRACT: In recognition that success measures of quality care can no longer focus only on ôcureö, palliative care redefines and expands success to include interventions that promote healing of patient and family when a cure is not available or survival at all cost is not the preferred path. The World Health Organization defines palliative care as an approach which improves quality of life for patients and their families facing life-threatening illnesses through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems: physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. A comprehensive program has six major skill sets that comprise quality palliative care: Communication, Decision-making, Management of complications from treatment and the disease, Symptom control, Psychosocial care of patient and family, Care of the dying. In 2003, a multi-disciplinary committee at a 500-bed urban hospital developed a palliative care program to improve care for patients and families living with advanced disease, difficult symptom management, and a need for support as they faced end of life care within the acute care setting. The program has grown into a three tiered approach now offered in two hospitals: 1) basic bedside nurse education on comfort care when patients are dying in the hospital including support for staff, 2) an 8 hour training program for specially trained palliative care resource nurses, and 3) a nurse practitioner led consult service providing care in collaboration with the patient's attending physician, coordinating care with community based referral facilities and training of other health care professionals within the organization. This presentation will review the core values of a palliative care program as they intersect with the Forces of Magnetism and will review key components, measures of success and common challenges in the establishment of this valuable patient centered service. Using case examples, the presenter will focus on interdisciplinary communication between the nurse, case manager, social workers, volunteers, chaplaincy, or pain service, the concept of supporting a program via documentation of "cost avoidance, and the introduction of a new state advanced healthcare directives program. Attendees will also learn about unique program components, which include community-based grief programs, a certified music thanatologist and the No One Dies Alone volunteer program. REFERENCES: Campbell, ML.(2006). Palliative care consultation in the intensive care unit. Critical Care Medicine Supplement; 34(11): S355-358. Harrison, JP, Ford, D, Wilson, K. (2005) The impact of hospice programs on U.S. hospitals. Nursing Economics; 2(23)3;pp78-89. Henkel, Gretchen (2006) Hospital-based palliative care programs boon to patients and staff alike. Oncology times; 28(13) 7:15-17 Noonan, David (2006) Special care at end of life-a case study. Newsweek. October 16; pp 67-68.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDefining Excellence: Redefining Healing with Interdisciplinary Palliative Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRandle, Megen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Deanneen_US
dc.author.detailsMeg Randle, MS, CHPN, Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah, USA, email: meg.randle@imail.org; Deanne Williamsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182568-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Learn how the Forces of Magnetism support the provision of palliative care by improving interdisciplinary relationships, supporting the nurses as teachers, and influencing consultations and resources. Collectively these initiatives have enhanced recruitment and retention among nurses. ABSTRACT: In recognition that success measures of quality care can no longer focus only on ôcureö, palliative care redefines and expands success to include interventions that promote healing of patient and family when a cure is not available or survival at all cost is not the preferred path. The World Health Organization defines palliative care as an approach which improves quality of life for patients and their families facing life-threatening illnesses through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems: physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. A comprehensive program has six major skill sets that comprise quality palliative care: Communication, Decision-making, Management of complications from treatment and the disease, Symptom control, Psychosocial care of patient and family, Care of the dying. In 2003, a multi-disciplinary committee at a 500-bed urban hospital developed a palliative care program to improve care for patients and families living with advanced disease, difficult symptom management, and a need for support as they faced end of life care within the acute care setting. The program has grown into a three tiered approach now offered in two hospitals: 1) basic bedside nurse education on comfort care when patients are dying in the hospital including support for staff, 2) an 8 hour training program for specially trained palliative care resource nurses, and 3) a nurse practitioner led consult service providing care in collaboration with the patient's attending physician, coordinating care with community based referral facilities and training of other health care professionals within the organization. This presentation will review the core values of a palliative care program as they intersect with the Forces of Magnetism and will review key components, measures of success and common challenges in the establishment of this valuable patient centered service. Using case examples, the presenter will focus on interdisciplinary communication between the nurse, case manager, social workers, volunteers, chaplaincy, or pain service, the concept of supporting a program via documentation of "cost avoidance, and the introduction of a new state advanced healthcare directives program. Attendees will also learn about unique program components, which include community-based grief programs, a certified music thanatologist and the No One Dies Alone volunteer program. REFERENCES: Campbell, ML.(2006). Palliative care consultation in the intensive care unit. Critical Care Medicine Supplement; 34(11): S355-358. Harrison, JP, Ford, D, Wilson, K. (2005) The impact of hospice programs on U.S. hospitals. Nursing Economics; 2(23)3;pp78-89. Henkel, Gretchen (2006) Hospital-based palliative care programs boon to patients and staff alike. Oncology times; 28(13) 7:15-17 Noonan, David (2006) Special care at end of life-a case study. Newsweek. October 16; pp 67-68.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:30:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:30:00Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.