2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182570
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Engaging Nurses in the Early Detection of Patient Deterioration
Author(s):
Rawls, Mary Catherine; Karon, Nancy
Author Details:
Mary Catherine Rawls, RN, MS, BC, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA, email: mary.catherine.rawls@hitchcock.org; Nancy Karon, RN, BSN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Failure to rescue is a national safety problem often associated with death. Learn how early detection by nurses results in improved patient care quality. ABSTRACT: Failure to rescue related to drug-induced respiratory depression is a significant threat to patient safety and can result in death. Early detection/treatment of deterioration can interrupt this progression to arrest. Our organization's patient safety priority is to maximize patient pain management in the safest possible way by utilizing equipment to enhance patient assessment for earlier recognition of deterioration. A 36-bed orthopaedic surgical unit embarked on a pilot project to create a process for routine non-invasive surveillance using oxygen saturation and pulse count for early detection of unexpected events. Parameters measured are intended to trigger early rescue in a patient population for whom nurses could not predict physiological deterioration e.g. the healthy postoperative patient. The first goal of the pilot project was to establish optimal alarm settings to detect deterioration while limiting nuisance alarms. A second goal was to establish a surveillance competency program for dissemination throughout the hospital. Initial alarm settings were a low SPO2 threshold of 75% and heartrate of 50-140 bpm. Nurses conducted daily rounds to identify gaps in learning and methods to eliminate false alarms. Several direct care nurses quickly emerged as informal leaders and influenced revisions made to the system's software and reprogramming of pagers used for nurse notification. Alarm thresholds were revised to provide for optimum surveillance and a plan for patient/family education was identified. Throughout this process, nurses enhanced their critical thinking and problem-solving skills while working collaboratively with biomedical engineering, respiratory therapy, computer information management, a human factors and engineering consultant, vendor educators and consultants. Patient outcomes improved with earlier identification of respiratory and cardiac abnormalities. The number of early reponse team calls and codes decreased. Nurses identified the surveillance equipment as a vital tool in assisting them in providing safer patient care while virtually eliminating false alarms.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEngaging Nurses in the Early Detection of Patient Deteriorationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRawls, Mary Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorKaron, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Catherine Rawls, RN, MS, BC, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA, email: mary.catherine.rawls@hitchcock.org; Nancy Karon, RN, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182570-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Failure to rescue is a national safety problem often associated with death. Learn how early detection by nurses results in improved patient care quality. ABSTRACT: Failure to rescue related to drug-induced respiratory depression is a significant threat to patient safety and can result in death. Early detection/treatment of deterioration can interrupt this progression to arrest. Our organization's patient safety priority is to maximize patient pain management in the safest possible way by utilizing equipment to enhance patient assessment for earlier recognition of deterioration. A 36-bed orthopaedic surgical unit embarked on a pilot project to create a process for routine non-invasive surveillance using oxygen saturation and pulse count for early detection of unexpected events. Parameters measured are intended to trigger early rescue in a patient population for whom nurses could not predict physiological deterioration e.g. the healthy postoperative patient. The first goal of the pilot project was to establish optimal alarm settings to detect deterioration while limiting nuisance alarms. A second goal was to establish a surveillance competency program for dissemination throughout the hospital. Initial alarm settings were a low SPO2 threshold of 75% and heartrate of 50-140 bpm. Nurses conducted daily rounds to identify gaps in learning and methods to eliminate false alarms. Several direct care nurses quickly emerged as informal leaders and influenced revisions made to the system's software and reprogramming of pagers used for nurse notification. Alarm thresholds were revised to provide for optimum surveillance and a plan for patient/family education was identified. Throughout this process, nurses enhanced their critical thinking and problem-solving skills while working collaboratively with biomedical engineering, respiratory therapy, computer information management, a human factors and engineering consultant, vendor educators and consultants. Patient outcomes improved with earlier identification of respiratory and cardiac abnormalities. The number of early reponse team calls and codes decreased. Nurses identified the surveillance equipment as a vital tool in assisting them in providing safer patient care while virtually eliminating false alarms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:30:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:30:06Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.