2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182574
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Champion Innovations: Examining and Improving Core Measure Performance
Author(s):
Remancus, Kelly; Cumoletti, Kristen
Author Details:
Kelly Remancus, RN, BS, St. Peter's Hospital, Albany, New York, USA, email: kremancus@stpetershealthcare.org; Kristen Cumoletti, RN, BS
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will describe a cardiac Core Measure quality improvement project led by RN facilitators in which point of care processes were evaluated and demonstrated positive outcomes. The realignment of roles within the QI process focused on the RN as clinical leader whose primary activity is active surveillance resulting in change at the bedside. ABSTRACT: Nurse Champion Innovations: Examining and Improving Core Measure Performance for Cardiac Patients Background: Core Measures are nationally accepted, evidence-based performance standards that measure process of care outcomes. Improved care of the hospitalized patient has been correlated with the implementation of core measures. To improve the care of hospitalized cardiac patients these indicators were developed for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) diagnoses and heart failure (HF). Motivation: The institution, a Magnet designated 440 bed community hospital, is committed to provide excellence in patient care. A review of quality data in 2006 showed an opportunity for improvement in AMI and HF compliance indicators. Our conceptual framework and care delivery philosophy became our impetus to exceed the national benchmarks for AMI and HF. In order to impact point of care outcomes, the review process needed to be transformed. Approach: The PDSA method was used to restructure the quality improvement (QI) teams with an RN in the role of clinical lead. The transformation of the review process included active surveillance as the primary activity of the RN clinical lead. A system based approach was developed for cardiac QI that is concurrent, coordinated across the healthcare system, with clear accountability and responsibility. With the support of information technology (IT), efforts were focused on education, communication, and relationship building. Resources were assigned to initiatives with the development of small work groups to put best practice into action. Results: Core measure performance improved, exceeding the JCAHO national benchmarks for cardiac clinical outcomes. For AMI, median door-to-balloon times decreased from 105.5 minutes (n=14) in 3rd quarter 2006, to 66 minutes (n=10) in 3rd quarter 2007. For HF, the appropriate care measure (a measure of all the care the patient was entitled to receive) has increased from 82.4% (n=153) in the 1st quarter 2006 to 94.4%in 3rd quarter 2007 (n=126) with the greatest achievement seen in the nursing indicators. Conclusion: Increasing the healthcare team members' knowledge of AMI and HF clinical indicators has improved care at the point of service. Using IT in conjunction with evidence based practice standards, we redefined our ability to assess, monitor and implement care for our patient population. We believe this process can be replicated to achieve top performance for other core measure diagnoses.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Champion Innovations: Examining and Improving Core Measure Performanceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRemancus, Kellyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCumoletti, Kristenen_US
dc.author.detailsKelly Remancus, RN, BS, St. Peter's Hospital, Albany, New York, USA, email: kremancus@stpetershealthcare.org; Kristen Cumoletti, RN, BSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182574-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will describe a cardiac Core Measure quality improvement project led by RN facilitators in which point of care processes were evaluated and demonstrated positive outcomes. The realignment of roles within the QI process focused on the RN as clinical leader whose primary activity is active surveillance resulting in change at the bedside. ABSTRACT: Nurse Champion Innovations: Examining and Improving Core Measure Performance for Cardiac Patients Background: Core Measures are nationally accepted, evidence-based performance standards that measure process of care outcomes. Improved care of the hospitalized patient has been correlated with the implementation of core measures. To improve the care of hospitalized cardiac patients these indicators were developed for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) diagnoses and heart failure (HF). Motivation: The institution, a Magnet designated 440 bed community hospital, is committed to provide excellence in patient care. A review of quality data in 2006 showed an opportunity for improvement in AMI and HF compliance indicators. Our conceptual framework and care delivery philosophy became our impetus to exceed the national benchmarks for AMI and HF. In order to impact point of care outcomes, the review process needed to be transformed. Approach: The PDSA method was used to restructure the quality improvement (QI) teams with an RN in the role of clinical lead. The transformation of the review process included active surveillance as the primary activity of the RN clinical lead. A system based approach was developed for cardiac QI that is concurrent, coordinated across the healthcare system, with clear accountability and responsibility. With the support of information technology (IT), efforts were focused on education, communication, and relationship building. Resources were assigned to initiatives with the development of small work groups to put best practice into action. Results: Core measure performance improved, exceeding the JCAHO national benchmarks for cardiac clinical outcomes. For AMI, median door-to-balloon times decreased from 105.5 minutes (n=14) in 3rd quarter 2006, to 66 minutes (n=10) in 3rd quarter 2007. For HF, the appropriate care measure (a measure of all the care the patient was entitled to receive) has increased from 82.4% (n=153) in the 1st quarter 2006 to 94.4%in 3rd quarter 2007 (n=126) with the greatest achievement seen in the nursing indicators. Conclusion: Increasing the healthcare team members' knowledge of AMI and HF clinical indicators has improved care at the point of service. Using IT in conjunction with evidence based practice standards, we redefined our ability to assess, monitor and implement care for our patient population. We believe this process can be replicated to achieve top performance for other core measure diagnoses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:30:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:30:17Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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