2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182580
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Nurse Residency Program on Self-Reported Confidence
Author(s):
Roe, Donna; Barrett, Roseann; Duchene, Pamela
Author Details:
Donna Roe, MS, APRN, BC, CEN, St. Joseph Hospital, Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, email: droe@sjhnh.org; Roseann Barrett, PhD, RN; Pamela Duchene, PhD, APRN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: In an effort to retain new graduate RNs and assist in practice transition, areas new RNs do not feel confident or competent in are imperative to identify. With mounting evidence of a continued nursing shortage and the aging workforce it is important to investigate ways to improve onboarding of new RNs nurses. One strategy is through formal Nurse Residency Programs (NRP). In a pilot study of graduate RNs in a formalized NRP, self-confidence and confidence were investigated. Data was collected over a 2-yr period. RNs enrolled in the NRP were asked to rate perceived confidence on a scale of 0=none to 4=able to teach others in 11 areas of nursing activity: critical thinking, goal setting, plans of care, time management, organization, computer skills, discharge planning, documentation, patient/family education, communication skills, and cultural diversity. There was statistically significant improvement in perceived confidence in all activities resident except plans of care, time management, and organization after completion of the NRP. The nursing activity with the highest preNRP score for confidence (mean 2.6, SD = .68) was communication skills. Confidence in discharge planning was rated the lowest by the residents (1.4, SD= .80) prior to the NRP. The most improvement in nurse residents' mean perceived confidence scores was in discharge planning, documentation, computer skills, patient/family education, and cultural diversity. Residents rated perceived confidence scale in 52 specific clinical skills from 0=none to 4=able to teach. There were statistically significant differences in residents' mean scores before and after the NRP for the following four groupings of critical clinical skills: medication administration (t=-6.8, df=20, p=.000),IV therapy (t=-6.8, df =20, p=.000), physical assessments (t= -4.5, df=20, p=.000), and handling emergencies (t= -4.2., df=20, p=.000). This study yielded data helping to determine what, if any relationship exists between new graduate RN's enrolled...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Almada, P., Carafoli, K., Flattery, J. French, D., & McNamara, M. (2004). Improving the retention rate of newly graduated nurses. Journal of Nurses in Staff Development 20(6), pp 268-273. American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2002). AACN white paper: Hallmarks of the professional nursing practice environment, January 2002 @ http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Publications/positions/hallmarks.htm. Bartlett, H., Simonite, V., Westcott, E., & Taylor, H. (2000). A comparison of the nursing competence of graduates and diplomates from UK nursing programs. Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 9, pp 369-381. Beecroft, P., Kunzman, L. & Krozek, C. (2001). RN internship; outcomes of a one-year pilot program. Journal of Nursing Administration, 31(12), pp 575-582. Beeman, K., Jernigan, A., & Hensley, P. (1999). Employing new grads: a plan for success. Nursing Economics, 17(2), pp 91-95. Benner, P. (1984) From novice to expert; excellence and power in clinical nursing practice. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company Inc. Ca. Benner, P., & Wrubel, J. (1982). Skilled clinical knowledge: the value of perceptual awareness. Part 1. Journal of Nursing Administration, 5, 11-14. Blanzola, C., Lindeman, R., & King, M. (2004). Nurse internship pathway to clinical comfort, confidence, and competency. Journal of Nurses for Staff Development, 20(1), pp 27-37. Brasler, M. (1993). Predictors of clinical performance of new graduate nurses participating in preceptor orientation programs. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 24(4), 158-165. Bumgarner. S, & Biggerstaff , G. (2000). A patient centered approach to nurse orientation. Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, 16(6), pp 249-256. Casey, K., Fink, R., Krugman, M. & Propst, J. (2004). The graduate nurse experience. Journal of Nursing Administration, 34(6), pp 303-311. Dear, M., Celentano. D., Weisman, C., & Keen, M. (November, 1982). Evaluating a hospital nursing internship. Journal of...[Please contact the primary investigator for additional references.]
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Nurse Residency Program on Self-Reported Confidenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoe, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Roseannen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuchene, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Roe, MS, APRN, BC, CEN, St. Joseph Hospital, Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, email: droe@sjhnh.org; Roseann Barrett, PhD, RN; Pamela Duchene, PhD, APRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182580-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: In an effort to retain new graduate RNs and assist in practice transition, areas new RNs do not feel confident or competent in are imperative to identify. With mounting evidence of a continued nursing shortage and the aging workforce it is important to investigate ways to improve onboarding of new RNs nurses. One strategy is through formal Nurse Residency Programs (NRP). In a pilot study of graduate RNs in a formalized NRP, self-confidence and confidence were investigated. Data was collected over a 2-yr period. RNs enrolled in the NRP were asked to rate perceived confidence on a scale of 0=none to 4=able to teach others in 11 areas of nursing activity: critical thinking, goal setting, plans of care, time management, organization, computer skills, discharge planning, documentation, patient/family education, communication skills, and cultural diversity. There was statistically significant improvement in perceived confidence in all activities resident except plans of care, time management, and organization after completion of the NRP. The nursing activity with the highest preNRP score for confidence (mean 2.6, SD = .68) was communication skills. Confidence in discharge planning was rated the lowest by the residents (1.4, SD= .80) prior to the NRP. The most improvement in nurse residents' mean perceived confidence scores was in discharge planning, documentation, computer skills, patient/family education, and cultural diversity. Residents rated perceived confidence scale in 52 specific clinical skills from 0=none to 4=able to teach. There were statistically significant differences in residents' mean scores before and after the NRP for the following four groupings of critical clinical skills: medication administration (t=-6.8, df=20, p=.000),IV therapy (t=-6.8, df =20, p=.000), physical assessments (t= -4.5, df=20, p=.000), and handling emergencies (t= -4.2., df=20, p=.000). This study yielded data helping to determine what, if any relationship exists between new graduate RN's enrolled...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Almada, P., Carafoli, K., Flattery, J. French, D., & McNamara, M. (2004). Improving the retention rate of newly graduated nurses. Journal of Nurses in Staff Development 20(6), pp 268-273. American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2002). AACN white paper: Hallmarks of the professional nursing practice environment, January 2002 @ http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Publications/positions/hallmarks.htm. Bartlett, H., Simonite, V., Westcott, E., & Taylor, H. (2000). A comparison of the nursing competence of graduates and diplomates from UK nursing programs. Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 9, pp 369-381. Beecroft, P., Kunzman, L. & Krozek, C. (2001). RN internship; outcomes of a one-year pilot program. Journal of Nursing Administration, 31(12), pp 575-582. Beeman, K., Jernigan, A., & Hensley, P. (1999). Employing new grads: a plan for success. Nursing Economics, 17(2), pp 91-95. Benner, P. (1984) From novice to expert; excellence and power in clinical nursing practice. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company Inc. Ca. Benner, P., & Wrubel, J. (1982). Skilled clinical knowledge: the value of perceptual awareness. Part 1. Journal of Nursing Administration, 5, 11-14. Blanzola, C., Lindeman, R., & King, M. (2004). Nurse internship pathway to clinical comfort, confidence, and competency. Journal of Nurses for Staff Development, 20(1), pp 27-37. Brasler, M. (1993). Predictors of clinical performance of new graduate nurses participating in preceptor orientation programs. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 24(4), 158-165. Bumgarner. S, & Biggerstaff , G. (2000). A patient centered approach to nurse orientation. Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, 16(6), pp 249-256. Casey, K., Fink, R., Krugman, M. & Propst, J. (2004). The graduate nurse experience. Journal of Nursing Administration, 34(6), pp 303-311. Dear, M., Celentano. D., Weisman, C., & Keen, M. (November, 1982). Evaluating a hospital nursing internship. Journal of...[Please contact the primary investigator for additional references.]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:30:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:30:34Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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