2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182585
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What is Quality Nursing Care from the Children's Perspective?
Author(s):
Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A.
Author Details:
Nancy Ryan-Wenger, PhD, CPNP, FAAN, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Canal Winchester, Ohio, USA, email: nancy.ryanwenger@nationwidechildrens.org
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This cross-sectional descriptive study obtains information from children about the positive and negative aspects of their experience with nurses during their hospital stay, and the immediate physical, psychological and social outcomes of their nursing care. ABSTRACT: Over 3 million children in the U.S. are hospitalized annually (NACHRI, 2008), but children remain "silent consumers of care" (Carter 1998). Pediatric Patient Satisfaction scales are used to evaluate quality of care, yet are typically retrospective, directed to parents, and mostly relate to parents' experiences. In a metaanalysis of 119 studies, the average correlation between parent-report and child-report was only 0.22 (Achenbach, 1987). Nearly half of hospitalized children are =6 years old and are fully capable of reporting on their own experiences, and need a satisfaction scale of their own (Beal, 2004; Lindeke, et al., 2006; Shaller, 2004). This cross-sectional descriptive study obtains information from children about their experiences with nursing care during their hospital stay, and immediate physical, psychological and social outcomes of their nursing care. Inclusion criteria are ages 6-21 years, hospitalized =24 hours, parental consent and child assent. A sample of 190 subjects is required for adequate power (Cohen, 1988). The results from the first 100 subjects are reported here (200 subjects will be available by July 1, 2008). The current sample is 6-21 years old, 50.4% male, 77% white, 22% Black. In structured interviews, children reported on the best thing about their nurses: they were friendly-36%, met the children's needs-33%, communicated-13%, provided comfort-8%, were responsive-5%, and gave them choices-6%. Children reported that the worst thing was that nurses administered painful procedures-40%, enforced therapeutic interventions such as isolation and bedrest-31%, woke or disturbed them-12%, did not meet their needs-8%, delayed pain medications-4%, caused unnecessary pain-2%, and were not friendly-2%. After recalling a positive thing that a nurse did, children reported that they felt happy-43%, good-24%, comfortable-11%, better-11%, important-8% and secure-3%. When children rated their nurses on a scale of 0 to 5, scores were 5 (70%), 4 (25%) and 3 (5%). Quality of Life (QOL)-Present Functioning scores (Sherman, et al, 2006) at the time of the interview ranged from 0 to 19 (mean=4.96, SD=4.47); 25% of the children scored 0 (high QOL) and 7% scored = 2SD. Correlations between QOL, anxiety, depression (Chorpita, 2000) and specific aspects of nursing care that are most salient to children will reveal the linkages between pediatric nursing care processes and the quality of patient outcomes. REFERENCES: Achenbach, T., McConaughy, S., & Howell, C. (1987). "Child/adolescent behavior and emotional problems: Implications of cross-informant correlations for situational specificity." Psychological Bulletin 101: 213-232. Beal, A., C., Patrick, J., Dougherty, D., Jorsing, T., Kam, J., Perrin, J., & Palmer, H. (2004). "Quality measures for children's health care." Pediatrics 113([Suppl]): 199-209. Carter, B. (1998). "Chronic pain in childhood and the medical encounter: Professional ventriloquism and hidden voices. ." Qualitative Health Research 12: 28-41. Chorpita, B. F., Yim, L., Moffitt, C. E., Umemoto, L. A., & Francis, S. E. (2000). Assessment of symptoms of DSM-IV anxiety and depression in children A Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 38 (2000), pp. 835û855. Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences. Hillsdale, NJ, Erlbaum. Lindeke, L., Nakai, M., & Johnson, L. (2006). "Capturing children's voices for quality improvement." MCN: American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, 31: 290-295. Shaller, D. (2004). "Implementing and using quality measures for children's health care: Perspectives on the state of the practice." Pediatrics 113(1): 217-227. Sherman, S. A., Eisen, S., Burwinkle, T. M., & Varni, J. W. (2006). "The PedsQL Present Functioning Visual Analog Scales: Preliminary reliability and validity." Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 4: 75.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat is Quality Nursing Care from the Children's Perspective?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan-Wenger, Nancy A.en_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Ryan-Wenger, PhD, CPNP, FAAN, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Canal Winchester, Ohio, USA, email: nancy.ryanwenger@nationwidechildrens.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182585-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This cross-sectional descriptive study obtains information from children about the positive and negative aspects of their experience with nurses during their hospital stay, and the immediate physical, psychological and social outcomes of their nursing care. ABSTRACT: Over 3 million children in the U.S. are hospitalized annually (NACHRI, 2008), but children remain "silent consumers of care" (Carter 1998). Pediatric Patient Satisfaction scales are used to evaluate quality of care, yet are typically retrospective, directed to parents, and mostly relate to parents' experiences. In a metaanalysis of 119 studies, the average correlation between parent-report and child-report was only 0.22 (Achenbach, 1987). Nearly half of hospitalized children are =6 years old and are fully capable of reporting on their own experiences, and need a satisfaction scale of their own (Beal, 2004; Lindeke, et al., 2006; Shaller, 2004). This cross-sectional descriptive study obtains information from children about their experiences with nursing care during their hospital stay, and immediate physical, psychological and social outcomes of their nursing care. Inclusion criteria are ages 6-21 years, hospitalized =24 hours, parental consent and child assent. A sample of 190 subjects is required for adequate power (Cohen, 1988). The results from the first 100 subjects are reported here (200 subjects will be available by July 1, 2008). The current sample is 6-21 years old, 50.4% male, 77% white, 22% Black. In structured interviews, children reported on the best thing about their nurses: they were friendly-36%, met the children's needs-33%, communicated-13%, provided comfort-8%, were responsive-5%, and gave them choices-6%. Children reported that the worst thing was that nurses administered painful procedures-40%, enforced therapeutic interventions such as isolation and bedrest-31%, woke or disturbed them-12%, did not meet their needs-8%, delayed pain medications-4%, caused unnecessary pain-2%, and were not friendly-2%. After recalling a positive thing that a nurse did, children reported that they felt happy-43%, good-24%, comfortable-11%, better-11%, important-8% and secure-3%. When children rated their nurses on a scale of 0 to 5, scores were 5 (70%), 4 (25%) and 3 (5%). Quality of Life (QOL)-Present Functioning scores (Sherman, et al, 2006) at the time of the interview ranged from 0 to 19 (mean=4.96, SD=4.47); 25% of the children scored 0 (high QOL) and 7% scored = 2SD. Correlations between QOL, anxiety, depression (Chorpita, 2000) and specific aspects of nursing care that are most salient to children will reveal the linkages between pediatric nursing care processes and the quality of patient outcomes. REFERENCES: Achenbach, T., McConaughy, S., & Howell, C. (1987). "Child/adolescent behavior and emotional problems: Implications of cross-informant correlations for situational specificity." Psychological Bulletin 101: 213-232. Beal, A., C., Patrick, J., Dougherty, D., Jorsing, T., Kam, J., Perrin, J., & Palmer, H. (2004). "Quality measures for children's health care." Pediatrics 113([Suppl]): 199-209. Carter, B. (1998). "Chronic pain in childhood and the medical encounter: Professional ventriloquism and hidden voices. ." Qualitative Health Research 12: 28-41. Chorpita, B. F., Yim, L., Moffitt, C. E., Umemoto, L. A., & Francis, S. E. (2000). Assessment of symptoms of DSM-IV anxiety and depression in children A Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 38 (2000), pp. 835û855. Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences. Hillsdale, NJ, Erlbaum. Lindeke, L., Nakai, M., & Johnson, L. (2006). "Capturing children's voices for quality improvement." MCN: American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, 31: 290-295. Shaller, D. (2004). "Implementing and using quality measures for children's health care: Perspectives on the state of the practice." Pediatrics 113(1): 217-227. Sherman, S. A., Eisen, S., Burwinkle, T. M., & Varni, J. W. (2006). "The PedsQL Present Functioning Visual Analog Scales: Preliminary reliability and validity." Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 4: 75.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:30:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:30:48Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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