2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182587
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Satisfaction: Which Nurse Characteristics Matter Most?
Author(s):
Sanders, Robin; Hillman, Diane; Stokes, Sara
Author Details:
Robin Sanders, M.A., Morehead Associates, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA, email: rsanders@moreheadassociates.com; Diane Hillman, DHA, University of Virginia Health System; Sara Stokes, PhD
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This study provides new understanding about the relationship between nurse characteristics, demographics, work attitudes, and patient satisfaction. The presentation will include potential courses of action to improve both nurse and patient satisfaction. ABSTRACT: Most healthcare organizations are seeking new approaches to improve safety and patient satisfaction. Though many factors influence these important outcomes, researchers have concluded that nurse characteristics such as job satisfaction and job burnout have a significant impact on patient safety and quality of care (1). Much of the research on this nurse to patient outcome relationship has utilized nurses' perceived quality of care as the outcome measure; therefore more research is needed that is based on objective patient satisfaction data (2). This study seeks to provide new understanding about the relationship between nurse characteristics/demographics/work attitudes and patient satisfaction. Specifically, nurse characteristics of tenure and age as well as workplace attitudes about job stress and intention to leave will be analyzed to identify their relationship with reported levels of satisfaction from patients. We will look at these factors in terms of how they individually and collectively impact patient satisfaction. The RN sample includes approximately 1,500 nurses employed by a magnet-designated academic medical center. The presentation will include potential courses of action to improve both nurse and patient satisfaction. REFERENCES: 1 - IOM. 2004. Keeping Patients Safe, Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses 2 - Mick & Mark. 2005, The contribution of organization theory to nursing health services research. Nursing Outlook Nov-Dec;53(6) 317-23.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Satisfaction: Which Nurse Characteristics Matter Most?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.authorHillman, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorStokes, Saraen_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Sanders, M.A., Morehead Associates, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA, email: rsanders@moreheadassociates.com; Diane Hillman, DHA, University of Virginia Health System; Sara Stokes, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182587-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This study provides new understanding about the relationship between nurse characteristics, demographics, work attitudes, and patient satisfaction. The presentation will include potential courses of action to improve both nurse and patient satisfaction. ABSTRACT: Most healthcare organizations are seeking new approaches to improve safety and patient satisfaction. Though many factors influence these important outcomes, researchers have concluded that nurse characteristics such as job satisfaction and job burnout have a significant impact on patient safety and quality of care (1). Much of the research on this nurse to patient outcome relationship has utilized nurses' perceived quality of care as the outcome measure; therefore more research is needed that is based on objective patient satisfaction data (2). This study seeks to provide new understanding about the relationship between nurse characteristics/demographics/work attitudes and patient satisfaction. Specifically, nurse characteristics of tenure and age as well as workplace attitudes about job stress and intention to leave will be analyzed to identify their relationship with reported levels of satisfaction from patients. We will look at these factors in terms of how they individually and collectively impact patient satisfaction. The RN sample includes approximately 1,500 nurses employed by a magnet-designated academic medical center. The presentation will include potential courses of action to improve both nurse and patient satisfaction. REFERENCES: 1 - IOM. 2004. Keeping Patients Safe, Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses 2 - Mick & Mark. 2005, The contribution of organization theory to nursing health services research. Nursing Outlook Nov-Dec;53(6) 317-23.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:30:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:30:53Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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