2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182588
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Safety for Adult Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)
Author(s):
Schaller, Judy; Watkins, Karen
Author Details:
Judy Schaller, RN, MSN, CMSRN, Edward Hospital, Naperville, Illinois, USA, email: jschaller@edward.org; Karen Watkins, BSN, RN, CAPA
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: OSA is a common and treatable medical condition that affects more than 12 million people nationally. This disorder results in complete or partial airway collapse causing apnea and hypoxic episodes and may result in death. Surgical patients are at special risk because of the impact of anesthesia and analgesics. Many patients are not even aware that they have the disorder. It is important to identify patients at risk for OSA and implement protocols to care for patients with this disorder. This Magnet Hospital convened an interdisciplinary team to develop an algorithm that would identify patients at risk for OSA and direct care of the patient from Pre Admission Testing through discharge, including inpatient and outpatient surgery. The process begins with asking if a sleep study has ever been done. If yes, the protocol is initiated; if no, four specific screening questions are asked. A positive answer results in initiating a full questionnaire administered by the anesthesiologist. If a high probability of OSA exists, anesthesia determines an individualized plan of care for use by the surgical team and Post Anesthesia Care Unit. Patients admitted to the hospital after surgery are placed on a standardized OSA protocol developed by the interdisciplinary team. Throughout their stay and upon discharge, patients are given educational material about OSA and are encouraged to have a formal sleep study done when their physical condition permits. Implementation of the algorithm has resulted in an increased identification of patients at risk and has insured safe and timely care across the continuum from pre-admission to discharge. Every patient is actively involved in the plan of care and post-discharge needs.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Safety for Adult Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchaller, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorWatkins, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsJudy Schaller, RN, MSN, CMSRN, Edward Hospital, Naperville, Illinois, USA, email: jschaller@edward.org; Karen Watkins, BSN, RN, CAPAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182588-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: OSA is a common and treatable medical condition that affects more than 12 million people nationally. This disorder results in complete or partial airway collapse causing apnea and hypoxic episodes and may result in death. Surgical patients are at special risk because of the impact of anesthesia and analgesics. Many patients are not even aware that they have the disorder. It is important to identify patients at risk for OSA and implement protocols to care for patients with this disorder. This Magnet Hospital convened an interdisciplinary team to develop an algorithm that would identify patients at risk for OSA and direct care of the patient from Pre Admission Testing through discharge, including inpatient and outpatient surgery. The process begins with asking if a sleep study has ever been done. If yes, the protocol is initiated; if no, four specific screening questions are asked. A positive answer results in initiating a full questionnaire administered by the anesthesiologist. If a high probability of OSA exists, anesthesia determines an individualized plan of care for use by the surgical team and Post Anesthesia Care Unit. Patients admitted to the hospital after surgery are placed on a standardized OSA protocol developed by the interdisciplinary team. Throughout their stay and upon discharge, patients are given educational material about OSA and are encouraged to have a formal sleep study done when their physical condition permits. Implementation of the algorithm has resulted in an increased identification of patients at risk and has insured safe and timely care across the continuum from pre-admission to discharge. Every patient is actively involved in the plan of care and post-discharge needs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:30:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:30:56Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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