2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182591
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Causes and Correlates of Medication Errors and Acute Care Medical Nurses
Author(s):
Sellers, Kathleen
Author Details:
Kathleen Sellers, PhD, RN, Bassett Healthcare, Cooperstown, New York, USA, email: sellerk@sunyit.edu
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: According to the IOM (July 2006), medication errors in hospitals are common and can occur during any step in the process from procurement of the drug to documentation of administration. However, it is difficult to get accurate measurements of how often and how preventable errors occur. Internal data suggest that nurses play a significant role in medication errors through incorrect transcription/verification of an order, incorrect administration of the medication, and/or inaccurate documentation. The correlates and factors contributing to these errors remain unknown thus making it difficult to systematically address the problem. Guided by Benner's theory of Novice to Expert (Benner, 1982) this pilot study attempts to better understand the factors associated with specific clinician demographics and medication errors in a 6-month retrospective review of errors occurring on an acute care medical unit. Research questions: 1) What is the relationship between the type and number of medication errors committed by an acute care nurse and the nurse's age, professional status, level of nursing education, years in current role, work status, hours worked at the time of the error, number of consecutive days worked prior to the error, work experience, and unit productivity at the time of the incident (Pearson's Correlation)? 2) How much of the variance in type and number of medication errors can be attributed to each factor (Multiple Logistic Regression)? 3) Is there a statistically significant difference in the type of medication errors committed(ANOVAs)? and 4) Is there a statistically significant difference in the number of medication errors committed (Frequency and Chi Square Analysis)? The study employs a non-experimental, comparative-correlational design. We are in the process of data analysis currently, but preliminary findings indicate that 76% of the errors occurred when unit productivity was above 100%. Also, a percentage of errors were related to one-time orders...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: IOM (July 2006) Benner's Novice to Expert and Fatigue Theory(Benner, 1982).
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCauses and Correlates of Medication Errors and Acute Care Medical Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSellers, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Sellers, PhD, RN, Bassett Healthcare, Cooperstown, New York, USA, email: sellerk@sunyit.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182591-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: According to the IOM (July 2006), medication errors in hospitals are common and can occur during any step in the process from procurement of the drug to documentation of administration. However, it is difficult to get accurate measurements of how often and how preventable errors occur. Internal data suggest that nurses play a significant role in medication errors through incorrect transcription/verification of an order, incorrect administration of the medication, and/or inaccurate documentation. The correlates and factors contributing to these errors remain unknown thus making it difficult to systematically address the problem. Guided by Benner's theory of Novice to Expert (Benner, 1982) this pilot study attempts to better understand the factors associated with specific clinician demographics and medication errors in a 6-month retrospective review of errors occurring on an acute care medical unit. Research questions: 1) What is the relationship between the type and number of medication errors committed by an acute care nurse and the nurse's age, professional status, level of nursing education, years in current role, work status, hours worked at the time of the error, number of consecutive days worked prior to the error, work experience, and unit productivity at the time of the incident (Pearson's Correlation)? 2) How much of the variance in type and number of medication errors can be attributed to each factor (Multiple Logistic Regression)? 3) Is there a statistically significant difference in the type of medication errors committed(ANOVAs)? and 4) Is there a statistically significant difference in the number of medication errors committed (Frequency and Chi Square Analysis)? The study employs a non-experimental, comparative-correlational design. We are in the process of data analysis currently, but preliminary findings indicate that 76% of the errors occurred when unit productivity was above 100%. Also, a percentage of errors were related to one-time orders...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: IOM (July 2006) Benner's Novice to Expert and Fatigue Theory(Benner, 1982).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:31:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:31:04Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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