2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182595
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient/Parent Satisfaction with Nitrous Oxide During Lumbar Punctures
Author(s):
Slagerman, Kathleen; Livingston, Mylynda
Author Details:
Kathleen Slagerman, RN, CPON, Childrens Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minneapolis, USA, email: kathleen.slagerman@childrensmn.org; Mylynda Livingston, RN, MS, CNP
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Treatment related pain has been reported as a common source of physical and emotional distress in children with cancer. (Hedstrom, Haglund, Skolin, & vonEssen, 2003; Collins et al., 2000; Woodgate, Degner, & Yanofsky, 2003) Nitrous Oxide (N2O) is an anesthetic gas that has been used for many painful medical and dental procedures and is effective in reducing pain and anxiety in pediatric patients. (Kanagasundaram, Lane, Cavalletto, Keneally, Cooper, 2001; Burnweit et al., 2004) At our institution, most pediatric oncology lumbar punctures (LP) are done under deep sedation using Propofol or conscious sedation using combinations of a benzodiazepine and a narcotic. We completed a nurse directed, randomized, crossover, pilot study in our outpatient clinic to compare N2O to Standard Conscious Sedation (SCS) to treat pain during LP. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in the efficacy of N2O compared to SCS. Subjects were randomized to receive N2O or standard sedation at their first study LP and the other form of sedation at their second study LP. Two nurses evaluated 12 subjects during this study by measuring pain, distress, ease of procedure, patient and parent satisfaction, side effects, and length of procedure at the two study visits. Patient and parent satisfaction were high, with more patients and parents preferring N2O. Using the t-test, the data showed the clinic visit time was significantly shorter using N2O: 34 minutes for N2O and 57 minutes for SCS. The side effects were similar and pain control was equivalent using N2O and SCS. All 12 subjects who received N2O returned to normal activity within an hour of leaving the clinic, whereas 3 subjects who received SCS required longer than one hour. Nitrous oxide is an effective pain management intervention for children undergoing lumbar punctures during cancer treatment. REFERENCES: Burnweit C, Diana-Zerpa JA, Nahmad MH, Lankau CA, Weinberger M, Malvezzi L, Smith L, Shapiro T, Thayer K (2004). Nitrous oxide analgesia for minor pediatric surgical procedures: an effective alternative to conscious sedation? Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 39, 495-499. Collins, J. J., Byrnes, M. E., Dunkel, I. J., Lapin, J., Nadel, T., Thaler, H. T., et al. (2000). The measurement of symptoms in children with cancer. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 19, 363-373. Hedstrom, M., Haglund, K., Skolin, I., & Von Essen, L (2003). Distressing events for children and adolescents with cancer: child, parent, and nurse perceptions. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 20, 120-132. Kanagasundaram SA, Lane LJ, Cavalletto BP, Keneally JP, Cooper MG (2001). Efficacy and safety of nitrous oxide in alleviating pain and distress during painful procedures. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 84, 492-495. Woodgate, R.L., Degner, L.R., & Yanofsky, R. (2003). A different perspective to approaching cancer symptoms in children. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 26, 800-817.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient/Parent Satisfaction with Nitrous Oxide During Lumbar Puncturesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSlagerman, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorLivingston, Mylyndaen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Slagerman, RN, CPON, Childrens Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minneapolis, USA, email: kathleen.slagerman@childrensmn.org; Mylynda Livingston, RN, MS, CNPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182595-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Treatment related pain has been reported as a common source of physical and emotional distress in children with cancer. (Hedstrom, Haglund, Skolin, & vonEssen, 2003; Collins et al., 2000; Woodgate, Degner, & Yanofsky, 2003) Nitrous Oxide (N2O) is an anesthetic gas that has been used for many painful medical and dental procedures and is effective in reducing pain and anxiety in pediatric patients. (Kanagasundaram, Lane, Cavalletto, Keneally, Cooper, 2001; Burnweit et al., 2004) At our institution, most pediatric oncology lumbar punctures (LP) are done under deep sedation using Propofol or conscious sedation using combinations of a benzodiazepine and a narcotic. We completed a nurse directed, randomized, crossover, pilot study in our outpatient clinic to compare N2O to Standard Conscious Sedation (SCS) to treat pain during LP. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in the efficacy of N2O compared to SCS. Subjects were randomized to receive N2O or standard sedation at their first study LP and the other form of sedation at their second study LP. Two nurses evaluated 12 subjects during this study by measuring pain, distress, ease of procedure, patient and parent satisfaction, side effects, and length of procedure at the two study visits. Patient and parent satisfaction were high, with more patients and parents preferring N2O. Using the t-test, the data showed the clinic visit time was significantly shorter using N2O: 34 minutes for N2O and 57 minutes for SCS. The side effects were similar and pain control was equivalent using N2O and SCS. All 12 subjects who received N2O returned to normal activity within an hour of leaving the clinic, whereas 3 subjects who received SCS required longer than one hour. Nitrous oxide is an effective pain management intervention for children undergoing lumbar punctures during cancer treatment. REFERENCES: Burnweit C, Diana-Zerpa JA, Nahmad MH, Lankau CA, Weinberger M, Malvezzi L, Smith L, Shapiro T, Thayer K (2004). Nitrous oxide analgesia for minor pediatric surgical procedures: an effective alternative to conscious sedation? Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 39, 495-499. Collins, J. J., Byrnes, M. E., Dunkel, I. J., Lapin, J., Nadel, T., Thaler, H. T., et al. (2000). The measurement of symptoms in children with cancer. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 19, 363-373. Hedstrom, M., Haglund, K., Skolin, I., & Von Essen, L (2003). Distressing events for children and adolescents with cancer: child, parent, and nurse perceptions. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 20, 120-132. Kanagasundaram SA, Lane LJ, Cavalletto BP, Keneally JP, Cooper MG (2001). Efficacy and safety of nitrous oxide in alleviating pain and distress during painful procedures. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 84, 492-495. Woodgate, R.L., Degner, L.R., & Yanofsky, R. (2003). A different perspective to approaching cancer symptoms in children. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 26, 800-817.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:31:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:31:15Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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