2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182596
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating the Structure to Transform Clinical Practice with Information Systems
Author(s):
Smith, Janis
Author Details:
Janis Smith, RN, MSN, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: jbsmith@cmh.edu
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Adoption of an integrated clinical information system requires an organization to transform itself in order to realize the improvements. This session will address how the clinical work processes is impacted and describe a structure that brings together clinical end-users, decision makers, and technical staff for successful transformation. ABSTRACT: Integrated clinical information systems (CIS) are identified as key to improving patient care quality and safety. While studies have shown genuine benefits of CIS implementation, they also demonstrate their complexity and their potential for harm when not designed or implemented well. 1. Failure is estimated to occur with 50 - 70 percent of CIS implementations. 2. Fortunately, complete failure is rare, but even suboptimal use should not be tolerated when the costs of system purchase, development, and implementation are considered. The expected benefits of a new technology may not be realized if the technology is not designed appropriately or does not fit within the system that is to use it. Successfully implementing a CIS depends equally on the context of the organizational system and the specific technology. Adoption of an integrated CIS requires an organization to transform itself, as the system will touch almost every aspect of the organization and impact every direct care provider. When our organization made the decision to replace a number of disparate and disconnected electronic and paper-based information systems with one integrated CIS we realized that a structure for decision making and implementation planning was crucial. Development and deployment of our CIS is guided by committees that are inter-related, but have clear boundaries and responsibilities. Leading the work is an Approval committee, comprised of organizational leaders who have final authority to accept or reject system development, proposed work processes, and implementation plans. This group has a unique responsibility to assure that decisions made in one clinical area do not adversely impact another. A Quality committee is charged to evaluate the impact of the CIS on immediate and longer term clinical and organizational processes and outcomes. A Public Relations committee held contests to name the CIS, develop its symbols, and so on. An Education committee has developed training scripts and planned the education of super-users and end-users across the organization. Implementation teams plan for the hardware needs, work process changes, and other details of area-specific implementation. Direct care nurses are active participants on all the committees. This session will provide detailed information on the strategies we employed to maximize a successful integrated CIS implementation and our organizational transformation. REFERENCES: 1. Chaudhry, B. Wang, J., Shinyi, W., Maglione, M., Mojica, W., Roth, E., Morton, S.C., & Shelkelle, P.G. (2006). Systematic review: impact of health information technology on quality, efficiency, and costs of medical care. Annals of Internal Medicine, 144, 742-752. 2. Lorenzi NM, Smith JB, Conner SR, Campion TR. The Success Factor Profile for clinical computer innovation. Medinfo. 2004;11(Pt 2):1077-80.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating the Structure to Transform Clinical Practice with Information Systemsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Janisen_US
dc.author.detailsJanis Smith, RN, MSN, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: jbsmith@cmh.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182596-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Adoption of an integrated clinical information system requires an organization to transform itself in order to realize the improvements. This session will address how the clinical work processes is impacted and describe a structure that brings together clinical end-users, decision makers, and technical staff for successful transformation. ABSTRACT: Integrated clinical information systems (CIS) are identified as key to improving patient care quality and safety. While studies have shown genuine benefits of CIS implementation, they also demonstrate their complexity and their potential for harm when not designed or implemented well. 1. Failure is estimated to occur with 50 - 70 percent of CIS implementations. 2. Fortunately, complete failure is rare, but even suboptimal use should not be tolerated when the costs of system purchase, development, and implementation are considered. The expected benefits of a new technology may not be realized if the technology is not designed appropriately or does not fit within the system that is to use it. Successfully implementing a CIS depends equally on the context of the organizational system and the specific technology. Adoption of an integrated CIS requires an organization to transform itself, as the system will touch almost every aspect of the organization and impact every direct care provider. When our organization made the decision to replace a number of disparate and disconnected electronic and paper-based information systems with one integrated CIS we realized that a structure for decision making and implementation planning was crucial. Development and deployment of our CIS is guided by committees that are inter-related, but have clear boundaries and responsibilities. Leading the work is an Approval committee, comprised of organizational leaders who have final authority to accept or reject system development, proposed work processes, and implementation plans. This group has a unique responsibility to assure that decisions made in one clinical area do not adversely impact another. A Quality committee is charged to evaluate the impact of the CIS on immediate and longer term clinical and organizational processes and outcomes. A Public Relations committee held contests to name the CIS, develop its symbols, and so on. An Education committee has developed training scripts and planned the education of super-users and end-users across the organization. Implementation teams plan for the hardware needs, work process changes, and other details of area-specific implementation. Direct care nurses are active participants on all the committees. This session will provide detailed information on the strategies we employed to maximize a successful integrated CIS implementation and our organizational transformation. REFERENCES: 1. Chaudhry, B. Wang, J., Shinyi, W., Maglione, M., Mojica, W., Roth, E., Morton, S.C., & Shelkelle, P.G. (2006). Systematic review: impact of health information technology on quality, efficiency, and costs of medical care. Annals of Internal Medicine, 144, 742-752. 2. Lorenzi NM, Smith JB, Conner SR, Campion TR. The Success Factor Profile for clinical computer innovation. Medinfo. 2004;11(Pt 2):1077-80.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:31:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:31:18Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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