2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182599
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Performance Metrics of Hospital-Based Nursing Research Programs
Author(s):
Speroni, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Speroni, PhD, RN, Inova Loudoun Hospital, Leesburg, Virginia, USA, email: kgabelsperoni@smartneighborhood.net
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Results of a performance metrics pilot study for the development of hospital based nursing research programs and program infrastructure will be discussed. Nursing research activities will be presented, such as average number of nursing studies initiated, published, research leader hours worked, Magnet status, and bed size. ABSTRACT: The development of a hospital based nursing research program may follow different avenues. One direct route is that guided by a leader knowledgeable in research and supported by a visionary chief nurse. Many hospitals have conducted nursing research but few have research leaders and an infrastructure to develop, grow and sustain a program. Reasons for not having a program are often related to finances and availability of experienced research leaders. A pilot survey was conducted to identify nursing research institutional related factors regarding the development of nursing research programs. The purpose of the survey was to provide information to help guide hospitals interested in establishing nursing research programs or maintaining existing programs. Practical application of the development of one hospital's research program and infrastructure will be contrasted to results of the pilot survey. Performance metrics of hospital's nursing research activities will be discussed. Detailed information on how to develop, grow and sustain an active nursing research program and infrastructure will be provided. Pilot survey results are inclusive of a convenience sample of approximately 20 Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. Research leaders were asked to provide annual data for years 2003-2007 for each of the following: Number of nurse initiated Institutional Review Board reviewed studies started; number of studies published; number of study abstracts or posters presented; number of study podium presentations; and the average of hours worked per week by a nurse research leader. Hospitals were also asked to specify, if applicable, year of Magnet recognition; the year a research program was formally initiated; the highest education level for the research leader; and the number of hospital beds. One Magnet hospital developed a research program and initiated 18 studies over a four year period. The performance results of this program included six studies published, 19 poster abstracts and eight podium presentations conducted at local and national meetings. The research leader worked on average 18 hours per week in the less than 200 bed hospital. The infrastructure for this research program included monthly Research Council meetings, formal training in conduct of research, nurse research internship programs, best research idea contests, and poster symposiums. This hospital also conducted the pilot survey for which results will be contrasted.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerformance Metrics of Hospital-Based Nursing Research Programsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSperoni, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Speroni, PhD, RN, Inova Loudoun Hospital, Leesburg, Virginia, USA, email: kgabelsperoni@smartneighborhood.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182599-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Results of a performance metrics pilot study for the development of hospital based nursing research programs and program infrastructure will be discussed. Nursing research activities will be presented, such as average number of nursing studies initiated, published, research leader hours worked, Magnet status, and bed size. ABSTRACT: The development of a hospital based nursing research program may follow different avenues. One direct route is that guided by a leader knowledgeable in research and supported by a visionary chief nurse. Many hospitals have conducted nursing research but few have research leaders and an infrastructure to develop, grow and sustain a program. Reasons for not having a program are often related to finances and availability of experienced research leaders. A pilot survey was conducted to identify nursing research institutional related factors regarding the development of nursing research programs. The purpose of the survey was to provide information to help guide hospitals interested in establishing nursing research programs or maintaining existing programs. Practical application of the development of one hospital's research program and infrastructure will be contrasted to results of the pilot survey. Performance metrics of hospital's nursing research activities will be discussed. Detailed information on how to develop, grow and sustain an active nursing research program and infrastructure will be provided. Pilot survey results are inclusive of a convenience sample of approximately 20 Magnet and non-Magnet hospitals. Research leaders were asked to provide annual data for years 2003-2007 for each of the following: Number of nurse initiated Institutional Review Board reviewed studies started; number of studies published; number of study abstracts or posters presented; number of study podium presentations; and the average of hours worked per week by a nurse research leader. Hospitals were also asked to specify, if applicable, year of Magnet recognition; the year a research program was formally initiated; the highest education level for the research leader; and the number of hospital beds. One Magnet hospital developed a research program and initiated 18 studies over a four year period. The performance results of this program included six studies published, 19 poster abstracts and eight podium presentations conducted at local and national meetings. The research leader worked on average 18 hours per week in the less than 200 bed hospital. The infrastructure for this research program included monthly Research Council meetings, formal training in conduct of research, nurse research internship programs, best research idea contests, and poster symposiums. This hospital also conducted the pilot survey for which results will be contrasted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:31:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:31:26Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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