2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182603
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Staff Led Problem-Based Cases and Critical Thinking of New Graduates
Author(s):
Stotts, James; Collins, Todd
Author Details:
James Stotts, RN, MS, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, California, USA, email: jstotts@stanfordmed.org; Todd Collins, RN, BS
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This presentation describes the process and outcomes of utilizing problem-based learning to facilitate the critical thinking skills of new graduates in the early detection and response to hospital complications. Staff involvement in program development, teaching, and evaluation is highlighted. ABSTRACT: Description Early detection and response to hospital complications is pivotal for a hospital's rapid response system to improve patient outcomes. Evidence supports that new graduate nurses (NGN) do not possess the level of critical thinking skills needed in today's fast-paced, high acuity hospital settings. Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method that is inquiry-based using problems to acquire and integrate new knowledge. PBL has been shown to improve critical thinking skills in undergraduate nursing students and new graduate nurses. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of PBL on the critical thinking skills of NGN in the early detection and response to hospital complications. An 8-hour course was developed during which clinical cases of hospital complications were revealed to participants using the technique of progressive disclosure. Case finding and development was completed by staff and advanced clinical experts. Each case was divided into stages: problem onset, full problem manifestation, immediate intervention and problem resolution. Facilitator lead questions prompted participants to collaborate to define the problem, determine causes, interventions and reflect on missed diagnoses and prevention strategies. Distractors were embedded to mimic data overload of nursing practice. Selected cases were videotaped to highlight specific clinical presentations. Each student group was cohorted and limited to 10 students per facilitator. Additionally participants met for sessions to discuss video storytelling vignettes of expert nurses relaying details of cases involving hospital complications. Staff educators were trained in facilitation skills, with emphasis on student interaction and critical thinking versus didactic presentation. Pre/post-tests were used to measure critical thinking in relation to early detection and response to hospital complications. Results NGN had 12.4 +/- 0.7 months (mean +/- SD) of clinical experience (N=97). Mean test scores significantly increased between the pre-test (42.4% +/- 6.3) and post-test (78.3% +/- 3.8) (p<0.01). Course evaluations rated the learning environment as excellent, objectives met, cases as excellent. Conclusion The PBL course improved the critical thinking skills of NGN in the early detection and response to hospital complications. Post-test scores did not approach 100% which may reflect limitations in testing for critical thinking or how rapid improvements in critical thinking can be achieved. REFERENCES: Med Educ 2006; 40:547-554 J Adv Nurs 2004; 48:500-509. JONAS Healthc Law Ethics Regul 2006; 8:110-115.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Staff Led Problem-Based Cases and Critical Thinking of New Graduatesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStotts, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Todden_US
dc.author.detailsJames Stotts, RN, MS, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, California, USA, email: jstotts@stanfordmed.org; Todd Collins, RN, BSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182603-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This presentation describes the process and outcomes of utilizing problem-based learning to facilitate the critical thinking skills of new graduates in the early detection and response to hospital complications. Staff involvement in program development, teaching, and evaluation is highlighted. ABSTRACT: Description Early detection and response to hospital complications is pivotal for a hospital's rapid response system to improve patient outcomes. Evidence supports that new graduate nurses (NGN) do not possess the level of critical thinking skills needed in today's fast-paced, high acuity hospital settings. Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method that is inquiry-based using problems to acquire and integrate new knowledge. PBL has been shown to improve critical thinking skills in undergraduate nursing students and new graduate nurses. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of PBL on the critical thinking skills of NGN in the early detection and response to hospital complications. An 8-hour course was developed during which clinical cases of hospital complications were revealed to participants using the technique of progressive disclosure. Case finding and development was completed by staff and advanced clinical experts. Each case was divided into stages: problem onset, full problem manifestation, immediate intervention and problem resolution. Facilitator lead questions prompted participants to collaborate to define the problem, determine causes, interventions and reflect on missed diagnoses and prevention strategies. Distractors were embedded to mimic data overload of nursing practice. Selected cases were videotaped to highlight specific clinical presentations. Each student group was cohorted and limited to 10 students per facilitator. Additionally participants met for sessions to discuss video storytelling vignettes of expert nurses relaying details of cases involving hospital complications. Staff educators were trained in facilitation skills, with emphasis on student interaction and critical thinking versus didactic presentation. Pre/post-tests were used to measure critical thinking in relation to early detection and response to hospital complications. Results NGN had 12.4 +/- 0.7 months (mean +/- SD) of clinical experience (N=97). Mean test scores significantly increased between the pre-test (42.4% +/- 6.3) and post-test (78.3% +/- 3.8) (p&lt;0.01). Course evaluations rated the learning environment as excellent, objectives met, cases as excellent. Conclusion The PBL course improved the critical thinking skills of NGN in the early detection and response to hospital complications. Post-test scores did not approach 100% which may reflect limitations in testing for critical thinking or how rapid improvements in critical thinking can be achieved. REFERENCES: Med Educ 2006; 40:547-554 J Adv Nurs 2004; 48:500-509. JONAS Healthc Law Ethics Regul 2006; 8:110-115.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:31:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:31:37Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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