2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182604
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding and Improving Clinical Nursing Autonomy
Author(s):
Stotts, James; Sangha, Sukbinder
Author Details:
James Stotts, RN, MS, Stanford Hospital & Clinics, Stanford, California, USA, email: jstotts@stanfordmed.org; Sukbinder Sangha
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Purpose: Using a participatory action research methodology, the purpose of this study was to engage staff nurses in their understandings of clinical nursing autonomy and to identify potential strategies to improve their autonomy. Background: Over the past 5 years, autonomy was ranked as one of the lowest indicators on the NDNQI. However, observations by MagnetÖ appraisers identified that nurses had significant autonomy over their practice. The selected research methodology allowed staff nurses to investigate their peers' understandings of autonomy and to suggest strategies to improve autonomy to the Nursing Leadership. Methods: After obtaining IRB approval, the Nursing and Unit Councils advertised and collected exemplars from peer staff nurses asking three sets of questions: 1) What does autonomy mean to you? 2) Can you give me an example of when you have felt most autonomous? What contributed to your autonomy? 3) Can you give me an example of when you have felt you have had the least autonomy? What did you do or could have done to change the experience? What could the system do to help address this issue? The responses were collated, redacted, and given to the Research Council to analyze the data using content analysis. Themes were created. Recommendations for action were presented to the Nursing Leadership Council. Results: Preliminary analysis to the questions (Set 1: n=152; Set 2: n=165; Set 3: n=147) revealed that nurses believed autonomy means that they have decision making ability, control over their practice, utilize knowledge and expertise, know the limits of their practice, and can identifying solutions and having authority to act. Nurses perceived low autonomy when they were not valued in determining patient care plans, were not consulted in decisions about patient care equipment, or lacked knowledge or experience caring for certain patient populations. Preliminary recommendations for Nursing Leadership included streamlining how information...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.]
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding and Improving Clinical Nursing Autonomyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStotts, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorSangha, Sukbinderen_US
dc.author.detailsJames Stotts, RN, MS, Stanford Hospital & Clinics, Stanford, California, USA, email: jstotts@stanfordmed.org; Sukbinder Sanghaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182604-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Purpose: Using a participatory action research methodology, the purpose of this study was to engage staff nurses in their understandings of clinical nursing autonomy and to identify potential strategies to improve their autonomy. Background: Over the past 5 years, autonomy was ranked as one of the lowest indicators on the NDNQI. However, observations by MagnetÖ appraisers identified that nurses had significant autonomy over their practice. The selected research methodology allowed staff nurses to investigate their peers' understandings of autonomy and to suggest strategies to improve autonomy to the Nursing Leadership. Methods: After obtaining IRB approval, the Nursing and Unit Councils advertised and collected exemplars from peer staff nurses asking three sets of questions: 1) What does autonomy mean to you? 2) Can you give me an example of when you have felt most autonomous? What contributed to your autonomy? 3) Can you give me an example of when you have felt you have had the least autonomy? What did you do or could have done to change the experience? What could the system do to help address this issue? The responses were collated, redacted, and given to the Research Council to analyze the data using content analysis. Themes were created. Recommendations for action were presented to the Nursing Leadership Council. Results: Preliminary analysis to the questions (Set 1: n=152; Set 2: n=165; Set 3: n=147) revealed that nurses believed autonomy means that they have decision making ability, control over their practice, utilize knowledge and expertise, know the limits of their practice, and can identifying solutions and having authority to act. Nurses perceived low autonomy when they were not valued in determining patient care plans, were not consulted in decisions about patient care equipment, or lacked knowledge or experience caring for certain patient populations. Preliminary recommendations for Nursing Leadership included streamlining how information...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:31:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:31:39Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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