2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182611
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is There Life Beyond Data Collection? Moving PI Data into the Realm of Research
Author(s):
Turjanica, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Turjanica, RN, MSN, CRNP, St. Elizabeth Health Center, Youngstown, Ohio, USA, email: Mary_Turjanica@hmis.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Nurses collect a lot of data. Often, numbers become distanced from the patient care they represent. Nursing research council members sought to make the numbers more relevant to bedside caregivers. Their aim was to highlight the link between research and practice. A subcommittee was formed to develop a research study. Its purpose was to describe the incidence, severity, associated demographic and co-morbid variables, and interventions used to prevent pressure ulcers of the ear. Background: Four year results of a quarterly skin prevalence study revealed an increased incidence of pressure ulcers of the ear, from 2% to 12 %. Further investigation found numerous studies about pressure ulcers in general, but very few about those of the ear specifically. Methodology: A descriptive, correlational design was utilized to assess a convenience sample of 100 patients prescribed oxygen via nasal cannula tubing. The setting was a 42 bed, inpatient med-surg unit, at a level I trauma, teaching hospital in the Midwest. The data collection tool designed specifically for the study incorporated both the Braden scale and the staging of pressure ulcers (AHQR guidelines). Data sources included patient demographics, co-morbidities, interviews, and skin assessment by two nurses inspecting two areas on the subjects' ears. Analysis / Findings: Incidence of skin breakdown was 37 %, much greater than noted in the skin prevalence study. Only two patients had ear protectors in place. Stage I ulcers predominated. Of all variables surveyed, only lack of prior oxygen use via nasal cannula predicted the presence of ear pressure ulcers (Chi square = 6.113, p = 0.013). Implications: The main finding of the study indicated patients new to nasal cannula oxygen therapy were the most susceptible to skin breakdown. Nurses can intervene early by identifying pre-admission nasal cannula oxygen use, assessing peri-auricular skin condition, and initiating measures to preempt skin breakdown. Practice...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: 1. Thomas, D.R: Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers: What works? What doesn't? Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. Vol. 68, #8. 2001 2. Lepisto, M, Eriksson, E., Hietanen, H., Asko-Seljavaara, S: Prevention of pressure ulcers in acute and long-term care facilities in Finland: Results of a survey. Ostomy Wound Management. Vol. 46, #6, pp. 30-41, 2000. 3. Groeneveld, A., Anderson, M., Allen, S., Bressmer, S., Golberg, M., Magee, B., Milner, M., Young, S: The prevalence of pressure ulcers in a tertiary care pediatric and adult hospital. Journal of Wound Care. May/June, 2004 4. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 15: treatment of pressure ulcers. Rockville, Md: US Department of Health and Human Services, 1994. 5. Thomson, JS., Brooks, RG., The economics of preventing and treating pressure ulcers: a pilot study. Journal of Wound Care. Vol. 8, 312-216, 1999. 6. Allman, RM., The impact of pressure ulcers on health care costs and mortality. Adv. Wound Care. Vol. 11 (suppl) #2, 1998. 7. Allman, RM., Goode, PS., Burst, N., Bartolucci, AA., Thomas, DR., Pressure ulcers, hospital complications, and disease severity: impact on hospital costs and length of stay. Advances in Wound Care. Vol. 12:22-30, 1999. 8. National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. Pressure ulcers prevalence, cost and risk assessment: consensus development conference statement. Decubitus. Vol. 2, 24-28, 1989. 9. Gallager, SM., Outcomes in clinical practice: pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence studies. Ostomy/Wound Management. Vol. 43, 28-40, 1997. 10. Panel for the prediction and prevention of pressure ulcers in adults. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 3: Pressure Ulcers in Adults: prediction and Prevention. Rockville, Md: US Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. AHCPR Publication 92-0047, 1992. 11. Moore, S., Wise,L...[Please contact the primary investigator for additional references.]
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs There Life Beyond Data Collection? Moving PI Data into the Realm of Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTurjanica, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Turjanica, RN, MSN, CRNP, St. Elizabeth Health Center, Youngstown, Ohio, USA, email: Mary_Turjanica@hmis.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182611-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Nurses collect a lot of data. Often, numbers become distanced from the patient care they represent. Nursing research council members sought to make the numbers more relevant to bedside caregivers. Their aim was to highlight the link between research and practice. A subcommittee was formed to develop a research study. Its purpose was to describe the incidence, severity, associated demographic and co-morbid variables, and interventions used to prevent pressure ulcers of the ear. Background: Four year results of a quarterly skin prevalence study revealed an increased incidence of pressure ulcers of the ear, from 2% to 12 %. Further investigation found numerous studies about pressure ulcers in general, but very few about those of the ear specifically. Methodology: A descriptive, correlational design was utilized to assess a convenience sample of 100 patients prescribed oxygen via nasal cannula tubing. The setting was a 42 bed, inpatient med-surg unit, at a level I trauma, teaching hospital in the Midwest. The data collection tool designed specifically for the study incorporated both the Braden scale and the staging of pressure ulcers (AHQR guidelines). Data sources included patient demographics, co-morbidities, interviews, and skin assessment by two nurses inspecting two areas on the subjects' ears. Analysis / Findings: Incidence of skin breakdown was 37 %, much greater than noted in the skin prevalence study. Only two patients had ear protectors in place. Stage I ulcers predominated. Of all variables surveyed, only lack of prior oxygen use via nasal cannula predicted the presence of ear pressure ulcers (Chi square = 6.113, p = 0.013). Implications: The main finding of the study indicated patients new to nasal cannula oxygen therapy were the most susceptible to skin breakdown. Nurses can intervene early by identifying pre-admission nasal cannula oxygen use, assessing peri-auricular skin condition, and initiating measures to preempt skin breakdown. Practice...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: 1. Thomas, D.R: Prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers: What works? What doesn't? Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. Vol. 68, #8. 2001 2. Lepisto, M, Eriksson, E., Hietanen, H., Asko-Seljavaara, S: Prevention of pressure ulcers in acute and long-term care facilities in Finland: Results of a survey. Ostomy Wound Management. Vol. 46, #6, pp. 30-41, 2000. 3. Groeneveld, A., Anderson, M., Allen, S., Bressmer, S., Golberg, M., Magee, B., Milner, M., Young, S: The prevalence of pressure ulcers in a tertiary care pediatric and adult hospital. Journal of Wound Care. May/June, 2004 4. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 15: treatment of pressure ulcers. Rockville, Md: US Department of Health and Human Services, 1994. 5. Thomson, JS., Brooks, RG., The economics of preventing and treating pressure ulcers: a pilot study. Journal of Wound Care. Vol. 8, 312-216, 1999. 6. Allman, RM., The impact of pressure ulcers on health care costs and mortality. Adv. Wound Care. Vol. 11 (suppl) #2, 1998. 7. Allman, RM., Goode, PS., Burst, N., Bartolucci, AA., Thomas, DR., Pressure ulcers, hospital complications, and disease severity: impact on hospital costs and length of stay. Advances in Wound Care. Vol. 12:22-30, 1999. 8. National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. Pressure ulcers prevalence, cost and risk assessment: consensus development conference statement. Decubitus. Vol. 2, 24-28, 1989. 9. Gallager, SM., Outcomes in clinical practice: pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence studies. Ostomy/Wound Management. Vol. 43, 28-40, 1997. 10. Panel for the prediction and prevention of pressure ulcers in adults. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 3: Pressure Ulcers in Adults: prediction and Prevention. Rockville, Md: US Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service. Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. AHCPR Publication 92-0047, 1992. 11. Moore, S., Wise,L...[Please contact the primary investigator for additional references.]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:31:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:31:59Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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