2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182613
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Culturally Sensitive Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Patients
Author(s):
Vezina, Maria; Jaffe-Ruiz, Marilyn; Porter, Carol
Author Details:
Maria Vezina, EdD, RN, The Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York, USA, email: maria.vezina@mountsinai.org; Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz, EdD, RN, Pace University; Carol Porter, MPA, RN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Significance/Purpose: BSN graduates from diverse backgrounds are needed to meet the needs of our ever changing health care system. In addition, Magnet RNs need to develop sophisticated critical thinking & communication skills & cultural competence to meet the needs of vulnerable and underserved patients. The diversity of the workforce needs to mirror the diversity of the US populace. Cultural competence is likely to improve patient care and nurse satisfaction. To address these issues, a partnership was formed between a university-based school of nursing and an urban, academic, medical center. The purpose of this research was to: (1) include cultural diversity in the clinical practicum experience for students and clinical nurse mentors, and (2) promote cultural competence in undergraduate students, faculty, and the nursing workforce. Design/Methods: The study utilized a pre/post-test design. Undergraduate nursing students (N = 8) were chosen to participate after a blind review application process. Staff nurses (N = 13) from pediatric, obstetric, psychiatric, and med/surg units volunteered to participate. Students and nurses participated in an orientation followed by attendance at monthly seminars. Cultural competency was self-reported at the beginning and end of the project using the "Cultural Competency Self Assessment Exercise." Research Findings: Approximately one-third of the participants self-identified as non-Hispanic white (nurses 38.5%, n = 5; students 37.5%, n = 3) with the remaining from diverse backgrounds (African American, Hispanic, Haitian, Korean-American, and Philippine-American). At Time 1, students (median score: 56.5%) reported greater knowledge of cultural competency when compared to nurses (median score: 42.9%), while nurses reported more confidence caring for diverse patients (median score: nurses, 82.5%; students, 81.8%). At Time 2, knowledge increased in both groups (median score: nurses, 61.0%; students, 68.5%). Implications for...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.]
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCulturally Sensitive Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVezina, Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJaffe-Ruiz, Marilynen_US
dc.contributor.authorPorter, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsMaria Vezina, EdD, RN, The Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York, USA, email: maria.vezina@mountsinai.org; Marilyn Jaffe-Ruiz, EdD, RN, Pace University; Carol Porter, MPA, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182613-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Significance/Purpose: BSN graduates from diverse backgrounds are needed to meet the needs of our ever changing health care system. In addition, Magnet RNs need to develop sophisticated critical thinking & communication skills & cultural competence to meet the needs of vulnerable and underserved patients. The diversity of the workforce needs to mirror the diversity of the US populace. Cultural competence is likely to improve patient care and nurse satisfaction. To address these issues, a partnership was formed between a university-based school of nursing and an urban, academic, medical center. The purpose of this research was to: (1) include cultural diversity in the clinical practicum experience for students and clinical nurse mentors, and (2) promote cultural competence in undergraduate students, faculty, and the nursing workforce. Design/Methods: The study utilized a pre/post-test design. Undergraduate nursing students (N = 8) were chosen to participate after a blind review application process. Staff nurses (N = 13) from pediatric, obstetric, psychiatric, and med/surg units volunteered to participate. Students and nurses participated in an orientation followed by attendance at monthly seminars. Cultural competency was self-reported at the beginning and end of the project using the "Cultural Competency Self Assessment Exercise." Research Findings: Approximately one-third of the participants self-identified as non-Hispanic white (nurses 38.5%, n = 5; students 37.5%, n = 3) with the remaining from diverse backgrounds (African American, Hispanic, Haitian, Korean-American, and Philippine-American). At Time 1, students (median score: 56.5%) reported greater knowledge of cultural competency when compared to nurses (median score: 42.9%), while nurses reported more confidence caring for diverse patients (median score: nurses, 82.5%; students, 81.8%). At Time 2, knowledge increased in both groups (median score: nurses, 61.0%; students, 68.5%). Implications for...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:32:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:32:05Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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