2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182617
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Music Therapy as a Nursing Intervention for Inconsolability
Author(s):
Weaver, Barbara Smith; Keith, Douglas; Russell, Kendra
Author Details:
Barbara Smith Weaver, CCRN, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Lizella, Georgia, USA, email: cweaver@pstel.net; Douglas Keith, PhD, MT-BC; Kendra Russell, PhD, RN, Georgia College and State University
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Healthcare providers need to be aware that a preterm specific music therapy intervention is a method that nurses can use to make the transition from nothing-by-mouth status to feeding less stressful and improve physiological and psychosocial status of premature infants. This intervention can reduce crying frequency and duration in preterm babies. ABSTRACT: Over the decades, neonatal nurses have developed strategies to manage crying episodes of the critically ill and convalescing infant. These episodes of crying are not only stressful and upsetting to the parents, but they are also stressful and time consuming for the nurses caring for these infants. In our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NNICU) in a 600 bed teaching hospital, infants who were NPO became "inconsolable" an average of seven times a day, each episode lasting approximately 23 minutes. While nurses and technicians utilized a variety of interventions, many of these babies remained inconsolable. The nurses had read about the use of music therapy in regards to physiological measures with premature infants, but could not find research that explored the use of music therapy with inconsolability related to nothing by mouth status. Our Unit Council decided to explore the effects of music therapy on the crying behaviors of difficult-to-console infants. Staff nurses, under the mentorship of a member of our Nursing Research Council, created our research questions which were: 1) What is the effect of music therapy on the inconsolable behaviors of critically ill infants? 2) What is the effect of music therapy on the physiological measures of heart rate, resp., and blood pressure? With direction from our mentor we collaborated with a doctoral prepared nursing faculty member and a music professor at an affiliated college. Our team identified the type of music, made a specific preterm infant CD and set up data collection tools. We developed research packets for randomized selection, an informed consent form and a questionnaire for staff perception of the intervention. The results of our study were encouraging while we collected data and then exciting when statistical analysis showed that the intervention we created and administered reduced not only frequency of inconsolability but also duration. Frequency of inconsolable crying episodes decreased to an average of four per day, lasting only 5.5 minutes. Healthcare providers need to be aware that premature infants who may be NPO for a period of time may have episodes of inconsolability; providing music therapy is a method that nurses can use to make the transition from NPO to feeding less stressful and improve physiological and psychosocial status. REFERENCES: Appleton, S. (1997). Handle with care: An investigation of the handling received by preterm infants in intensive care. Journal of neonatal nursing, 3 (3), 23-27. Caine, J. (1991). The effects of music on the selected stress behaviors, weight, caloric and formula intake, and length of hospital stay of premature and low birth weight neonates in a newborn intensive care unit. Journal of Music Therapy, 28 (4), 180-192. Collins, SK & Kuck, K. (1991). Music therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal Network (9) 6, 23-26. Evans, J., Vogelpohl, D., Bourguignon, C. M., Morcott, C. S. (1997). Pain behaviors in LBW infants accompany some "nonpainful" caregiving procedures. Neonatal network, 16 (3), 33-40. Field, T., Ignatoff, E., Stringer, S., Brennan, J., Greenberg, R., Widmayer, S., & Anderson, G. C. (1982). Nonnutritive sucking during tube feedings: Effects on preterm neonates in an intensive care unit. Pediatrics, 70(3), 381-384.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Music Therapy as a Nursing Intervention for Inconsolabilityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWeaver, Barbara Smithen_US
dc.contributor.authorKeith, Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Kendraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Smith Weaver, CCRN, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Lizella, Georgia, USA, email: cweaver@pstel.net; Douglas Keith, PhD, MT-BC; Kendra Russell, PhD, RN, Georgia College and State Universityen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182617-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Healthcare providers need to be aware that a preterm specific music therapy intervention is a method that nurses can use to make the transition from nothing-by-mouth status to feeding less stressful and improve physiological and psychosocial status of premature infants. This intervention can reduce crying frequency and duration in preterm babies. ABSTRACT: Over the decades, neonatal nurses have developed strategies to manage crying episodes of the critically ill and convalescing infant. These episodes of crying are not only stressful and upsetting to the parents, but they are also stressful and time consuming for the nurses caring for these infants. In our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NNICU) in a 600 bed teaching hospital, infants who were NPO became "inconsolable" an average of seven times a day, each episode lasting approximately 23 minutes. While nurses and technicians utilized a variety of interventions, many of these babies remained inconsolable. The nurses had read about the use of music therapy in regards to physiological measures with premature infants, but could not find research that explored the use of music therapy with inconsolability related to nothing by mouth status. Our Unit Council decided to explore the effects of music therapy on the crying behaviors of difficult-to-console infants. Staff nurses, under the mentorship of a member of our Nursing Research Council, created our research questions which were: 1) What is the effect of music therapy on the inconsolable behaviors of critically ill infants? 2) What is the effect of music therapy on the physiological measures of heart rate, resp., and blood pressure? With direction from our mentor we collaborated with a doctoral prepared nursing faculty member and a music professor at an affiliated college. Our team identified the type of music, made a specific preterm infant CD and set up data collection tools. We developed research packets for randomized selection, an informed consent form and a questionnaire for staff perception of the intervention. The results of our study were encouraging while we collected data and then exciting when statistical analysis showed that the intervention we created and administered reduced not only frequency of inconsolability but also duration. Frequency of inconsolable crying episodes decreased to an average of four per day, lasting only 5.5 minutes. Healthcare providers need to be aware that premature infants who may be NPO for a period of time may have episodes of inconsolability; providing music therapy is a method that nurses can use to make the transition from NPO to feeding less stressful and improve physiological and psychosocial status. REFERENCES: Appleton, S. (1997). Handle with care: An investigation of the handling received by preterm infants in intensive care. Journal of neonatal nursing, 3 (3), 23-27. Caine, J. (1991). The effects of music on the selected stress behaviors, weight, caloric and formula intake, and length of hospital stay of premature and low birth weight neonates in a newborn intensive care unit. Journal of Music Therapy, 28 (4), 180-192. Collins, SK & Kuck, K. (1991). Music therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal Network (9) 6, 23-26. Evans, J., Vogelpohl, D., Bourguignon, C. M., Morcott, C. S. (1997). Pain behaviors in LBW infants accompany some "nonpainful" caregiving procedures. Neonatal network, 16 (3), 33-40. Field, T., Ignatoff, E., Stringer, S., Brennan, J., Greenberg, R., Widmayer, S., & Anderson, G. C. (1982). Nonnutritive sucking during tube feedings: Effects on preterm neonates in an intensive care unit. Pediatrics, 70(3), 381-384.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:32:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:32:18Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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