2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182619
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Innovative Connections: Partnering for Sustained Nursing Research Development
Author(s):
Wendler, M.
Author Details:
M. Wendler, RN, PhD, CCRN, Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, Illinois, USA, email: wendler.cecilia@mhsil.com
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: By developing innovative connections and creative solutions, a strong web of support increases staff nurse involvement. The processes and supports developed over five years will be fully described. ABSTRACT: Innovative Connections and Creative Solutions: Partnering for Sustained Nursing Research Development Successfully supporting and sustaining staff nurse involvement in research demands a multimodal approach. We created a strong web of support for staff nurses through innovative connections and creative solutions, resulting in disseminated involvement of staff nurses across this Magnet-designated organization. By orchestrating research consultation and financial resources, developing collegial and interdisciplinary relationships, creating a culture of inquiry, and implementing an innovative research education approach designed for staff nurses, we have positively influenced the image of professional nursing through widespread participation in research activities. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development of a sustained program of nursing research focused on the needs of nurses at all levels. By developing innovative relationships with academic partners, we produced outstanding results: At present, we have nearly 100 nurses across the organization involved in research initiatives. Further, we have over 40 open research protocols with participation, and had 20 referred publications and presentations last year. The processes and support structures developed over a five-year period in a sustained, broad-based approach of staff nurse-driven research in a shared governance institution will be described in detail. Implications for program and staff development for Magnet and Magnet-aspiring institutions will be provided. REFERENCES: Bakker, D., Trottier, T., & McChesney, C. (1997). Clinical oncology nurses' perception of research. Canadian Oncology Nursing Forum, 7(3), 150-4. Estabrooks, C., Floyd, J., Scott-Findlay, S., O'Leary, K., & Gushta, M. (2003). Individual determinants of research utilization: a systematic review. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 43(5), 506-520. Harrington, L. (2006). Implementing a hospital-based nursing research program in 30 days. Nurse Leader, February, 37-42, 55. Harrington, L., Hoffman, E., Allard, P., et al. Nursing research dashboard: A tool for managing your nursing research program. Nurse Leader, 4(5), 1-6. James, V. & Clark, M. (2007). Benchmarking research development in nursing: Curran's competitive advantage as a framework for excellence. Journal of Research in Nursing, 12, 269-287. LoBiondo-Wood, G. & Haber, J. (1998). Use of research in practice. IN: Nursing research methods, critical appraisal and utilization (4th. Ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby. Melnyk, B. & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2005). Using models and strategies for evidence based practice. IN: Evidence-based practice in nursing and health care (3rd.Ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. O'Halloran, V., Pollock, S., Gottleib, T., & Schwartz, F. (1996). Improving self-efficacy in nursing research. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 10(2), 83-87. Poster, E., Betz, C., & Randell, B. (1992). Psychiatric nurses' attitudes toward and involvement in nursing research. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing, 30(10), 26-29. Snyder-Halpem, R. (1994). An assessment taxonomy for designing nursing research programs. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 16(81), 81-91. Stone, P. (2005). Return on investment models. Applied Nursing Research, 18(3), 110-112. Tsai, S. (2003). The effects of a research utilization in-service program on nurses. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 40, 105-113. Wallin, L., Estabrooks, C., Midodzi, W., & Cummings, G. (2006). Development and validation of a derived measure of research utilization by nurses. Nursing Research, 55(3), 149-160. Wells, N. & Baggs, J. (1994). A survey of practicing nurses' research interests and activities. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 8(3), 145-151.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInnovative Connections: Partnering for Sustained Nursing Research Developmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorWendler, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Wendler, RN, PhD, CCRN, Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, Illinois, USA, email: wendler.cecilia@mhsil.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182619-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: By developing innovative connections and creative solutions, a strong web of support increases staff nurse involvement. The processes and supports developed over five years will be fully described. ABSTRACT: Innovative Connections and Creative Solutions: Partnering for Sustained Nursing Research Development Successfully supporting and sustaining staff nurse involvement in research demands a multimodal approach. We created a strong web of support for staff nurses through innovative connections and creative solutions, resulting in disseminated involvement of staff nurses across this Magnet-designated organization. By orchestrating research consultation and financial resources, developing collegial and interdisciplinary relationships, creating a culture of inquiry, and implementing an innovative research education approach designed for staff nurses, we have positively influenced the image of professional nursing through widespread participation in research activities. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the development of a sustained program of nursing research focused on the needs of nurses at all levels. By developing innovative relationships with academic partners, we produced outstanding results: At present, we have nearly 100 nurses across the organization involved in research initiatives. Further, we have over 40 open research protocols with participation, and had 20 referred publications and presentations last year. The processes and support structures developed over a five-year period in a sustained, broad-based approach of staff nurse-driven research in a shared governance institution will be described in detail. Implications for program and staff development for Magnet and Magnet-aspiring institutions will be provided. REFERENCES: Bakker, D., Trottier, T., & McChesney, C. (1997). Clinical oncology nurses' perception of research. Canadian Oncology Nursing Forum, 7(3), 150-4. Estabrooks, C., Floyd, J., Scott-Findlay, S., O'Leary, K., & Gushta, M. (2003). Individual determinants of research utilization: a systematic review. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 43(5), 506-520. Harrington, L. (2006). Implementing a hospital-based nursing research program in 30 days. Nurse Leader, February, 37-42, 55. Harrington, L., Hoffman, E., Allard, P., et al. Nursing research dashboard: A tool for managing your nursing research program. Nurse Leader, 4(5), 1-6. James, V. & Clark, M. (2007). Benchmarking research development in nursing: Curran's competitive advantage as a framework for excellence. Journal of Research in Nursing, 12, 269-287. LoBiondo-Wood, G. & Haber, J. (1998). Use of research in practice. IN: Nursing research methods, critical appraisal and utilization (4th. Ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby. Melnyk, B. & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2005). Using models and strategies for evidence based practice. IN: Evidence-based practice in nursing and health care (3rd.Ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. O'Halloran, V., Pollock, S., Gottleib, T., & Schwartz, F. (1996). Improving self-efficacy in nursing research. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 10(2), 83-87. Poster, E., Betz, C., & Randell, B. (1992). Psychiatric nurses' attitudes toward and involvement in nursing research. Journal of Psychosocial Nursing, 30(10), 26-29. Snyder-Halpem, R. (1994). An assessment taxonomy for designing nursing research programs. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 16(81), 81-91. Stone, P. (2005). Return on investment models. Applied Nursing Research, 18(3), 110-112. Tsai, S. (2003). The effects of a research utilization in-service program on nurses. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 40, 105-113. Wallin, L., Estabrooks, C., Midodzi, W., & Cummings, G. (2006). Development and validation of a derived measure of research utilization by nurses. Nursing Research, 55(3), 149-160. Wells, N. & Baggs, J. (1994). A survey of practicing nurses' research interests and activities. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 8(3), 145-151.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:32:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:32:24Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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