2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182621
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Applying System Learning From Individual Hospital RN Satisfaction Reports
Author(s):
Orton, Janette; Collette, Katreena; Woods-Kershner, Nancy
Author Details:
Janette Orton, MS, RN, CPHQ, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, email: jan.orton@intermountainhealthcare.org; Katreena Collette, BSN, RN, Utah Valley Regional Medical Center; Nancy Woods-Kershner, MS, RN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Our hospital system began the NDNQI nursing satisfaction survey. Individual hospitals desired to benchmark against each other and also compare to the system results. As no system reports are available from NDNQI for the RN Satisfaction survey, a system data manager used the 11 individual hospital reports to compile a system score for each component in Table 1, 2, & 3 of the survey. In addition, a system score was developed for each unit type. The system score and hospital scores were then compared to the NDNQI results. Color shading was used to identify system and hospital performance that were "below the lowest confidence intervals" or "in the top quartile" as determined by national performance. Three areas of performance improvement were identified throughout the system. (Pay, Satisfaction with CNO and Career development opportunities). Action plans at a system level were developed to improve these specific RN satisfaction results. A standard power pint presentation was developed to share this information at all levels of the healthcare system. The next survey demonstrated one of the three areas reported had improved to above the lower control limit (Career development opportunities), one (Pay) remained the same but had not been expected to improve because of a change in the annual pay cycle, and one remained below (Satisfied with CNO) the lower confidence interval. System learning and improvement can occur though a consistent methodology using the RN Satisfaction survey. Sharing the data across a system allows hospitals facilitated open conversation and sharing of best practice to improve RN practice environment.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplying System Learning From Individual Hospital RN Satisfaction Reportsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOrton, Janetteen_US
dc.contributor.authorCollette, Katreenaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoods-Kershner, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsJanette Orton, MS, RN, CPHQ, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, email: jan.orton@intermountainhealthcare.org; Katreena Collette, BSN, RN, Utah Valley Regional Medical Center; Nancy Woods-Kershner, MS, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182621-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Our hospital system began the NDNQI nursing satisfaction survey. Individual hospitals desired to benchmark against each other and also compare to the system results. As no system reports are available from NDNQI for the RN Satisfaction survey, a system data manager used the 11 individual hospital reports to compile a system score for each component in Table 1, 2, & 3 of the survey. In addition, a system score was developed for each unit type. The system score and hospital scores were then compared to the NDNQI results. Color shading was used to identify system and hospital performance that were "below the lowest confidence intervals" or "in the top quartile" as determined by national performance. Three areas of performance improvement were identified throughout the system. (Pay, Satisfaction with CNO and Career development opportunities). Action plans at a system level were developed to improve these specific RN satisfaction results. A standard power pint presentation was developed to share this information at all levels of the healthcare system. The next survey demonstrated one of the three areas reported had improved to above the lower control limit (Career development opportunities), one (Pay) remained the same but had not been expected to improve because of a change in the annual pay cycle, and one remained below (Satisfied with CNO) the lower confidence interval. System learning and improvement can occur though a consistent methodology using the RN Satisfaction survey. Sharing the data across a system allows hospitals facilitated open conversation and sharing of best practice to improve RN practice environment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:32:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:32:30Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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