Apprehension Levels of Chinese and American Nurses in Caring for the Dying Patient. An International Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182624
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Apprehension Levels of Chinese and American Nurses in Caring for the Dying Patient. An International Study
Author(s):
Parker, Gary; Reyna, Krista; Fanning, Linda; Weigel, Christine
Author Details:
Gary Parker, PhD MS BSN, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: Gparker@ok.mercy.net; Krista Reyna, MS, BSN, APRN; Linda Fanning, MS, BSN; Christine Weigel, MBA BSN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate what similarities and differences there were in apprehension levels in Nurses from China and The United States in regards to caring for the dying patient. Other areas explored are culture and the training background of theses Nurses. Method: 183 nurses representing an acute care Hospital in Hangzhou, China and 151Nurses representing an acute care hospital in Oklahoma were administered the Professional End-of-Life care Attitude Scale (PEAS). The PEAS allows us to identify the level of apprehension nurses have in caring for dying patients. The PEAS will also allow us to measure differences by degree, gender, training and years of experience. Results: A series of one-way ANOVAs and Z -tests showed that there are similarities across cultures in perceived apprehension in interacting with dying patients (China = 86.4, SD = 8.05 vs. USA = 91.95, SD = 6.25). Generally, this speaks to the universality of the apprehension health care professionals feel about interacting with terminally ill persons and their families, irrespective of the cultural context in which such interactions occur. Conclusion: This is the first time a study has been conducted comparing nurse?s attitudes in China and the United States concerning the care of the dying patient. These results will help nurses not only in China and the United States, but all nurses who care for dying patients. This data shows there should be more direct contact for nurses in regards to end of life care no matter their country of origin.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApprehension Levels of Chinese and American Nurses in Caring for the Dying Patient. An International Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorParker, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.authorReyna, Kristaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFanning, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWeigel, Christineen_US
dc.author.detailsGary Parker, PhD MS BSN, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: Gparker@ok.mercy.net; Krista Reyna, MS, BSN, APRN; Linda Fanning, MS, BSN; Christine Weigel, MBA BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182624-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate what similarities and differences there were in apprehension levels in Nurses from China and The United States in regards to caring for the dying patient. Other areas explored are culture and the training background of theses Nurses. Method: 183 nurses representing an acute care Hospital in Hangzhou, China and 151Nurses representing an acute care hospital in Oklahoma were administered the Professional End-of-Life care Attitude Scale (PEAS). The PEAS allows us to identify the level of apprehension nurses have in caring for dying patients. The PEAS will also allow us to measure differences by degree, gender, training and years of experience. Results: A series of one-way ANOVAs and Z -tests showed that there are similarities across cultures in perceived apprehension in interacting with dying patients (China = 86.4, SD = 8.05 vs. USA = 91.95, SD = 6.25). Generally, this speaks to the universality of the apprehension health care professionals feel about interacting with terminally ill persons and their families, irrespective of the cultural context in which such interactions occur. Conclusion: This is the first time a study has been conducted comparing nurse?s attitudes in China and the United States concerning the care of the dying patient. These results will help nurses not only in China and the United States, but all nurses who care for dying patients. This data shows there should be more direct contact for nurses in regards to end of life care no matter their country of origin.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:32:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:32:38Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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