2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182626
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Incentive Spirometry to Minimize Respiratory Complications in Surgical Patients
Author(s):
Pellegatta, Anna
Author Details:
Anna Pellegatta, RN, Rex Healthcare, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA, email: anna.pellegatta@rexhealth.com
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Purpose: To compare two different methods of education and reinforcement in the use of incentive spirometry (IS) to prevent respiratory complications in postoperative patients. Background: A lengthy literature review presented differing opinions as to the effectiveness of Incentive Spirometry in the prevention of respiratory complications post abdominal surgery. At REX Healthcare, Incentive Spirometry is frequently ordered post operatively, but the effectiveness and compliance has been questionable. Research Questions: 1. Will there be a difference in the number of respiratory complications in patients treated with the standard IS education compared to an structured education and intensive reinforcement program? 2. Will there be a difference in the maximum IS volume generated in patients treated with the standard IS education compared to an structured education and intensive reinforcement program? Study Design/Study Procedure: A pretest-postest quasi-experimental design will be used to compare 2 different education and reinforcement methods for preventing respiratory complications following abdominal surgery: 1) RN initiated education and follow-up (one month); and 2) RN initiated and follow-up with an intensive education and scheduled reinforcement program (one month) (Figure 2). The dependent variables will be the presence on POD #1, 2, and 3 of fever, productive cough, oxygen saturation, maximum IS volume, and/or radiological findings of atelectasis or infiltrate. Data will be collected prospectively in each group. Sample Selection: Sample Subjects = 68 total Elective abdominal surgical procedure Height between 58" and 74" for females and between 58" and 78" for males Age >21 and <80 years Order for IS within 2-4 hours of surgery Admission directly to 7West from PACU Excluding patients with cognitive impairment and with known infection at time of surgery. Current Status: We are currently nearing completion of our data collection. [Please contact presenter for more information.] 1. O'Donohue, W.J. Jr. (1992). Postoperative pulmonary complications: When are preventive and therapeutic measures necessary? Postgraduate Medicine, 91, 167-170, 173-175. 2. O'Donohue, W.J. Jr. (1985). National survey of the useage of lung expansion modalities for the prevention and treatment of postoperative atelectasis following abdominal and thoracic surgery. Chest, 87, 76-80. 3. Wattie, J. (1998). Incentive spirometry following coronary artery bypass surgery. Physiotherapy, 84, 508-514. 4. Bartlett, R.H. Gazzaniga, A.B. & Geraghty, T.R. (1973). Studies on the pathogenesis and prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications. Journal of the American Medical Society, 224, 1017-1021. 5. Paul, W.L. & Downs, J.B. (1981). Postoperative atelectasis: intermittent positive pressure breathing, incentive spirometry, and face mask positive end-expiratory pressure. Archives of Surgery, 116, 861-863. 6. Stock, MC., Downs, J.B., & Cooper, R.B. (1984). Comparison of continuous positive airway pressure, incentive spirometry and conservative therapy after cardiac operations. Critical Care Medicine, 12, 969-972. 7. Celli, B.R., Rodriguez, K.S., & Snider, G.L. (1984). A controlled trial of intermittent positive pressure breathing, incentive spirometry, and deep breathing exercises in preventing pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. American Review of Respiratory Disease, 130, 12-15. 8. Schwieger, I., Gamulin, Z., & Forester, A. (1986). Absence of benefit of incentive spirometry in low-risk patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy: a controlled randomized study. Chest, 89, 652-656. 9. Gosselink, R., Schrever, K., Cops, P., Witvrouwen, H., De Leyn, P., Troosters, T., Lerut, A., Deneffe, G., & Decramer, M. (2000). Incentive spirometry does not enhance recover after thoracic surgery. Critical Care Medicine, 28(3), 679-683. 10. Thomas, J.A. & McIntosh, J.M. (1994). [Please contact presenter for more information.]
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Incentive Spirometry to Minimize Respiratory Complications in Surgical Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPellegatta, Annaen_US
dc.author.detailsAnna Pellegatta, RN, Rex Healthcare, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA, email: anna.pellegatta@rexhealth.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182626-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Purpose: To compare two different methods of education and reinforcement in the use of incentive spirometry (IS) to prevent respiratory complications in postoperative patients. Background: A lengthy literature review presented differing opinions as to the effectiveness of Incentive Spirometry in the prevention of respiratory complications post abdominal surgery. At REX Healthcare, Incentive Spirometry is frequently ordered post operatively, but the effectiveness and compliance has been questionable. Research Questions: 1. Will there be a difference in the number of respiratory complications in patients treated with the standard IS education compared to an structured education and intensive reinforcement program? 2. Will there be a difference in the maximum IS volume generated in patients treated with the standard IS education compared to an structured education and intensive reinforcement program? Study Design/Study Procedure: A pretest-postest quasi-experimental design will be used to compare 2 different education and reinforcement methods for preventing respiratory complications following abdominal surgery: 1) RN initiated education and follow-up (one month); and 2) RN initiated and follow-up with an intensive education and scheduled reinforcement program (one month) (Figure 2). The dependent variables will be the presence on POD #1, 2, and 3 of fever, productive cough, oxygen saturation, maximum IS volume, and/or radiological findings of atelectasis or infiltrate. Data will be collected prospectively in each group. Sample Selection: Sample Subjects = 68 total Elective abdominal surgical procedure Height between 58" and 74" for females and between 58" and 78" for males Age &gt;21 and &lt;80 years Order for IS within 2-4 hours of surgery Admission directly to 7West from PACU Excluding patients with cognitive impairment and with known infection at time of surgery. Current Status: We are currently nearing completion of our data collection. [Please contact presenter for more information.] 1. O'Donohue, W.J. Jr. (1992). Postoperative pulmonary complications: When are preventive and therapeutic measures necessary? Postgraduate Medicine, 91, 167-170, 173-175. 2. O'Donohue, W.J. Jr. (1985). National survey of the useage of lung expansion modalities for the prevention and treatment of postoperative atelectasis following abdominal and thoracic surgery. Chest, 87, 76-80. 3. Wattie, J. (1998). Incentive spirometry following coronary artery bypass surgery. Physiotherapy, 84, 508-514. 4. Bartlett, R.H. Gazzaniga, A.B. & Geraghty, T.R. (1973). Studies on the pathogenesis and prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications. Journal of the American Medical Society, 224, 1017-1021. 5. Paul, W.L. & Downs, J.B. (1981). Postoperative atelectasis: intermittent positive pressure breathing, incentive spirometry, and face mask positive end-expiratory pressure. Archives of Surgery, 116, 861-863. 6. Stock, MC., Downs, J.B., & Cooper, R.B. (1984). Comparison of continuous positive airway pressure, incentive spirometry and conservative therapy after cardiac operations. Critical Care Medicine, 12, 969-972. 7. Celli, B.R., Rodriguez, K.S., & Snider, G.L. (1984). A controlled trial of intermittent positive pressure breathing, incentive spirometry, and deep breathing exercises in preventing pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. American Review of Respiratory Disease, 130, 12-15. 8. Schwieger, I., Gamulin, Z., & Forester, A. (1986). Absence of benefit of incentive spirometry in low-risk patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy: a controlled randomized study. Chest, 89, 652-656. 9. Gosselink, R., Schrever, K., Cops, P., Witvrouwen, H., De Leyn, P., Troosters, T., Lerut, A., Deneffe, G., & Decramer, M. (2000). Incentive spirometry does not enhance recover after thoracic surgery. Critical Care Medicine, 28(3), 679-683. 10. Thomas, J.A. & McIntosh, J.M. (1994). [Please contact presenter for more information.]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:32:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:32:43Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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