2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182632
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empowering the Staff Nurse in Medication Safety in a Community Volunteer Clinic
Author(s):
Rettig, Delores; Sitterding, Mary
Author Details:
Delores Rettig, BSN, RN, Staff Nurse, Columbus Regional Hospital, Columbus, Indiana, USA, email: msitterdin@crh.org; Mary Sitterding, MSN, CNS, CNRN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Magnet organizations demonstrate a compelling community presence highlighted by Force 10: Community and Healthcare Organization. During a community health survey, one Magnet Organization noted 40% of residents were at level 1 or 2 regarding adult literacy based upon adult literacy definitions. A volunteer registered nurse serving the Volunteers in Medicine Clinic noted patients were unable to name their medications and frequently did not seem to understand the purpose of medications or adjustments that might have been made to dosing during previous visits. Clinical nurse specialists embraced the opportunity to support the staff nurse burning desire to complete a clinical inquiryexamining factors influencing medication safety among the disadvantaged population served. Two instruments were used. Survey A addressed attitudes, beliefs, and adherence to the prescribed medication regime. Survey B addressed patient health literacy regarding disease and medication knowledge. Each of the Cronbach's Alpha scores were <0.80 A convenient sampling method was used to invite patients to participate in the survey. Twenty-two percent reported self-imposed dose reduction based upon the financial burden. Thirteen percent of patients reported taking extra pills or increasing their dose. Among 198 participants, only 17% of patients could name their medications. Additionally, 63% of patients reported not using a pill box while 68% of patients reported not carrying a list of current medications. Eighty-one percent of patients report not carrying a list of their allergies. There are multiple implications for future inquiry and practice in alignment with Force 10 that will be highlighted in this presentation. References: 1. Ad Hoc Committee on Health Literacy for the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association, 1999. Health Literacy: Report of the Council on Scientific Affairs. JAMA; Volume 281, Number 6. 2. Doak, C., Doak, L., & Root, J. (1996). Teaching Patients with Low Literacy Skills. J.B. Lippincott. Philadephia, Pennsylvania. 3. Houts, P., Witmer, J., Egeth, H., Loscalzo, M. Zabora, J. (2001). Using pictographs to enhance recall of spoken medical instruction II. Patient Education and Counseling. 4. Davis, T., Long, S., Jackson, R., Mayeaux.E., George, R., Murphy, P., Crouch, M. (1993). Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine: A Shortened Screening Instrument. Family Medicine. 5. Kiefer, K. (2001) Health Literacy: Responding to the Need for Help. Center for Medicare Education. 6. Lorig, K. (1996). Patient Education: A Practical Approach. Sage Publications, Inc. Thousand Oaks, California. 7. Maibach, E. & Parrott, R. (1995). Designing Health Messages: Approaches from Communication Theory and Public Health Practice. Sage Publications, Inc. Thousand Oaks, California. 8. American Academy of Nurses Credentialing Center (2005). ANCC Magnet Recognition Application Manual.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpowering the Staff Nurse in Medication Safety in a Community Volunteer Clinicen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRettig, Deloresen_US
dc.contributor.authorSitterding, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsDelores Rettig, BSN, RN, Staff Nurse, Columbus Regional Hospital, Columbus, Indiana, USA, email: msitterdin@crh.org; Mary Sitterding, MSN, CNS, CNRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182632-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Magnet organizations demonstrate a compelling community presence highlighted by Force 10: Community and Healthcare Organization. During a community health survey, one Magnet Organization noted 40% of residents were at level 1 or 2 regarding adult literacy based upon adult literacy definitions. A volunteer registered nurse serving the Volunteers in Medicine Clinic noted patients were unable to name their medications and frequently did not seem to understand the purpose of medications or adjustments that might have been made to dosing during previous visits. Clinical nurse specialists embraced the opportunity to support the staff nurse burning desire to complete a clinical inquiryexamining factors influencing medication safety among the disadvantaged population served. Two instruments were used. Survey A addressed attitudes, beliefs, and adherence to the prescribed medication regime. Survey B addressed patient health literacy regarding disease and medication knowledge. Each of the Cronbach's Alpha scores were &lt;0.80 A convenient sampling method was used to invite patients to participate in the survey. Twenty-two percent reported self-imposed dose reduction based upon the financial burden. Thirteen percent of patients reported taking extra pills or increasing their dose. Among 198 participants, only 17% of patients could name their medications. Additionally, 63% of patients reported not using a pill box while 68% of patients reported not carrying a list of current medications. Eighty-one percent of patients report not carrying a list of their allergies. There are multiple implications for future inquiry and practice in alignment with Force 10 that will be highlighted in this presentation. References: 1. Ad Hoc Committee on Health Literacy for the Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association, 1999. Health Literacy: Report of the Council on Scientific Affairs. JAMA; Volume 281, Number 6. 2. Doak, C., Doak, L., & Root, J. (1996). Teaching Patients with Low Literacy Skills. J.B. Lippincott. Philadephia, Pennsylvania. 3. Houts, P., Witmer, J., Egeth, H., Loscalzo, M. Zabora, J. (2001). Using pictographs to enhance recall of spoken medical instruction II. Patient Education and Counseling. 4. Davis, T., Long, S., Jackson, R., Mayeaux.E., George, R., Murphy, P., Crouch, M. (1993). Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine: A Shortened Screening Instrument. Family Medicine. 5. Kiefer, K. (2001) Health Literacy: Responding to the Need for Help. Center for Medicare Education. 6. Lorig, K. (1996). Patient Education: A Practical Approach. Sage Publications, Inc. Thousand Oaks, California. 7. Maibach, E. & Parrott, R. (1995). Designing Health Messages: Approaches from Communication Theory and Public Health Practice. Sage Publications, Inc. Thousand Oaks, California. 8. American Academy of Nurses Credentialing Center (2005). ANCC Magnet Recognition Application Manual.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:33:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:33:00Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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