Ensuring a Healthy Work Environment (HWE) by Improving Communication Patterns in a Surgical Trauma Burn ICU (STBICU)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182640
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ensuring a Healthy Work Environment (HWE) by Improving Communication Patterns in a Surgical Trauma Burn ICU (STBICU)
Author(s):
Shaffer, Debra; Clark, Kimberly
Author Details:
Debra Shaffer, RN MSN MBA FNP-C, University of Vriginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: ds4m@virginia.edu; Kimberly Clark, RN BSN CCRN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Forces of Magnetism, Force 1, addresses the quality of nursing leadership. Quality of patient care improved in a Level I Trauma/Burn ICU when nursing leadership focused on resetting communication norms and building strong communication skills in bedside nursing staff. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses? identifies six standards which establish and maintain a healthy work environment. The first standard is skilled communication. Nurses must be as skilled in communication as in clinical interventions. Communication is essential to a collaborative, collegial, comfortable work setting. Unit leadership evaluated the unit's communication patterns. Improvement was needed. Initiatives were designed focusing on creating a culture of open, honest communication. Over an 18 month period staff members of the STBICU were surveyed pre and post communication interventions. Interventions included leadership role modeling, teaching "communication in the moment", discussion at meetings and implementation of walking rounds. A valid and reliable survey tool authored by Stephen Shortell was adapted to evaluate staff perception of the quality of unit communication and collaboration. Improvement was noted in four out of five survey categories. This study demonstrated improvement in and satisfaction with communication patterns and skills following targeted communication interventions. A decline in satisfaction in "management of disagreements between staff" may be a result of increased awareness of behaviors required for effective communication. Communication patterns in a critical care environment can be changed with a focused initiative. The formation of a creative partnership between leadership and bedside staff promoted a healthy work environment and improved the quality of patient care. Reference: American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, (2005). AACN Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments: A Journey to Excellence. Retrieved January 7, 2007, from http://www.aacn.org/AACN/hwe.nsf/vwdoc/HWEHomePage Patterson K, Grenny J, McMillian R, Switzler A. Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When the Stakes Are High. Hightstown, N.J., McGraw-Hill, 2002. VitalSmarts, L. C., (2005). Silence Kills: The Seven Crucial Conversations in Healthcare. Retrieved January 7, 2007 from http://www.silencekills.com/Download.aspx
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnsuring a Healthy Work Environment (HWE) by Improving Communication Patterns in a Surgical Trauma Burn ICU (STBICU)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorShaffer, Debraen_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Kimberlyen_US
dc.author.detailsDebra Shaffer, RN MSN MBA FNP-C, University of Vriginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: ds4m@virginia.edu; Kimberly Clark, RN BSN CCRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182640-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Forces of Magnetism, Force 1, addresses the quality of nursing leadership. Quality of patient care improved in a Level I Trauma/Burn ICU when nursing leadership focused on resetting communication norms and building strong communication skills in bedside nursing staff. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses? identifies six standards which establish and maintain a healthy work environment. The first standard is skilled communication. Nurses must be as skilled in communication as in clinical interventions. Communication is essential to a collaborative, collegial, comfortable work setting. Unit leadership evaluated the unit's communication patterns. Improvement was needed. Initiatives were designed focusing on creating a culture of open, honest communication. Over an 18 month period staff members of the STBICU were surveyed pre and post communication interventions. Interventions included leadership role modeling, teaching "communication in the moment", discussion at meetings and implementation of walking rounds. A valid and reliable survey tool authored by Stephen Shortell was adapted to evaluate staff perception of the quality of unit communication and collaboration. Improvement was noted in four out of five survey categories. This study demonstrated improvement in and satisfaction with communication patterns and skills following targeted communication interventions. A decline in satisfaction in "management of disagreements between staff" may be a result of increased awareness of behaviors required for effective communication. Communication patterns in a critical care environment can be changed with a focused initiative. The formation of a creative partnership between leadership and bedside staff promoted a healthy work environment and improved the quality of patient care. Reference: American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, (2005). AACN Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments: A Journey to Excellence. Retrieved January 7, 2007, from http://www.aacn.org/AACN/hwe.nsf/vwdoc/HWEHomePage Patterson K, Grenny J, McMillian R, Switzler A. Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When the Stakes Are High. Hightstown, N.J., McGraw-Hill, 2002. VitalSmarts, L. C., (2005). Silence Kills: The Seven Crucial Conversations in Healthcare. Retrieved January 7, 2007 from http://www.silencekills.com/Download.aspxen_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:33:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:33:22Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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