2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182645
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What It's Like To Be Restrained - The Patient Speaks, Nurses Listen
Author(s):
Spencer, Ellen
Author Details:
Ellen Spencer, MS, CNS, RN, The Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York, USA, email: ellen.spencer@bassett.org
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: The drive to reduce the use of restraints in healthcare is widely acknowledged. The discussion is embedded in the issues of civil liberties, physical and emotional health, independence, and safety. Colleagues in long-term care have succeeded in creative ways to promote safety without restraints. While allowable, for now - the use of restraints and seclusion in acute psychiatric units is intensely scrutinized. This psychiatric unit employed an unusual but effective strategy to reduce restraints. This, in addition to other interventions, reduced the use of restraints to zero and seclusion by 71%. During 2005, there were 30 episodes of restraint and 16 episodes of seclusion in 5666 patient days (rate of .53% and .28% respectively). During that year, patients who had been restrained or secluded spoke with staff about their experiences at a formal in-service program after the event. Implementing this and aligning the staff who were initially anxious and reluctant due to other legitimate reasons was challenging. A moving narrative from a patient who vocalized sadness and loneliness during the seclusion experience had a significant impact on the staff's perception. Ultimately, both patients and staff have positively received this intervention. In the year following the intervention described above, there were no episodes of restraint and 5 episodes of seclusion (rate of .08%) with 5974 patient days. The decrease in numbers of restraint and seclusion from 2005 to 2006 is a measurement of our success in reducing and working toward eliminating the use of these interventions. Reference: Creating Violence Free & Coercion Free Mental Health Hospitals, Monograph and Manual, January 2006, New York State Office of Mental Health
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat It's Like To Be Restrained - The Patient Speaks, Nurses Listenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Ellenen_US
dc.author.detailsEllen Spencer, MS, CNS, RN, The Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York, USA, email: ellen.spencer@bassett.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182645-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: The drive to reduce the use of restraints in healthcare is widely acknowledged. The discussion is embedded in the issues of civil liberties, physical and emotional health, independence, and safety. Colleagues in long-term care have succeeded in creative ways to promote safety without restraints. While allowable, for now - the use of restraints and seclusion in acute psychiatric units is intensely scrutinized. This psychiatric unit employed an unusual but effective strategy to reduce restraints. This, in addition to other interventions, reduced the use of restraints to zero and seclusion by 71%. During 2005, there were 30 episodes of restraint and 16 episodes of seclusion in 5666 patient days (rate of .53% and .28% respectively). During that year, patients who had been restrained or secluded spoke with staff about their experiences at a formal in-service program after the event. Implementing this and aligning the staff who were initially anxious and reluctant due to other legitimate reasons was challenging. A moving narrative from a patient who vocalized sadness and loneliness during the seclusion experience had a significant impact on the staff's perception. Ultimately, both patients and staff have positively received this intervention. In the year following the intervention described above, there were no episodes of restraint and 5 episodes of seclusion (rate of .08%) with 5974 patient days. The decrease in numbers of restraint and seclusion from 2005 to 2006 is a measurement of our success in reducing and working toward eliminating the use of these interventions. Reference: Creating Violence Free & Coercion Free Mental Health Hospitals, Monograph and Manual, January 2006, New York State Office of Mental Healthen_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:33:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:33:35Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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