2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182647
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decreasing Blood Culture Contamination: Chlorhexidine vs. Povidone-iodine
Author(s):
Stonecypher, Karen; Wilson, Pamela
Author Details:
Karen Stonecypher, MSN, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: karen.stonecypher@med.va.gov; Pamela Wilson, PhD, RN, FNP, BC, Prairie View A&M University
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Blood culture contamination represents an unending problem in healthcare. Inappropriate and delayed treatments add to the raising cost of health care. Hospital, laboratory, and pharmacy costs added to extended length of stay (LOS) total in the hundreds of thousands of dollars annually. The primary culprit is thought to be poor skin preparation prior to obtaining the blood culture Research Question: Does changing the skin preparation methodology from Povidone-iodine to Chlorhexidine 2% prior to drawing blood cultures reduce the number of contaminated blood cultures collected in the ER? Methodology: Design A descriptive, non-experimental prospective design examined blood cultures collected over four consecutive months in the emergency room (ER) during 2006. Setting The MEDVAMC is large tertiary care facility that averages about 1000 monthly ER visits in the 4th larges city in United States. Sample All veterans admitted to the ER requiring a blood culture as part of their standard care. Procedure In Months 1 and 4, skin preparation solution used was chlorhexidine. For two consecutive months (Months 2 and 3), povidone-iodine was used as the skin in skin preparation Data Analysis: A daily computerize medical record (CPRS) program query was used to collect all patients admission entry point, number of blood cultures drawn, and blood culture contaminations. A contamination rate was calculated for all blood cultures drawn during the study months. Results: Of the 1,302 blood cultures, the povidone-iodine contamination rate was 6.05%, chlorhexidine (Months 1 and 4) was 3.35%. Cost savings for the MEDVAMC for two months totaled $59,388. [Please contact presenter for more information.] References: Barenfager, J., Drake, C., Lawhorn, J., & Verhulst, S. (2004). Comparison of Chlorhexidine and Tincture of Iodine for Skin Asepsis in Preparation for Blood Sample Collection. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 42(5), 2216-2217. Calfee, D. P., & Farr, B. M. (2002). Comparison of Four Antiseptic Preparations for Skin in the Prevention of Contamination of Percutaneously Drawn Blood Cultures: a Randomized Trial. Clinical Journal of Microbiology, 40(5), 1660-1665. Reller, L. B., & Sexton, D. J. (2004). Technique of obtaining blood cultures for the detection of bacteremia. UpToDate, 13.1, Retrieved April 23, 2005, from http://www.uptodate.com Trautner, B. W., Clarridge, J. E., & Darouiche, R. O. (2002). Skin Antisepsis Kits Containing Alcohol and Chlorhexidine Gluconate or Tincture of Iodine are Associated with Low Rates of Blood Culture Contamination. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 23(7), 397-401. Weinstein, M. P. (2003). Blood Culture Contamination: Persisting Problems and Partial Progress. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 41(6), 22752278. Wilson, M. L., Weinstein, M. L., Mirrett, S., Reimer, L. G., Fernando, C., Meredith, F. T., et al. (2000). Comparison of Iodophor and Alcohol Pledgets with the Medi-Flex Blood Culture Prep Kit II for Preventing Contamination of Blood Cultures. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 38(12), 4665-4667.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecreasing Blood Culture Contamination: Chlorhexidine vs. Povidone-iodineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStonecypher, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Stonecypher, MSN, Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: karen.stonecypher@med.va.gov; Pamela Wilson, PhD, RN, FNP, BC, Prairie View A&M Universityen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182647-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Blood culture contamination represents an unending problem in healthcare. Inappropriate and delayed treatments add to the raising cost of health care. Hospital, laboratory, and pharmacy costs added to extended length of stay (LOS) total in the hundreds of thousands of dollars annually. The primary culprit is thought to be poor skin preparation prior to obtaining the blood culture Research Question: Does changing the skin preparation methodology from Povidone-iodine to Chlorhexidine 2% prior to drawing blood cultures reduce the number of contaminated blood cultures collected in the ER? Methodology: Design A descriptive, non-experimental prospective design examined blood cultures collected over four consecutive months in the emergency room (ER) during 2006. Setting The MEDVAMC is large tertiary care facility that averages about 1000 monthly ER visits in the 4th larges city in United States. Sample All veterans admitted to the ER requiring a blood culture as part of their standard care. Procedure In Months 1 and 4, skin preparation solution used was chlorhexidine. For two consecutive months (Months 2 and 3), povidone-iodine was used as the skin in skin preparation Data Analysis: A daily computerize medical record (CPRS) program query was used to collect all patients admission entry point, number of blood cultures drawn, and blood culture contaminations. A contamination rate was calculated for all blood cultures drawn during the study months. Results: Of the 1,302 blood cultures, the povidone-iodine contamination rate was 6.05%, chlorhexidine (Months 1 and 4) was 3.35%. Cost savings for the MEDVAMC for two months totaled $59,388. [Please contact presenter for more information.] References: Barenfager, J., Drake, C., Lawhorn, J., & Verhulst, S. (2004). Comparison of Chlorhexidine and Tincture of Iodine for Skin Asepsis in Preparation for Blood Sample Collection. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 42(5), 2216-2217. Calfee, D. P., & Farr, B. M. (2002). Comparison of Four Antiseptic Preparations for Skin in the Prevention of Contamination of Percutaneously Drawn Blood Cultures: a Randomized Trial. Clinical Journal of Microbiology, 40(5), 1660-1665. Reller, L. B., & Sexton, D. J. (2004). Technique of obtaining blood cultures for the detection of bacteremia. UpToDate, 13.1, Retrieved April 23, 2005, from http://www.uptodate.com Trautner, B. W., Clarridge, J. E., & Darouiche, R. O. (2002). Skin Antisepsis Kits Containing Alcohol and Chlorhexidine Gluconate or Tincture of Iodine are Associated with Low Rates of Blood Culture Contamination. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 23(7), 397-401. Weinstein, M. P. (2003). Blood Culture Contamination: Persisting Problems and Partial Progress. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 41(6), 22752278. Wilson, M. L., Weinstein, M. L., Mirrett, S., Reimer, L. G., Fernando, C., Meredith, F. T., et al. (2000). Comparison of Iodophor and Alcohol Pledgets with the Medi-Flex Blood Culture Prep Kit II for Preventing Contamination of Blood Cultures. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 38(12), 4665-4667.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:33:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:33:41Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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