2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182667
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ISBAR, Do You? Connecting Caregivers, Empowering Nurses and Celebrating Successful Communications
Author(s):
Zafian, Ruthann; Jansky, Lynn
Author Details:
Ruthann Zafian, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, USA, email: rzafian@harthosp.org; Lynn Jansky, RN, MSN
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: Thousands of lives and billions of dollars are lost each year to healthcare communication errors. At one Illinois hospital, analyses of sentinel events demonstrated at least 65% of the events included problems with communications. Improving communication is imperative for these reasons as well as to comply with the 2006 JCAHO Safety goal (2E) of healthcare facilities implementing a standardized approach to hand-off communications, including the opportunity to ask and respond to questions. At a large (800 Bed) metropolitan New England Magnet hospital, a sub-group of the House-wide Healthcare Team called the "Hand-offs Task Force" was charged with meeting this JCAHO safety goal and supporting Magnet forces number 6, 7 and 13. This presentation will take you through our journey to improve the quality of patient care, facilitate Nursing empowerment, ownership and pride in patient care and improve interdisciplinary collaboration. We chose ISBAR as our communication method. ISBAR is a communication tool that facilitates the exchange of essential patient information, empowers caregivers to summarize their assessment of the clinical situation and assertively ask for what they need to help their patients. Beyond the implementation of our "ISBAR, Do You?" campaign, the task force sought to define common hand-off situations that required a verbal hand-off (OR - PACU, OR -ICU, ED "In-patient unit, etc"). We engaged direct patient care providers to help develop content templates of the information that needed to be exchanged during hand-offs. Project implementation strategies, maintaining momentum, tools for quantifying success and future plans will all be presented. References: 1. Dixon J., et al; Skilled Communication: Making it Real.; AACN Advanced Critical Care; 17, 4 (2006) 376 - 382. 2. Haig K., et al; SBAR: A Shared Mental Model for Improving Communication Between Clinicians.; Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety; 32, 2 (2006) 167 - 175. 3. Joint Commission International Center for Patient Safety; Strategies to Improve Hand-off Comminucation: Implementing a process to Resolve Questions.(2005) @ www.jcipatientsafety,org/show.asp?durki=10742 4. Naik G.; New Formula: A Hospital Races to Learn Lessons Of Ferrari Pit Stop Auto Crew Teaches Surgeons Small Errors Can Add Up On the Track, or in the ICU.; Wall Street Journal; Nov. 14, 2006. 5. Patterson, E., et al; Handoff Strategies in Setting With High Consequences for Failure: Lessons for Health Care Operations.; International Journal for Quality in Health Care; 16, 2 (2004) 125 - 132. 6. Streitenberger K., et al; Handoffs in Care:Can We Make Them Safer?; Pediatric Clinics of North America; 53 (2006) 1185 - 1195.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleISBAR, Do You? Connecting Caregivers, Empowering Nurses and Celebrating Successful Communicationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZafian, Ruthannen_US
dc.contributor.authorJansky, Lynnen_US
dc.author.detailsRuthann Zafian, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut, USA, email: rzafian@harthosp.org; Lynn Jansky, RN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182667-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: Thousands of lives and billions of dollars are lost each year to healthcare communication errors. At one Illinois hospital, analyses of sentinel events demonstrated at least 65% of the events included problems with communications. Improving communication is imperative for these reasons as well as to comply with the 2006 JCAHO Safety goal (2E) of healthcare facilities implementing a standardized approach to hand-off communications, including the opportunity to ask and respond to questions. At a large (800 Bed) metropolitan New England Magnet hospital, a sub-group of the House-wide Healthcare Team called the "Hand-offs Task Force" was charged with meeting this JCAHO safety goal and supporting Magnet forces number 6, 7 and 13. This presentation will take you through our journey to improve the quality of patient care, facilitate Nursing empowerment, ownership and pride in patient care and improve interdisciplinary collaboration. We chose ISBAR as our communication method. ISBAR is a communication tool that facilitates the exchange of essential patient information, empowers caregivers to summarize their assessment of the clinical situation and assertively ask for what they need to help their patients. Beyond the implementation of our "ISBAR, Do You?" campaign, the task force sought to define common hand-off situations that required a verbal hand-off (OR - PACU, OR -ICU, ED "In-patient unit, etc"). We engaged direct patient care providers to help develop content templates of the information that needed to be exchanged during hand-offs. Project implementation strategies, maintaining momentum, tools for quantifying success and future plans will all be presented. References: 1. Dixon J., et al; Skilled Communication: Making it Real.; AACN Advanced Critical Care; 17, 4 (2006) 376 - 382. 2. Haig K., et al; SBAR: A Shared Mental Model for Improving Communication Between Clinicians.; Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety; 32, 2 (2006) 167 - 175. 3. Joint Commission International Center for Patient Safety; Strategies to Improve Hand-off Comminucation: Implementing a process to Resolve Questions.(2005) @ www.jcipatientsafety,org/show.asp?durki=10742 4. Naik G.; New Formula: A Hospital Races to Learn Lessons Of Ferrari Pit Stop Auto Crew Teaches Surgeons Small Errors Can Add Up On the Track, or in the ICU.; Wall Street Journal; Nov. 14, 2006. 5. Patterson, E., et al; Handoff Strategies in Setting With High Consequences for Failure: Lessons for Health Care Operations.; International Journal for Quality in Health Care; 16, 2 (2004) 125 - 132. 6. Streitenberger K., et al; Handoffs in Care:Can We Make Them Safer?; Pediatric Clinics of North America; 53 (2006) 1185 - 1195.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:34:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:34:35Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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