2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182668
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examination of Skin Lesions on Admission to the ICU
Author(s):
Zinnecker, Pam
Author Details:
Pam Zinnecker, RN, BAN, MSN, CCRN, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana, USA, email: pzinnecker@billingsclinic.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Patients admitted to an ICU are critically ill, often with mult-system condition. In rural areas this admission may have been preceded by a prolonged ambulance trip or prior admission to a rural facility. It is not known how this impacts pressure ulcer development or what types of additional skin lesions are observed on ICU admission. This study examined skin conditions and pressure ulcers present on ICU admission after initiation of a trigger tool for skin conditions. Further the relationship between transportation length, diagnosis and age were examined. Data was collected on all patients admitted to the ICU between May and August 2005. One hundred and four patients were admitted to the ICU with identified skin lesion. The majority of patients with a skin lesion had experienced trauma,(17%), respiratory (13.5%), or cardiac (11.5%) events .Eighteen patients (17%) were identified as having a pressure ulcer on admission.. Patients with pressure ulcers had experienced respiratory (28%), neurological (11%), or sepsis (11%) related problems. They spent approximately 72 minutes in ambulance transportation and/or 54 minutes in the ER. Nine persons were transported on a backboard, with average backboard time of 60 minutes. ICU nurses need to aware of the high rate of skin lesions present on ICU admission. Trauma patient frequently have abrasions that may be misidentified as reddened areas associated with pressure ulcers. Persons with long transportation time or backboard use may be more likely to have pressure related injuries.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamination of Skin Lesions on Admission to the ICUen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZinnecker, Pamen_US
dc.author.detailsPam Zinnecker, RN, BAN, MSN, CCRN, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana, USA, email: pzinnecker@billingsclinic.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182668-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Patients admitted to an ICU are critically ill, often with mult-system condition. In rural areas this admission may have been preceded by a prolonged ambulance trip or prior admission to a rural facility. It is not known how this impacts pressure ulcer development or what types of additional skin lesions are observed on ICU admission. This study examined skin conditions and pressure ulcers present on ICU admission after initiation of a trigger tool for skin conditions. Further the relationship between transportation length, diagnosis and age were examined. Data was collected on all patients admitted to the ICU between May and August 2005. One hundred and four patients were admitted to the ICU with identified skin lesion. The majority of patients with a skin lesion had experienced trauma,(17%), respiratory (13.5%), or cardiac (11.5%) events .Eighteen patients (17%) were identified as having a pressure ulcer on admission.. Patients with pressure ulcers had experienced respiratory (28%), neurological (11%), or sepsis (11%) related problems. They spent approximately 72 minutes in ambulance transportation and/or 54 minutes in the ER. Nine persons were transported on a backboard, with average backboard time of 60 minutes. ICU nurses need to aware of the high rate of skin lesions present on ICU admission. Trauma patient frequently have abrasions that may be misidentified as reddened areas associated with pressure ulcers. Persons with long transportation time or backboard use may be more likely to have pressure related injuries.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:34:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:34:38Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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