2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182669
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Transitioning Internationally Educated Nurses for Success
Author(s):
Adeniran, Rita K.; Youssef, Sangsoon; Gabriel, Melanie; Jost, Sandra
Author Details:
Rita Adeniran, MSN, RN, CMAC, CNAA, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: ritaka@nursing.upenn.edu; Sangsoon Youssef, MSN, RNC; Melanie Gabriel, BSN, RN; Sandra Jost MSN, RN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Migrant nurses contribute significantly to the host country healthcare systems but are often challenged by the acculturation process that must take place in order to practice safely and efficiently. This session will describe nurse executive innovations used to launch a program that mitigates the challenges of internationally recruited nurses. ABSTRACT: Globalization is a reality of the 21st century and demands that nursing have an international perspective. Magnet organizations are familiar with the inevitable products of globalization - immigration, global trade and cultural diversity - and are able to develop programs that are responsive to the product of globalization. Migration of healthcare professionals, specifically nurses, is one product of globalization, thus the increase in the numbers of internationally educated nurses in the U.S workforce. These nurses are often referred to as migrant nurses or Internationally Educated Nurses (IENs). While IENs contribute significantly to the host country healthcare system, they are often challenged by the acculturation process that must take place in order to practice safely and efficiently in their new practice areas. As evident in the relevant literature, migrating nurses may not be familiar with the host country colloquialisms and practice culture. This situation is often distressful to the IEN, as well as employing organizations. Thus, conscientious efforts must be made to ensure that effective programs are in place to mitigate the challenges of acculturating IENs into their new practice environment. This presentation will share the innovation of one nurse executive in a large academic center in launching the Transitioning Internationally Educated Nurses for Success (TIENS) Program. This program was developed to successfully support the integration of internationally educated nurses to their new practice areas. TIENS is a four phase program that begins the process of transition for the international nurses from the pre-arrival stage to the successful completion of the first year and beyond. TIENS can serve as a model approach to help aspiring Magnet organizations develop such a program to support successful integration of their internationally educated nurses. Other Magnet organizations can also acquire new knowledge to strengthen their programs. This presentation will describe the TIENS Program in order to share our success in this initiative.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTransitioning Internationally Educated Nurses for Successen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAdeniran, Rita K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYoussef, Sangsoonen_US
dc.contributor.authorGabriel, Melanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorJost, Sandraen_US
dc.author.detailsRita Adeniran, MSN, RN, CMAC, CNAA, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: ritaka@nursing.upenn.edu; Sangsoon Youssef, MSN, RNC; Melanie Gabriel, BSN, RN; Sandra Jost MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182669-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Migrant nurses contribute significantly to the host country healthcare systems but are often challenged by the acculturation process that must take place in order to practice safely and efficiently. This session will describe nurse executive innovations used to launch a program that mitigates the challenges of internationally recruited nurses. ABSTRACT: Globalization is a reality of the 21st century and demands that nursing have an international perspective. Magnet organizations are familiar with the inevitable products of globalization - immigration, global trade and cultural diversity - and are able to develop programs that are responsive to the product of globalization. Migration of healthcare professionals, specifically nurses, is one product of globalization, thus the increase in the numbers of internationally educated nurses in the U.S workforce. These nurses are often referred to as migrant nurses or Internationally Educated Nurses (IENs). While IENs contribute significantly to the host country healthcare system, they are often challenged by the acculturation process that must take place in order to practice safely and efficiently in their new practice areas. As evident in the relevant literature, migrating nurses may not be familiar with the host country colloquialisms and practice culture. This situation is often distressful to the IEN, as well as employing organizations. Thus, conscientious efforts must be made to ensure that effective programs are in place to mitigate the challenges of acculturating IENs into their new practice environment. This presentation will share the innovation of one nurse executive in a large academic center in launching the Transitioning Internationally Educated Nurses for Success (TIENS) Program. This program was developed to successfully support the integration of internationally educated nurses to their new practice areas. TIENS is a four phase program that begins the process of transition for the international nurses from the pre-arrival stage to the successful completion of the first year and beyond. TIENS can serve as a model approach to help aspiring Magnet organizations develop such a program to support successful integration of their internationally educated nurses. Other Magnet organizations can also acquire new knowledge to strengthen their programs. This presentation will describe the TIENS Program in order to share our success in this initiative.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:34:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:34:41Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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