2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182671
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Do You See What I See?: Understanding Figures and Tables in Publication
Author(s):
Albert, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Albert, PhD, CCNS, CCRN, CAN, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: albertn@ccf.org
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: To understand evidence-based practice, nurses must be able to interpret research literature and findings displayed in figures and tables. Using examples from published literature, this session focuses on explaining the meaning of common figures and tables utilized in research articles. ABSTRACT: Background: One barrier to evidence-based practice and initiating research is misperceptions about published literature on a topic. Written words may over-emphasize a point (i.e., the risk was tripled when X was used instead of Yà) or a table or figure displaying results of 2 groups may look impressive in print but analyses might be missing that provide evidence of differences between groups. Ultimately, nurses may be unable to interpret what is viewed or may have misperceptions about research if they used faulty logic in interpreting what is viewed. Plan: This session is a fun, interactive way to help nurses increase understanding of published figures and tables that display research results. Examples will be displayed and discussed. Topics selected encompass analysis methodologies commonly displayed in figures and tables in medical and nursing research journals. Figure types include: histograms, pie charts, line charts (including Kaplan-Meier survivor function plot), scatter plots with an explanation of how to interpret r and R2, figures depicting multivariable or multivariate results including beta's of each component and significance, and risk ratios (hazard, odds or relative risk) including what the line of identity and 95% confidence intervals depict. Table types include descriptive, correlational and risk ratios. Conclusions: Reviewing current literature is an essential step in evidence-based practices, however, it may be intimidating for nurses to draw conclusions from figures and tables they read in journals or view during a scientific presentation because they are not sure how to interpret what they see accurately. This session will enhance skills and ultimately make it more enjoyable for nurses to view actual research results rather than depending on potentially biased interpretation of findings. REFERENCES: 1. Schechtman E. Odds ratio, relative risk, absolute risk reduction, and the number needed to treat-which of these should we use? International Society For Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research 2002;5(5):431-436. 2. Pepe MS, Janes H, Longton G, Leisenring W, Newcomb P. Limitations of the odds ratio in gauging the performance of a diagnostic, prognostic, or screening marker. American Journal of Epidemiology. 2004;159(9):882-890.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDo You See What I See?: Understanding Figures and Tables in Publicationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlbert, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Albert, PhD, CCNS, CCRN, CAN, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: albertn@ccf.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182671-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: To understand evidence-based practice, nurses must be able to interpret research literature and findings displayed in figures and tables. Using examples from published literature, this session focuses on explaining the meaning of common figures and tables utilized in research articles. ABSTRACT: Background: One barrier to evidence-based practice and initiating research is misperceptions about published literature on a topic. Written words may over-emphasize a point (i.e., the risk was tripled when X was used instead of Yà) or a table or figure displaying results of 2 groups may look impressive in print but analyses might be missing that provide evidence of differences between groups. Ultimately, nurses may be unable to interpret what is viewed or may have misperceptions about research if they used faulty logic in interpreting what is viewed. Plan: This session is a fun, interactive way to help nurses increase understanding of published figures and tables that display research results. Examples will be displayed and discussed. Topics selected encompass analysis methodologies commonly displayed in figures and tables in medical and nursing research journals. Figure types include: histograms, pie charts, line charts (including Kaplan-Meier survivor function plot), scatter plots with an explanation of how to interpret r and R2, figures depicting multivariable or multivariate results including beta's of each component and significance, and risk ratios (hazard, odds or relative risk) including what the line of identity and 95% confidence intervals depict. Table types include descriptive, correlational and risk ratios. Conclusions: Reviewing current literature is an essential step in evidence-based practices, however, it may be intimidating for nurses to draw conclusions from figures and tables they read in journals or view during a scientific presentation because they are not sure how to interpret what they see accurately. This session will enhance skills and ultimately make it more enjoyable for nurses to view actual research results rather than depending on potentially biased interpretation of findings. REFERENCES: 1. Schechtman E. Odds ratio, relative risk, absolute risk reduction, and the number needed to treat-which of these should we use? International Society For Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research 2002;5(5):431-436. 2. Pepe MS, Janes H, Longton G, Leisenring W, Newcomb P. Limitations of the odds ratio in gauging the performance of a diagnostic, prognostic, or screening marker. American Journal of Epidemiology. 2004;159(9):882-890.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:34:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:34:46Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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