2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182672
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Child Deaths in the Emergency Department: Compassion, Information, and Hope
Author(s):
Allen, Marianne; Baldwin, Edie
Author Details:
Marianne Allen, MN, RNC, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: MAllen@Pinnaclehealth.org; Edie Baldwin, RN, BSN, SANE-A
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: The death of a child in the emergency department is tragic, evoking shock and grief by the family; it also impacts the staff caring for the child. This session will describe an interdisciplinary initiative to improve services to families with critically-ill children in the emergency department and how to support staff involved in these cases. ABSTRACT: Nurses are inspired to personal and professional excellence in providing sensitive care and support to patients and families they serve. Staff nurses identified the need to provide improved end-of-life care of children and their families in the emergency department. Often, the death of a child is a sudden event. Even when the death is anticipated, the impacts of child death on families and staff are significant. A child death is often a coroner's case, with the child's clothing and possessions removed as evidence. Families leave the hospital not only without their child, but also without any of his possessions. An interdisciplinary group, lead by the clinical nurse specialist for perinatal bereavement services, met to describe current management of families having a child die in the emergency department, identify barriers to providing sensitive care to families, and develop initiatives to improve the care to this population. The group included emergency department and hospice managers, educators, inpatient and hospice social workers, and nurses. Outcomes include: Standards of care/ revision of emergency department policies/ procedures; Communication and care work sheet; Pastoral care support for cultural and spiritual needs; List of community resources for families; Written materials for families; Mementos that had contact with child; Mementoes that had contact with child: memory boxes, clothing, blankets to soften the appearance of the child; Follow-up contact with families; Children remembered at annual services for patients who died at our facilities; Staff education re: end of life care for children and families and services provided through initiative; Caregiver support; and For parents of critically-ill children, brochures for several tertiary care referral centers, with emergency department phone number, accepting physician, driving directions/ maps, lodging, dining information. In 2007, 6 children died in our emergency departments and 107 critically-ill children were transferred to referral medical centers. Through this program, families have received sensitive support, information, and the opportunity to have tangible mementos of their child in an environment of compassion and hope. Staff has also felt supported by having clear guidelines for care, and the ability to offer mementoes, support and follow-up to families having a critically-ill child or a child who has died. REFERENCES: 1. Midland, D.; Gensch, B. & Rybarik, F. (2004) RTS Perinatal Bereavement Training in Pregnancy Loss and Newborn Death. Wisconsin: Gunderson Lutheran Medical Foundation. 2. Knapp, J et al. (2005) Death of a Child in the Emergency Department: AAP Policy Technical report. Pediatrics, 115 (5), 1432-1437. 3. AAP (1999) Investigation and Review of Unexpected Infant and Child Deaths. Pediatrics, 104 (5), 1158-1159. (Current as of 11/16/2005)
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChild Deaths in the Emergency Department: Compassion, Information, and Hopeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Marianneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Edieen_US
dc.author.detailsMarianne Allen, MN, RNC, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: MAllen@Pinnaclehealth.org; Edie Baldwin, RN, BSN, SANE-Aen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182672-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: The death of a child in the emergency department is tragic, evoking shock and grief by the family; it also impacts the staff caring for the child. This session will describe an interdisciplinary initiative to improve services to families with critically-ill children in the emergency department and how to support staff involved in these cases. ABSTRACT: Nurses are inspired to personal and professional excellence in providing sensitive care and support to patients and families they serve. Staff nurses identified the need to provide improved end-of-life care of children and their families in the emergency department. Often, the death of a child is a sudden event. Even when the death is anticipated, the impacts of child death on families and staff are significant. A child death is often a coroner's case, with the child's clothing and possessions removed as evidence. Families leave the hospital not only without their child, but also without any of his possessions. An interdisciplinary group, lead by the clinical nurse specialist for perinatal bereavement services, met to describe current management of families having a child die in the emergency department, identify barriers to providing sensitive care to families, and develop initiatives to improve the care to this population. The group included emergency department and hospice managers, educators, inpatient and hospice social workers, and nurses. Outcomes include: Standards of care/ revision of emergency department policies/ procedures; Communication and care work sheet; Pastoral care support for cultural and spiritual needs; List of community resources for families; Written materials for families; Mementos that had contact with child; Mementoes that had contact with child: memory boxes, clothing, blankets to soften the appearance of the child; Follow-up contact with families; Children remembered at annual services for patients who died at our facilities; Staff education re: end of life care for children and families and services provided through initiative; Caregiver support; and For parents of critically-ill children, brochures for several tertiary care referral centers, with emergency department phone number, accepting physician, driving directions/ maps, lodging, dining information. In 2007, 6 children died in our emergency departments and 107 critically-ill children were transferred to referral medical centers. Through this program, families have received sensitive support, information, and the opportunity to have tangible mementos of their child in an environment of compassion and hope. Staff has also felt supported by having clear guidelines for care, and the ability to offer mementoes, support and follow-up to families having a critically-ill child or a child who has died. REFERENCES: 1. Midland, D.; Gensch, B. & Rybarik, F. (2004) RTS Perinatal Bereavement Training in Pregnancy Loss and Newborn Death. Wisconsin: Gunderson Lutheran Medical Foundation. 2. Knapp, J et al. (2005) Death of a Child in the Emergency Department: AAP Policy Technical report. Pediatrics, 115 (5), 1432-1437. 3. AAP (1999) Investigation and Review of Unexpected Infant and Child Deaths. Pediatrics, 104 (5), 1158-1159. (Current as of 11/16/2005)en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:34:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:34:49Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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