2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182673
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Administration of Local Anesthetic Agents to Decrease Pain
Author(s):
Anderson, Steven; Cockrell, Jean
Author Details:
Steven Anderson, RN, BSN, Rex Healthcare, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA, email: steven.anderson@rexhealth.com; Jean Cockrell, RN,BSN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Purpose: This study is to compare a variety of local anesthetic agents and the administration methods prior to starting an intravenous device to determine which method is most comfortable for the patient. Methods: A randomized, double-blind placebo, pretest-posttest, experimental design was used to compare five treatment groups of a total 86 study subjects in an Emergency Department (anesthetic spray; placebo spray; anesthetic intradermal injection; placebo intradermal injection; and a control group with no local anesthetic agent). The primary dependent variable was the patient's pain level at the IV insertion site before and after local anesthetic agent application, as well as after IV catheter insertion. Results: Anesthetic intradermal injection was found to have significantly higher pain ratings 1 minute after application compared to the other treatment groups (F4,79 = 3.76, p = 0.008). Pain ratings 3 minutes after IV insertion were found to be similar for the 5 treatment groups (F4, 71 = 0.79, p = 0.533). Significant decreases in vein quality after intradermal injections for both anesthetic and placebo groups were found compared to the topical sprays and control groups (Chi Square = 16.4, df = 8, p = 0.037). Conclusions: The use of an intradermal anesthetic agent prior to IV insertion caused a significant increase in pain immediately after administration and degradation of vein quality. Pain scores after IV insertion were not significantly different for the 5 groups. REFERENCES: 1. Brown, D. (2004). Local anesthesia for vein cannulation. RN, 27 ,(2), 85-88. 2. Brown, J. (2003). Using lidocaine for peripheral IV insertions: Patients' preferences and pain experiences. Medical Surgical Nursing, 12(2), 95-101. 3. Collins, S., Moore, A., & McQuay, H. (1997). The visual analogue pain intensity scale: What is moderate pain in millimeters. International Association For the Study of Pain, 72, 95-97. 4. Lee, K., & Kieckhefer, G. (1989). Technical notes: Measuring human responses using Visual analogue scales. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 11(1), 129-132. 5. Lysakowski, C., Dumont, L., Tramer, M., & Tassonyi, E. (2003). A needle-free jet-injection system with lidocaine for peripheral intravenous cannula insertion: A randomized controlled trial with cost-effectiveness analysis. Anesthesia Analg, 96, 215-219. 6. Palmon, S., Lloyd, A., & Kirsch, J. (1998). The effect of needle gauge and lidocaine pH on pain during intradermal injection. Anesthesia Analg, 86, 379-381. 7. Perry, A. & Potter, P. (2002). Clinical Nursing Skills and Techniques, 5TH ED., St. Louis, MO: Mosby. 8. Peter, D., Scott, J., Watkins, H., & Frasure, H. (2002); Subcutaneous lidocaine delivered by jet- Injector for pain control before IV catheterization in the ED- The patients perception and preference. American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 20(6), 562-566. 9. Vaghadia, H., Al-Ahdal, O., & Nevin, K. (1997); EMLA patch for intravenous cannulation in adult surgical outpatients. Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, 44(8), 798-802. 10. Zsigmond, E., Darby, P., Koenig, H.,& Goll, E. (1999). Painless intravenous catheterization by intradermal jet injection of lidocaine: A randomized trial. Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, 11, 87-94. 11. Cohen J. Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences, revised edition. Academic Press: New York, 1977, page 317. 12. Foul F, Erdfleder E. GPOWER: A...[Please contact the primary investigator for additional references.]
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdministration of Local Anesthetic Agents to Decrease Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Stevenen_US
dc.contributor.authorCockrell, Jeanen_US
dc.author.detailsSteven Anderson, RN, BSN, Rex Healthcare, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA, email: steven.anderson@rexhealth.com; Jean Cockrell, RN,BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182673-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Purpose: This study is to compare a variety of local anesthetic agents and the administration methods prior to starting an intravenous device to determine which method is most comfortable for the patient. Methods: A randomized, double-blind placebo, pretest-posttest, experimental design was used to compare five treatment groups of a total 86 study subjects in an Emergency Department (anesthetic spray; placebo spray; anesthetic intradermal injection; placebo intradermal injection; and a control group with no local anesthetic agent). The primary dependent variable was the patient's pain level at the IV insertion site before and after local anesthetic agent application, as well as after IV catheter insertion. Results: Anesthetic intradermal injection was found to have significantly higher pain ratings 1 minute after application compared to the other treatment groups (F4,79 = 3.76, p = 0.008). Pain ratings 3 minutes after IV insertion were found to be similar for the 5 treatment groups (F4, 71 = 0.79, p = 0.533). Significant decreases in vein quality after intradermal injections for both anesthetic and placebo groups were found compared to the topical sprays and control groups (Chi Square = 16.4, df = 8, p = 0.037). Conclusions: The use of an intradermal anesthetic agent prior to IV insertion caused a significant increase in pain immediately after administration and degradation of vein quality. Pain scores after IV insertion were not significantly different for the 5 groups. REFERENCES: 1. Brown, D. (2004). Local anesthesia for vein cannulation. RN, 27 ,(2), 85-88. 2. Brown, J. (2003). Using lidocaine for peripheral IV insertions: Patients' preferences and pain experiences. Medical Surgical Nursing, 12(2), 95-101. 3. Collins, S., Moore, A., & McQuay, H. (1997). The visual analogue pain intensity scale: What is moderate pain in millimeters. International Association For the Study of Pain, 72, 95-97. 4. Lee, K., & Kieckhefer, G. (1989). Technical notes: Measuring human responses using Visual analogue scales. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 11(1), 129-132. 5. Lysakowski, C., Dumont, L., Tramer, M., & Tassonyi, E. (2003). A needle-free jet-injection system with lidocaine for peripheral intravenous cannula insertion: A randomized controlled trial with cost-effectiveness analysis. Anesthesia Analg, 96, 215-219. 6. Palmon, S., Lloyd, A., & Kirsch, J. (1998). The effect of needle gauge and lidocaine pH on pain during intradermal injection. Anesthesia Analg, 86, 379-381. 7. Perry, A. & Potter, P. (2002). Clinical Nursing Skills and Techniques, 5TH ED., St. Louis, MO: Mosby. 8. Peter, D., Scott, J., Watkins, H., & Frasure, H. (2002); Subcutaneous lidocaine delivered by jet- Injector for pain control before IV catheterization in the ED- The patients perception and preference. American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 20(6), 562-566. 9. Vaghadia, H., Al-Ahdal, O., & Nevin, K. (1997); EMLA patch for intravenous cannulation in adult surgical outpatients. Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, 44(8), 798-802. 10. Zsigmond, E., Darby, P., Koenig, H.,& Goll, E. (1999). Painless intravenous catheterization by intradermal jet injection of lidocaine: A randomized trial. Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, 11, 87-94. 11. Cohen J. Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences, revised edition. Academic Press: New York, 1977, page 317. 12. Foul F, Erdfleder E. GPOWER: A...[Please contact the primary investigator for additional references.]en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:34:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:34:51Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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