2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182676
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies for Promoting Nursing Research Integrity in Clinical Settings
Author(s):
Barrett, Roseann
Author Details:
Roseann Barrett, PhD, RN, St. Joseph Hospital, Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, email: rbarrett@sjh-nh.org
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This presentation will describe a study done on the processes used by Magnet hospitals to promote the integrity of nursing research in clinical settings. ABSTRACTS: The pace and growth of nursing research has been faster than our understanding of ethical issues and social considerations that are of paramount importance in the conduct of science (1). Although nursing research efforts in clinical settings have increased, there is little evidence of an infrastructure to promote nursing research integrity. Magnet hospitals must be able to demonstrate the presence of well established and operationalized processes for research and evidence - based practice. By understanding the processes used by these institutions, strategies may be identified to promote the scientific integrity of nursing research in clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to describe the processes used in Magnet hospitals to promote the scientific integrity of nursing research. A descriptive design was used to conduct this investigation. A modified version of Lenz and Ketefian's (2) 21 item questionnaire was mailed to individuals representing Magnet designated hospitals and healthcare systems. In addition, an invitation to participate in the investigation was posted on a Magnet nursing research listserv. Results of this study indicate that a majority of the hospitals in this sample used multiple processes to promote the responsible conduct of nursing research. The most frequent pattern of nursing research oversight was one in which a nurse researcher, nursing research council, and IRB reviewed the project. IRBs were the most frequently reported source of guidelines, processes for protecting the rights of human participants, and identifying potential or actual risks to nursing research integrity. Consultation with an expert nurse researcher and review by a nursing research council were also important methods, but utilized less frequently. Nurses new to research were educated about research integrity in a variety of ways; the most common process reported was individual consultation with a nursing research expert or mentor. Guidelines for other components of research integrity such as data stewardship and management, authorship, plagiarism, and conflicts of interest were available at less than half of the hospitals. The Magnet hospitals surveyed relied on a combination of IRB oversight, expert advisement and peer review to promote the integrity of nursing research. Advisement by expert nursing research mentors or consultants was an essential factor in cultivating research integrity. REFERENCES: 1. Ketefian, S. (2001). The challenge for nursing research: Scientific integrity. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 7, 227 - 8. 2. Lenz, E. & Ketefian, S. (1995). Promoting scientific integrity in nursing research Part I: Current approaches in doctoral programs. Journal of Professional Nursing, 11 (4), 213 - 9.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies for Promoting Nursing Research Integrity in Clinical Settingsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Roseannen_US
dc.author.detailsRoseann Barrett, PhD, RN, St. Joseph Hospital, Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, email: rbarrett@sjh-nh.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182676-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This presentation will describe a study done on the processes used by Magnet hospitals to promote the integrity of nursing research in clinical settings. ABSTRACTS: The pace and growth of nursing research has been faster than our understanding of ethical issues and social considerations that are of paramount importance in the conduct of science (1). Although nursing research efforts in clinical settings have increased, there is little evidence of an infrastructure to promote nursing research integrity. Magnet hospitals must be able to demonstrate the presence of well established and operationalized processes for research and evidence - based practice. By understanding the processes used by these institutions, strategies may be identified to promote the scientific integrity of nursing research in clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to describe the processes used in Magnet hospitals to promote the scientific integrity of nursing research. A descriptive design was used to conduct this investigation. A modified version of Lenz and Ketefian's (2) 21 item questionnaire was mailed to individuals representing Magnet designated hospitals and healthcare systems. In addition, an invitation to participate in the investigation was posted on a Magnet nursing research listserv. Results of this study indicate that a majority of the hospitals in this sample used multiple processes to promote the responsible conduct of nursing research. The most frequent pattern of nursing research oversight was one in which a nurse researcher, nursing research council, and IRB reviewed the project. IRBs were the most frequently reported source of guidelines, processes for protecting the rights of human participants, and identifying potential or actual risks to nursing research integrity. Consultation with an expert nurse researcher and review by a nursing research council were also important methods, but utilized less frequently. Nurses new to research were educated about research integrity in a variety of ways; the most common process reported was individual consultation with a nursing research expert or mentor. Guidelines for other components of research integrity such as data stewardship and management, authorship, plagiarism, and conflicts of interest were available at less than half of the hospitals. The Magnet hospitals surveyed relied on a combination of IRB oversight, expert advisement and peer review to promote the integrity of nursing research. Advisement by expert nursing research mentors or consultants was an essential factor in cultivating research integrity. REFERENCES: 1. Ketefian, S. (2001). The challenge for nursing research: Scientific integrity. International Journal of Nursing Practice, 7, 227 - 8. 2. Lenz, E. & Ketefian, S. (1995). Promoting scientific integrity in nursing research Part I: Current approaches in doctoral programs. Journal of Professional Nursing, 11 (4), 213 - 9.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:34:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:34:59Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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