2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182678
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating a Policy for Family Presence During Resuscitation
Author(s):
Basol, Roberta
Author Details:
Roberta Basol, St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, Minnesota, USA, email: basolr@centracare.com
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Following requests by family members to be present during resuscitation of their loved ones and the controversy of permitting family presence, a research study was done to determine attitudes, concerns, and beliefs related to family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The study supported a policy with approval from nursing and medicine. ABSTRACT: National guidelines and professional organizations have recommended allowing family presence during resuscitation and bedside invasive procedures (BIP).1 Studies found only 5 percent of critical care units have written policies. 2 Periodic requests by family members prompted the creation of a task force, including nurses, physicians, and respiratory therapists, to develop this controversial policy. Prior to development, a research study of health care personnel attitudes, concerns, and beliefs toward family presence during CPR and BIP was done. The sample included multiple disciplines across the organization as many usually participate in the resuscitation process. Previous studies typically included only emergency room and critical care nurses and physicians. 3 A descriptive and correlational study was conducted using the 16-item Family Presence and Support: Staff Assessment Survey. Items were rated on a 5 point Likert agreement scale, yes-no response, or open-ended questions. Surveys were distributed to staff and management RNs, physicians, CRNAs, respiratory therapists, orderlies, and spiritual care staff. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations were applied for data analysis. 1402 surveys were distributed with a 45% response rate. Support for a policy giving an option for family presence was reported at 61.3%. Study findings showed support for family presence by critical care and emergency room nurses. CRNAs were least likely to support family presence at 17.6% whereas RNs reported support at 65.4%. RNs felt family members should have the option to be present more than non-RNs (p=.000). RNs also felt family members should have the option to be present more than physicians (p=.000). Findings revealed both support and non-support for families to be present during CPR. Survey results were shared with the task force, who then supported the need for, and developed a policy. The policy, which allows family presence as an option if all members of the resuscitation team agree, was approved by clinical and administrative nurse practice committees and medical staff departments. Education on the process to provide support to families was provided to critical care and emergency room nurses and spiritual care staff. Providing family presence as an option offers an opportunity for reluctant healthcare team members to refuse their presence and an opportunity for those who support family presence to welcome the family. REFERENCES: American Associate of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN). (2004). Practice alert: Family presence during CPR and invasive procedures. Retrieved January, 2008 from www.aacn.org Emergency Nurses Association (ENA). (1995). Emergency nurses association position statements: Family presence at the bedside during invasive procedures and/or resuscitation. Journal of Emergency Nursing, 21(2), 26A. McClenathan, B. M., Torrington, K. G., & Uyehara, C. F. T. (2002). Family member presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A survey of US and international critical care professionals. Chest, 122(6), 2204-2211. Meyers, T. A., Eichhorn, D. J., Guzzetta, C. E., Clark, A. P., Klein, J. D., & Taliaferro, E. et al. (2000). Family presence during invasive procedures and resuscitation: The experience of family members, nurses, and physicians. American Journal of Nursing, 100(2), 32-43. Moreland, P. (2005). Family presence during invasive procedures and resuscitation in the emergency department: A review of the literature. Journal of Emergency Nursing, 31(1), 58-72. 2 MacLean, S. L., Guzzetta, C. E., White, C., Fontaine, D., Eichhorn, D. J., & Meyers, T. A. et al. (2003). Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures: Practices of critical care and emergency nurses. American Journal of Critical Care, 12(3), 246-257. 3 Boudreaux, E. D., Francis, J. L., & Loyacano, T. (2002). Family presence during invasive procedures and resuscitations in the emergency department: A critical review and suggestions for future research. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 40(2), 193-205. Jarvis, A. S. (1998). Parental presence during resuscitation: Attitudes of staff on a paediatric intensive care unit. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 14(1), 3-7. McGahey, P. R. (2002). Family presence during pediatric resuscitation: A focus on staff. Critical Care Nurse, 22(6), 29-34. Moreland, P. (2005). Family presence during invasive procedures in the pediatric intensive care unit: A prospective study. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 153(9), 955-8.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating a Policy for Family Presence During Resuscitationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBasol, Robertaen_US
dc.author.detailsRoberta Basol, St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, Minnesota, USA, email: basolr@centracare.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182678-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Following requests by family members to be present during resuscitation of their loved ones and the controversy of permitting family presence, a research study was done to determine attitudes, concerns, and beliefs related to family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The study supported a policy with approval from nursing and medicine. ABSTRACT: National guidelines and professional organizations have recommended allowing family presence during resuscitation and bedside invasive procedures (BIP).1 Studies found only 5 percent of critical care units have written policies. 2 Periodic requests by family members prompted the creation of a task force, including nurses, physicians, and respiratory therapists, to develop this controversial policy. Prior to development, a research study of health care personnel attitudes, concerns, and beliefs toward family presence during CPR and BIP was done. The sample included multiple disciplines across the organization as many usually participate in the resuscitation process. Previous studies typically included only emergency room and critical care nurses and physicians. 3 A descriptive and correlational study was conducted using the 16-item Family Presence and Support: Staff Assessment Survey. Items were rated on a 5 point Likert agreement scale, yes-no response, or open-ended questions. Surveys were distributed to staff and management RNs, physicians, CRNAs, respiratory therapists, orderlies, and spiritual care staff. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlations were applied for data analysis. 1402 surveys were distributed with a 45% response rate. Support for a policy giving an option for family presence was reported at 61.3%. Study findings showed support for family presence by critical care and emergency room nurses. CRNAs were least likely to support family presence at 17.6% whereas RNs reported support at 65.4%. RNs felt family members should have the option to be present more than non-RNs (p=.000). RNs also felt family members should have the option to be present more than physicians (p=.000). Findings revealed both support and non-support for families to be present during CPR. Survey results were shared with the task force, who then supported the need for, and developed a policy. The policy, which allows family presence as an option if all members of the resuscitation team agree, was approved by clinical and administrative nurse practice committees and medical staff departments. Education on the process to provide support to families was provided to critical care and emergency room nurses and spiritual care staff. Providing family presence as an option offers an opportunity for reluctant healthcare team members to refuse their presence and an opportunity for those who support family presence to welcome the family. REFERENCES: American Associate of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN). (2004). Practice alert: Family presence during CPR and invasive procedures. Retrieved January, 2008 from www.aacn.org Emergency Nurses Association (ENA). (1995). Emergency nurses association position statements: Family presence at the bedside during invasive procedures and/or resuscitation. Journal of Emergency Nursing, 21(2), 26A. McClenathan, B. M., Torrington, K. G., & Uyehara, C. F. T. (2002). Family member presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A survey of US and international critical care professionals. Chest, 122(6), 2204-2211. Meyers, T. A., Eichhorn, D. J., Guzzetta, C. E., Clark, A. P., Klein, J. D., & Taliaferro, E. et al. (2000). Family presence during invasive procedures and resuscitation: The experience of family members, nurses, and physicians. American Journal of Nursing, 100(2), 32-43. Moreland, P. (2005). Family presence during invasive procedures and resuscitation in the emergency department: A review of the literature. Journal of Emergency Nursing, 31(1), 58-72. 2 MacLean, S. L., Guzzetta, C. E., White, C., Fontaine, D., Eichhorn, D. J., & Meyers, T. A. et al. (2003). Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures: Practices of critical care and emergency nurses. American Journal of Critical Care, 12(3), 246-257. 3 Boudreaux, E. D., Francis, J. L., & Loyacano, T. (2002). Family presence during invasive procedures and resuscitations in the emergency department: A critical review and suggestions for future research. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 40(2), 193-205. Jarvis, A. S. (1998). Parental presence during resuscitation: Attitudes of staff on a paediatric intensive care unit. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 14(1), 3-7. McGahey, P. R. (2002). Family presence during pediatric resuscitation: A focus on staff. Critical Care Nurse, 22(6), 29-34. Moreland, P. (2005). Family presence during invasive procedures in the pediatric intensive care unit: A prospective study. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 153(9), 955-8.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:35:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:35:05Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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