2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182682
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Admission-Discharge-Teaching Nurses: Creative Strategies for an Aging Workforce
Author(s):
Blankenship, Jean; Winslow, Susan
Author Details:
Jean Blankenship, MSN, APRN BC, CDE, Martha Jefferson Hospital, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: jean.blankenship@mjh.org; Susan Winslow
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: The Admission-Discharge-Teaching (ADT) nurse role was implemented in our community hospital in 2001. This flexible position, without the physical and technological demands of standard beside nursing, was created as a strategy for attracting inactive nurses back into clinical practice. Now a budgeted position on each of our medical-surgical units, the ADT position has increased staff morale and nursing satisfaction measures, and has aided in the retention of nurses approaching retirement age, as well as recruitment of inactive nurses back into practice. It is also helping to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements related to clinical practice standards, as these nurses focus on the educational and discharge needs of their patients. Background: The United States is facing a national nursing shortage at a time when over 60% of the current registered nurse workforce is over the age of 40. Strategies are needed to increase the supply of RNs, while simultaneously addressing the particular needs of an aging workforce. The creation of flexible positions that retain experienced nurses, or attract inactive nurses back into the workforce is one strategy for impacting the nursing shortage and preventing the loss of a large volume of clinical experience and expert knowledge. Content covered: 1. The role of the ADT nurse: job duties and competencies 2. Impact of ADT role on staff and patient satisfaction 3. Financial impact of ADT role 4. Using the ADT role to ensure oversight compliance and clinical standards of care. 5. Enhancing retention and recruitment through creative staffing options. REFERENCES: Blankenship, J, Winslow, S. Admission-Discharge-Teaching Nurses: Bridging the Gap in Today's Workforce. JONA 2003; 33(11-13). Buerhaus, P, Staiger, D, Aurerbach, D. Policy responses to an aging registered nurse workforce. Nurs Econ. 2000; 21(2): 84-89.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdmission-Discharge-Teaching Nurses: Creative Strategies for an Aging Workforceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBlankenship, Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWinslow, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsJean Blankenship, MSN, APRN BC, CDE, Martha Jefferson Hospital, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: jean.blankenship@mjh.org; Susan Winslowen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182682-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: The Admission-Discharge-Teaching (ADT) nurse role was implemented in our community hospital in 2001. This flexible position, without the physical and technological demands of standard beside nursing, was created as a strategy for attracting inactive nurses back into clinical practice. Now a budgeted position on each of our medical-surgical units, the ADT position has increased staff morale and nursing satisfaction measures, and has aided in the retention of nurses approaching retirement age, as well as recruitment of inactive nurses back into practice. It is also helping to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements related to clinical practice standards, as these nurses focus on the educational and discharge needs of their patients. Background: The United States is facing a national nursing shortage at a time when over 60% of the current registered nurse workforce is over the age of 40. Strategies are needed to increase the supply of RNs, while simultaneously addressing the particular needs of an aging workforce. The creation of flexible positions that retain experienced nurses, or attract inactive nurses back into the workforce is one strategy for impacting the nursing shortage and preventing the loss of a large volume of clinical experience and expert knowledge. Content covered: 1. The role of the ADT nurse: job duties and competencies 2. Impact of ADT role on staff and patient satisfaction 3. Financial impact of ADT role 4. Using the ADT role to ensure oversight compliance and clinical standards of care. 5. Enhancing retention and recruitment through creative staffing options. REFERENCES: Blankenship, J, Winslow, S. Admission-Discharge-Teaching Nurses: Bridging the Gap in Today's Workforce. JONA 2003; 33(11-13). Buerhaus, P, Staiger, D, Aurerbach, D. Policy responses to an aging registered nurse workforce. Nurs Econ. 2000; 21(2): 84-89.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:35:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:35:15Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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