2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182685
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses Taking Action to Transform Care at the Bedside
Author(s):
Boehm, Heidi; Bryant, Summer
Author Details:
Heidi Boehm, University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas, USA, email: hboehm@kumc.edu; Summer Bryant
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: The nurse at the bedside is an invaluable source of ideas and information on improving patient care and the work environment. This session will present a model for empowering the bedside staff to improve staff satisfaction, reduce harm, improve the patient experience and reduce waste. ABSTRACT: The challenges facing healthcare are no secret. They range from staff turnover, to incidents of patient harm, to unhappy and dissatisfied patients and the perception by many (including payers) of excessive waste. For these and many other reasons, the hospital joined a collaborative with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) focused on improving each of these four areas and creating a positive change in the way care is delivered at the patient's bedside. This initiative has been staff-led from its onset. Beginning with one medical/surgical unit, the first group of staff receiving trained returned to the hospital energized and ready to identify as many improvement opportunities as possible. They began a series of "snorkel" sessions, designed to involve all of the staff on the unit in generating ideas for improvement. Since the inception of this initiative, hundreds of ideas have been generated and implemented by the staff on the unit. Using the "small tests of change model," the staff have piloted their ideas on a small scale to gain input from their stakeholders on the effectiveness of the ideas and continued adapting the ideas using ongoing small tests of change until the improvement is ready to be fully implemented. The results have been higher levels of safety and reliability for patients (53% decrease in falls), increased patient centeredness (nearly 5-fold increase in patient satisfaction), enhanced vitality of the care team (25% reduction in turnover) and increased levels of value-added time spent by staff in the care of patients. Collaboration of the entire care team on the unit has also been enhanced, as evidenced by the successful implementation of quiet time on the unit; an initiative supported by physicians, ancillary care, support departments, visitors and patients. The work of the team is now being spread to eight other units in the hospital. And the people helping facilitate the spread are the staff who led this initiative from the outset. Perhaps one of the greatest intangible benefits has been the empowerment and engagement of the staff, as evidenced by results on the NDNQI nursing satisfaction survey. This presentation will provide an overview of the various components which comprise this collaborative, lessons learned during this two-year journey, and ideas on how other institutions can take and use this model to improve their patient care environment.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses Taking Action to Transform Care at the Bedsideen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoehm, Heidien_US
dc.contributor.authorBryant, Summeren_US
dc.author.detailsHeidi Boehm, University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas, USA, email: hboehm@kumc.edu; Summer Bryanten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182685-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: The nurse at the bedside is an invaluable source of ideas and information on improving patient care and the work environment. This session will present a model for empowering the bedside staff to improve staff satisfaction, reduce harm, improve the patient experience and reduce waste. ABSTRACT: The challenges facing healthcare are no secret. They range from staff turnover, to incidents of patient harm, to unhappy and dissatisfied patients and the perception by many (including payers) of excessive waste. For these and many other reasons, the hospital joined a collaborative with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) focused on improving each of these four areas and creating a positive change in the way care is delivered at the patient's bedside. This initiative has been staff-led from its onset. Beginning with one medical/surgical unit, the first group of staff receiving trained returned to the hospital energized and ready to identify as many improvement opportunities as possible. They began a series of "snorkel" sessions, designed to involve all of the staff on the unit in generating ideas for improvement. Since the inception of this initiative, hundreds of ideas have been generated and implemented by the staff on the unit. Using the "small tests of change model," the staff have piloted their ideas on a small scale to gain input from their stakeholders on the effectiveness of the ideas and continued adapting the ideas using ongoing small tests of change until the improvement is ready to be fully implemented. The results have been higher levels of safety and reliability for patients (53% decrease in falls), increased patient centeredness (nearly 5-fold increase in patient satisfaction), enhanced vitality of the care team (25% reduction in turnover) and increased levels of value-added time spent by staff in the care of patients. Collaboration of the entire care team on the unit has also been enhanced, as evidenced by the successful implementation of quiet time on the unit; an initiative supported by physicians, ancillary care, support departments, visitors and patients. The work of the team is now being spread to eight other units in the hospital. And the people helping facilitate the spread are the staff who led this initiative from the outset. Perhaps one of the greatest intangible benefits has been the empowerment and engagement of the staff, as evidenced by results on the NDNQI nursing satisfaction survey. This presentation will provide an overview of the various components which comprise this collaborative, lessons learned during this two-year journey, and ideas on how other institutions can take and use this model to improve their patient care environment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:35:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:35:23Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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