2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182691
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse-Physician Collaborative Communication and Patient Safety Climate
Author(s):
Boyle, Kathy
Author Details:
Kathy Boyle, RN, PhD, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado, USA, email: kathy.boyle@uch.edu
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Descriptive research regarding nurse-physician collaborative communication and safety climate will be presented. Communication scores by profession and unit type as predictors of job satisfaction and safety climate scores will be discussed; communication score differences by gender and profession will be presented. ABSTRACT: Aims: Failure of communication was reported as the major cause of sentinel events in healthcare from 1985 through 2006. Professional relationships between individual health care providers were identified as having significant effects on patient outcomes. A review of the literature showed differences in ratings of nurse-physician communication, with physicians rating communication more positively than nurses. The fact that most studies regarding nurse-physician communication had occurred in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and that the majority of patients in hospitals were cared for in non-ICU units supported the need for research in non-ICU settings. The purpose of the study was to conduct survey research to assess differences in communication scores between professions (nurses and physicians), between participant unit type, to determine interaction effects based on profession and participant unit type, and to analyze communication scores as predictors of job satisfaction and safety climate scores. Methods: A descriptive study design was utilized to survey nurses and physicians from ICU and non-ICU environments. An instrument developed by Shortell and Rousseau (1989) was utilized to measure job satisfaction and caregiver interaction, a composite concept including culture, leadership, communication, problem-solving/conflict management, and coordination. A safety climate survey (Sexton & Thomas, 2003) was utilized to measure perceived organizational commitment to safety. Results: Significant communication score variance was accounted for by the main effect of profession. Physicians rated communication higher than nurses in ICU and non-ICU units. The highest nurse and physician scores were in non-ICU units. Participant unit type test results and the interaction of profession and participant unit type test results were non-significant. Combined nurse-physician caregiver interaction scores were significant predictors of job satisfaction and safety climate. Conclusion: Additional research is needed to understand score variances between the professions and between ICU and non-ICU units. Exploratory findings that job satisfaction was more strongly related to communication scores for nurses than for physicians and that male nurses had the lowest ratings of communication between nurses and physicians need to be validated in future research. REFERENCES: References Aiken, L.H., Smith, H.L., & Lake, E.T. (1994). Lower Medicare mortality among a set of hospitals known for good nursing care. Medical Care 32(8): 771-787. American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Website [online] available: http://www.aacn.org 7/02/2006. American Medical Association Website [online] available: http://www.ama-assn.org 11/21/2005. American Nurses Association Nursing's Social Policy Statement (2003) 2nd Edition, nursebooks.org, the publishing company of ANA. American Nurses Credentialing Organization Website [online] available: http://www.nursingworld.org/ancc/magnet 7/02/06. Anderson, A. (1996). Nurse-physician interaction and job satisfaction. Nursing Management, 27(6), 34-36. Anderson, F. D., Maloney, J.P. & Oliver, D.L. (1996). Nurse-physician communication: Perceptions of nurses at an army medical center. Military Medicine, 161(7), 411-415. Baggs, J. D. (1994). Development of an instrument to measure collaboration and satisfaction about care decision. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 20, 176-182. Baggs, J., Ryan, S., Phelps, C., Richeson, J., & Johnson, J. (1992). The association between interdisciplinary collaboration and patient outcomes in a medical intensive care unit. Health & Lung, 21(1), 18-24. Baggs, J.G. & Schmitt, M.H. (1988). Collaboration between nurses and physicians. IMAGE: Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 20(3), 145-149. Baggs, J.G. & Schmitt, M.H. (1997). Nurses' and resident physicians' perceptions of the process of collaboration in an MICU. Research in Nursing & Health, 20, 71-80. Baggs, J.G., Schmitt, M.H., Mushlin, A.I., Mitchell, P.H., Eldredge, D.H., Oakes, D., & Hutson, A.D. (1999). Association between nurse-physician collaboration and patient outcomes in three intensive care units. Critical Care Medicine. 27: 9, 1991-1998. Bellomo, R., Goldsmith, D., Uchino S., Buckmaster, J., Hart, G., Opdam, H., Silvester, W., Doolan, L., & Gutteridge, G. (2004). Prospective controlled trial of effect of medical emergency team on postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. Critical Care Medicine, 32(4), 916-921. Blake, R.R. & Mouton, J.S. (1970). The fifth achievement. Journal of Behavioral Science, 6, 414-426. Boyle, D.K. & Kochinda, C. (2004). Enhancing collaborative communication of nurse and physicians leadership in two intensive care units. Journal of Nursing Administration, 34 (2), 60-70. Boyle, K. A. (2005). Concept analysis: Nurse-physician collaborative communication. Unpublished manuscript. Boyle, K. A., Kendall-Gallagher, D., & Trujillo, M. (2005) Brooks, D. J. (2002). Rating the ethics of medical professionals. The Gallop Poll [online] available: http://www.poll.gallup.com 12/17/02 Buerhaus, P. (2004). Lucian leape on patient safety in U.S. hospitals. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 36(4), 366-370. Burke, K. (1969) A rhetoric of motives. University of California Press, Berkeley, California. Cadogan, M. P., Franzi, C., Osterweil, D. & Hill, T. (1999). Barriers to effective communication in skilled nursing facilities: Differences in perception between nurses and physicians. Journal of American Geriatrics Society. 47, 71-75. Coeling, H.V.E. & Cukr, P.L. (2000). Communication styles that promote perceptions of collaboration, quality, and nurse satisfaction. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 14(2), 63 - 74. Coeling H & Wilcox J. (1994). Steps to collaboration. Nursing Admin Quarterly, 18(4): 44-55. Dechairo-Marino, A.E., Jordan-Marsh, M., Traiger, G., & Saulo, M. (2001). Nurse/physician collaboration: Action research and the lessons learned. Journal of Nursing Administration, 31(5), 223-232. Epsin, S. L. & Lingard, L. A. (2001). Time as a catalyst for tension in nurse-surgeon communication. AORN Journal 74(5) p. 672-682. Erickson, J. I., H.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse-Physician Collaborative Communication and Patient Safety Climateen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Kathyen_US
dc.author.detailsKathy Boyle, RN, PhD, University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado, USA, email: kathy.boyle@uch.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182691-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Descriptive research regarding nurse-physician collaborative communication and safety climate will be presented. Communication scores by profession and unit type as predictors of job satisfaction and safety climate scores will be discussed; communication score differences by gender and profession will be presented. ABSTRACT: Aims: Failure of communication was reported as the major cause of sentinel events in healthcare from 1985 through 2006. Professional relationships between individual health care providers were identified as having significant effects on patient outcomes. A review of the literature showed differences in ratings of nurse-physician communication, with physicians rating communication more positively than nurses. The fact that most studies regarding nurse-physician communication had occurred in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) and that the majority of patients in hospitals were cared for in non-ICU units supported the need for research in non-ICU settings. The purpose of the study was to conduct survey research to assess differences in communication scores between professions (nurses and physicians), between participant unit type, to determine interaction effects based on profession and participant unit type, and to analyze communication scores as predictors of job satisfaction and safety climate scores. Methods: A descriptive study design was utilized to survey nurses and physicians from ICU and non-ICU environments. An instrument developed by Shortell and Rousseau (1989) was utilized to measure job satisfaction and caregiver interaction, a composite concept including culture, leadership, communication, problem-solving/conflict management, and coordination. A safety climate survey (Sexton & Thomas, 2003) was utilized to measure perceived organizational commitment to safety. Results: Significant communication score variance was accounted for by the main effect of profession. Physicians rated communication higher than nurses in ICU and non-ICU units. The highest nurse and physician scores were in non-ICU units. Participant unit type test results and the interaction of profession and participant unit type test results were non-significant. Combined nurse-physician caregiver interaction scores were significant predictors of job satisfaction and safety climate. Conclusion: Additional research is needed to understand score variances between the professions and between ICU and non-ICU units. Exploratory findings that job satisfaction was more strongly related to communication scores for nurses than for physicians and that male nurses had the lowest ratings of communication between nurses and physicians need to be validated in future research. REFERENCES: References Aiken, L.H., Smith, H.L., & Lake, E.T. (1994). Lower Medicare mortality among a set of hospitals known for good nursing care. Medical Care 32(8): 771-787. American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Website [online] available: http://www.aacn.org 7/02/2006. American Medical Association Website [online] available: http://www.ama-assn.org 11/21/2005. American Nurses Association Nursing's Social Policy Statement (2003) 2nd Edition, nursebooks.org, the publishing company of ANA. American Nurses Credentialing Organization Website [online] available: http://www.nursingworld.org/ancc/magnet 7/02/06. Anderson, A. (1996). Nurse-physician interaction and job satisfaction. Nursing Management, 27(6), 34-36. Anderson, F. D., Maloney, J.P. & Oliver, D.L. (1996). Nurse-physician communication: Perceptions of nurses at an army medical center. Military Medicine, 161(7), 411-415. Baggs, J. D. (1994). Development of an instrument to measure collaboration and satisfaction about care decision. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 20, 176-182. Baggs, J., Ryan, S., Phelps, C., Richeson, J., & Johnson, J. (1992). The association between interdisciplinary collaboration and patient outcomes in a medical intensive care unit. Health & Lung, 21(1), 18-24. Baggs, J.G. & Schmitt, M.H. (1988). Collaboration between nurses and physicians. IMAGE: Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 20(3), 145-149. Baggs, J.G. & Schmitt, M.H. (1997). Nurses' and resident physicians' perceptions of the process of collaboration in an MICU. Research in Nursing & Health, 20, 71-80. Baggs, J.G., Schmitt, M.H., Mushlin, A.I., Mitchell, P.H., Eldredge, D.H., Oakes, D., & Hutson, A.D. (1999). Association between nurse-physician collaboration and patient outcomes in three intensive care units. Critical Care Medicine. 27: 9, 1991-1998. Bellomo, R., Goldsmith, D., Uchino S., Buckmaster, J., Hart, G., Opdam, H., Silvester, W., Doolan, L., & Gutteridge, G. (2004). Prospective controlled trial of effect of medical emergency team on postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. Critical Care Medicine, 32(4), 916-921. Blake, R.R. & Mouton, J.S. (1970). The fifth achievement. Journal of Behavioral Science, 6, 414-426. Boyle, D.K. & Kochinda, C. (2004). Enhancing collaborative communication of nurse and physicians leadership in two intensive care units. Journal of Nursing Administration, 34 (2), 60-70. Boyle, K. A. (2005). Concept analysis: Nurse-physician collaborative communication. Unpublished manuscript. Boyle, K. A., Kendall-Gallagher, D., & Trujillo, M. (2005) Brooks, D. J. (2002). Rating the ethics of medical professionals. The Gallop Poll [online] available: http://www.poll.gallup.com 12/17/02 Buerhaus, P. (2004). Lucian leape on patient safety in U.S. hospitals. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 36(4), 366-370. Burke, K. (1969) A rhetoric of motives. University of California Press, Berkeley, California. Cadogan, M. P., Franzi, C., Osterweil, D. & Hill, T. (1999). Barriers to effective communication in skilled nursing facilities: Differences in perception between nurses and physicians. Journal of American Geriatrics Society. 47, 71-75. Coeling, H.V.E. & Cukr, P.L. (2000). Communication styles that promote perceptions of collaboration, quality, and nurse satisfaction. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 14(2), 63 - 74. Coeling H & Wilcox J. (1994). Steps to collaboration. Nursing Admin Quarterly, 18(4): 44-55. Dechairo-Marino, A.E., Jordan-Marsh, M., Traiger, G., & Saulo, M. (2001). Nurse/physician collaboration: Action research and the lessons learned. Journal of Nursing Administration, 31(5), 223-232. Epsin, S. L. & Lingard, L. A. (2001). Time as a catalyst for tension in nurse-surgeon communication. AORN Journal 74(5) p. 672-682. Erickson, J. I., H.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:35:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:35:41Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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