2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182696
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Infusing Evidence into the Policy Review Process
Author(s):
Brown, Terri
Author Details:
Terri Brown, MSN, RN, CPN, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: tlbrown@texaschildrens.org
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Learn how Evidence-based Practice Scholars have been a catalyst for changing culture by integrating evidence into policies. More than a dozen clinical examples will illustrate the program content, process and tools. ABSTRACT: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is integral to optimal patient outcomes. However, many organizations struggle to create structures that ensure evidence as a foundation for patient care policies. One tertiary care children's hospital has created a committee structure, EBP Leadership Group, and an EBP Scholars program that is the catalyst for changing the organization's culture to one that promotes integration of evidence into care provided by bedside nurses. The EBP Scholars program serves as the backbone for infusing evidence into patient care by helping clinicians develop skills to conduct evaluations of existing evidence on pediatric topics. Nurses and allied health staff work in teams on policies and projects to find, evaluate, and synthesize evidence into practice recommendations and policies. Faculty from the Center for Research and EBP provide course lectures and guide mentors. A mentor works with each team in small group sessions to focus on applying lecture content to the project. Teams are provided project time for lectures, small group work and individual work. The course includes EBP essentials of topic and question development, search strategy, search sources, critical appraisal of evidence, stakeholder involvement, practice recommendations, policy revision, presentation, and effective practice change strategies. Tools of the Scholars program include a search source worksheet, critical appraisal guides, and templates for literature reviews, evidence summaries, presentations, and professional posters. One of the more than a dozen examples illustrating the content, process and tools of the EBP Scholars program is that of monitoring children receiving patient-controlled analgesia. The impetus for change was the safety alert issued by the Joint Commission and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. Monitoring modality, criteria, and youngest age were all revised based on evidence. Staff gained an appreciation for quasi-regulatory agency initiatives, pediatric considerations, and the impact of evidence of varying levels on organizational policies. To date, 122 EBP Scholars have updated 49 policies and completed five projects. Over 70 EBP summaries have been developed. Scholars continue to use the fundamentals of EBP throughout their practice and in unit initiatives. This program has resulted in cultural changes within the organization that provide tremendous support for continued participation in EBP of staff throughout the institution. REFERENCES: Benner, P. (1984) From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice. Menlo Park: Addison-Wesley. Bethel C. (2000). Patient-centered care measures for the national health care quality report. Foundation for Accountability, Portland Or. Hallas D. & Melnyk B. M. (2003). Evidence-based practice: The paradigm shift. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 17(1), 46-49. Institute of Medicine (2000). Crossing the Quality Chasm, Library of Congress, Washington DC. Kotter J.P & Cohen D.S. (2002). The heart of change. Real-life stories of how people change their organizations. Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Melnyk B. M. & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2005). Evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare: A guide to best practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Rosswurm M.A. & Larrabee J.H. (1999). A model for change to evidence-based practice. Image-The Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 31(4), 317-322. Rycroft-Malone J, Harvey G, Seers K, et al. (2004). An exploration of the factors that influence the implementation of evidence into practice. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 13, 913-924. Rycroft-Malone J, Kitson A, Harvey G, et al. (2002). Ingredients for change: Revisiting a conceptual framework. Qual Saf Health Care, 11, 174-180. Titler M.G., Kleiber C., Steelman V., et al. (2001). The Iowa model of evidence-based practice to promote quality care. Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America, 13(4), 497-509.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfusing Evidence into the Policy Review Processen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Terrien_US
dc.author.detailsTerri Brown, MSN, RN, CPN, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: tlbrown@texaschildrens.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182696-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Learn how Evidence-based Practice Scholars have been a catalyst for changing culture by integrating evidence into policies. More than a dozen clinical examples will illustrate the program content, process and tools. ABSTRACT: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is integral to optimal patient outcomes. However, many organizations struggle to create structures that ensure evidence as a foundation for patient care policies. One tertiary care children's hospital has created a committee structure, EBP Leadership Group, and an EBP Scholars program that is the catalyst for changing the organization's culture to one that promotes integration of evidence into care provided by bedside nurses. The EBP Scholars program serves as the backbone for infusing evidence into patient care by helping clinicians develop skills to conduct evaluations of existing evidence on pediatric topics. Nurses and allied health staff work in teams on policies and projects to find, evaluate, and synthesize evidence into practice recommendations and policies. Faculty from the Center for Research and EBP provide course lectures and guide mentors. A mentor works with each team in small group sessions to focus on applying lecture content to the project. Teams are provided project time for lectures, small group work and individual work. The course includes EBP essentials of topic and question development, search strategy, search sources, critical appraisal of evidence, stakeholder involvement, practice recommendations, policy revision, presentation, and effective practice change strategies. Tools of the Scholars program include a search source worksheet, critical appraisal guides, and templates for literature reviews, evidence summaries, presentations, and professional posters. One of the more than a dozen examples illustrating the content, process and tools of the EBP Scholars program is that of monitoring children receiving patient-controlled analgesia. The impetus for change was the safety alert issued by the Joint Commission and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. Monitoring modality, criteria, and youngest age were all revised based on evidence. Staff gained an appreciation for quasi-regulatory agency initiatives, pediatric considerations, and the impact of evidence of varying levels on organizational policies. To date, 122 EBP Scholars have updated 49 policies and completed five projects. Over 70 EBP summaries have been developed. Scholars continue to use the fundamentals of EBP throughout their practice and in unit initiatives. This program has resulted in cultural changes within the organization that provide tremendous support for continued participation in EBP of staff throughout the institution. REFERENCES: Benner, P. (1984) From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice. Menlo Park: Addison-Wesley. Bethel C. (2000). Patient-centered care measures for the national health care quality report. Foundation for Accountability, Portland Or. Hallas D. & Melnyk B. M. (2003). Evidence-based practice: The paradigm shift. Journal of Pediatric Health Care, 17(1), 46-49. Institute of Medicine (2000). Crossing the Quality Chasm, Library of Congress, Washington DC. Kotter J.P & Cohen D.S. (2002). The heart of change. Real-life stories of how people change their organizations. Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Melnyk B. M. & Fineout-Overholt, E. (2005). Evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare: A guide to best practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Rosswurm M.A. & Larrabee J.H. (1999). A model for change to evidence-based practice. Image-The Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 31(4), 317-322. Rycroft-Malone J, Harvey G, Seers K, et al. (2004). An exploration of the factors that influence the implementation of evidence into practice. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 13, 913-924. Rycroft-Malone J, Kitson A, Harvey G, et al. (2002). Ingredients for change: Revisiting a conceptual framework. Qual Saf Health Care, 11, 174-180. Titler M.G., Kleiber C., Steelman V., et al. (2001). The Iowa model of evidence-based practice to promote quality care. Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America, 13(4), 497-509.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:35:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:35:57Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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