2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182698
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bullying, Harassment and Horizontal Violence in Magnet Facilities: An Oxymoron?
Author(s):
Budin, Wendy; Vessey, Judith
Author Details:
Wendy Budin, PhD, RN, BC, NYU Medical Center, New York, New York, USA, email: wendy.budin@nyumc.org; Judith Vessey, PhD, MBA, FAAN, Boston College
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will describe bullying, harassment and horizontal violence (BHHV) experienced by nurses and propose a model depicting how Forces of Magnetism associated with a healthy work environment may reduces vulnerability to BHHV and lead to positive outcomes. ABSTRACT: Respectful, collaborative working relationships among nurses and other health care professionals are essential for a healthy work environment. When open exchange of health care information is jeopardized though negative or hostile interaction among members of the health care team it leaves patients vulnerable to adverse outcomes. In today's increasingly complex and stressful health care settings it is essential that we identify situations where deteriorating staff interactions creates vulnerability for a culture that tolerates bullying, harassment, or horizontal violence (BHHV). Purpose: To describe BHHV experienced by nurses and to propose a model depicting how "Forces of Magnetism" associated with a healthy work environment may reduces vulnerability to BHHV and lead to positive outcomes. Methodology: A nationwide anonymous Internet study that investigated RNs' experiences with BHHV confirmed that BHHV exists in nursing workplaces. An aim of this survey was to focus the analysis on self-reporting subgroups and specific categorical data that may mediate the experience of BHHV. Results: Staff nurses (n=212) as a subset of the total sample (n=303) reported that bullying occurs frequently. The highest areas of reported BHHV were medical-surgical, critical care, ED, OR/PACU, and OB units. Areas that had low frequency of reported bullying were outpatient areas, diagnostic centers, psychiatric units, and the NICU. Types of bullying included public humiliation, excessive criticism, isolation, and gossiping. The staff nurse respondents described their stress levels as moderate or severe when bullied (90%, n=191). Symptoms that pervaded the workplace and consequently their interactions with patients included increased anxiety, irritability, depression, loss of concentration, change in sleep patterns, stress headaches or GI symptoms, and suicide ideation. Many staff nurses chose not to find help within their workplace because the perpetrators were often in positions of authority or there was no infrastructure or policy to help them. Many left the workplace. Implications: A model is proposed to articulate how by fueling the "Forces of Magnetism" can promote an organizational culture leading to a healthy work environment characterized by effective communication, collaborative relationships, and positive outcome. This kind of environment is inconsistent with one that promotes or tolerates BHHV.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBullying, Harassment and Horizontal Violence in Magnet Facilities: An Oxymoron?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBudin, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.authorVessey, Judithen_US
dc.author.detailsWendy Budin, PhD, RN, BC, NYU Medical Center, New York, New York, USA, email: wendy.budin@nyumc.org; Judith Vessey, PhD, MBA, FAAN, Boston Collegeen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182698-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This session will describe bullying, harassment and horizontal violence (BHHV) experienced by nurses and propose a model depicting how Forces of Magnetism associated with a healthy work environment may reduces vulnerability to BHHV and lead to positive outcomes. ABSTRACT: Respectful, collaborative working relationships among nurses and other health care professionals are essential for a healthy work environment. When open exchange of health care information is jeopardized though negative or hostile interaction among members of the health care team it leaves patients vulnerable to adverse outcomes. In today's increasingly complex and stressful health care settings it is essential that we identify situations where deteriorating staff interactions creates vulnerability for a culture that tolerates bullying, harassment, or horizontal violence (BHHV). Purpose: To describe BHHV experienced by nurses and to propose a model depicting how "Forces of Magnetism" associated with a healthy work environment may reduces vulnerability to BHHV and lead to positive outcomes. Methodology: A nationwide anonymous Internet study that investigated RNs' experiences with BHHV confirmed that BHHV exists in nursing workplaces. An aim of this survey was to focus the analysis on self-reporting subgroups and specific categorical data that may mediate the experience of BHHV. Results: Staff nurses (n=212) as a subset of the total sample (n=303) reported that bullying occurs frequently. The highest areas of reported BHHV were medical-surgical, critical care, ED, OR/PACU, and OB units. Areas that had low frequency of reported bullying were outpatient areas, diagnostic centers, psychiatric units, and the NICU. Types of bullying included public humiliation, excessive criticism, isolation, and gossiping. The staff nurse respondents described their stress levels as moderate or severe when bullied (90%, n=191). Symptoms that pervaded the workplace and consequently their interactions with patients included increased anxiety, irritability, depression, loss of concentration, change in sleep patterns, stress headaches or GI symptoms, and suicide ideation. Many staff nurses chose not to find help within their workplace because the perpetrators were often in positions of authority or there was no infrastructure or policy to help them. Many left the workplace. Implications: A model is proposed to articulate how by fueling the "Forces of Magnetism" can promote an organizational culture leading to a healthy work environment characterized by effective communication, collaborative relationships, and positive outcome. This kind of environment is inconsistent with one that promotes or tolerates BHHV.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:36:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:36:03Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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