2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182702
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlation of Capillary vs. Arterial Blood Glucose in the ICU
Author(s):
Cadden, Kathy; Yee, Cathy; Ryan, Donna; Pharris, Judy
Author Details:
Kathy Cadden, BSN, CCRN, RN, Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, Mission Hills, California, USA, email: Kathy.cadden@providence.org; Cathy Yee, RN, MSN; Donna Ryan, RN(IP), RD, CDE, MS; Judy Pharris RN, BSN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Finger-stick capillary blood is often used interchangeably with arterial blood samples in the critical care patient with no clear data on correlation between the two samples in this population. A study was conducted to provide evidence for this nursing practice in the critical care unit. ABSTRACT: Problem: Capillary blood glucose has been shown to closely correlate with systemic arterial blood glucose under steady-state conditions. Literature is limited regarding such a correlation in the critical care patient population. Background: The use of continuous intravenous insulin infusions to control hyperglycemia in critical illness is rapidly becoming the standard of practice in intensive care units across the country. Protocols are utilizing hourly, or more frequent, point of care testing for insulin titrations. Finger-stick capillary blood is often used interchangeably with arterial blood samples in the critical care patient with no clear data on correlation between the two samples in this population. Objective: This study was conducted to determine the correlation between capillary blood glucose levels obtained by the finger-stick method and arterial blood glucose sampling at the bedside for the critical care patient. It was hypothesized that there would be a significant correlation between arterial blood glucose and capillary fingerstick blood glucose in the critically ill adult patient population. Method: Twenty-eight critically ill post-cardiovascular surgery patients were consented and enrolled in a three month study. Simultaneous bedside capillary blood glucose measurements and arterial blood glucose measurements were performed. A total of 790 blood glucose point-of-care tests were performed consisting of 495 sets of fingerstick capillary and arterial blood samples. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed using SPSS 15.0. Additional variables were assessed including mean arterial pressure, pulse oximetry readings, temperature, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and use of vasoactive medications. Results: A significant correlation exists between fingerstick capillary and arterial blood glucose levels in the critically ill patient population (p < .01; n = 495). Correlation between capillary and arterial blood glucose within each individual was also significant (p < .01; n = 28). There was not a significant correlation between either of the blood glucose sources and hemoglobin or hematocrit levels, temperature, or use of vasoactive drug infusions. A weak, but significant correlation exists between both the capillary blood (.115) and arterial blood (.120) and pulse oximetry levels. Conclusion: This study supports the use of arterial blood for point of care glucose testing in a critical care population.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelation of Capillary vs. Arterial Blood Glucose in the ICUen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCadden, Kathyen_US
dc.contributor.authorYee, Cathyen_US
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPharris, Judyen_US
dc.author.detailsKathy Cadden, BSN, CCRN, RN, Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, Mission Hills, California, USA, email: Kathy.cadden@providence.org; Cathy Yee, RN, MSN; Donna Ryan, RN(IP), RD, CDE, MS; Judy Pharris RN, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182702-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Finger-stick capillary blood is often used interchangeably with arterial blood samples in the critical care patient with no clear data on correlation between the two samples in this population. A study was conducted to provide evidence for this nursing practice in the critical care unit. ABSTRACT: Problem: Capillary blood glucose has been shown to closely correlate with systemic arterial blood glucose under steady-state conditions. Literature is limited regarding such a correlation in the critical care patient population. Background: The use of continuous intravenous insulin infusions to control hyperglycemia in critical illness is rapidly becoming the standard of practice in intensive care units across the country. Protocols are utilizing hourly, or more frequent, point of care testing for insulin titrations. Finger-stick capillary blood is often used interchangeably with arterial blood samples in the critical care patient with no clear data on correlation between the two samples in this population. Objective: This study was conducted to determine the correlation between capillary blood glucose levels obtained by the finger-stick method and arterial blood glucose sampling at the bedside for the critical care patient. It was hypothesized that there would be a significant correlation between arterial blood glucose and capillary fingerstick blood glucose in the critically ill adult patient population. Method: Twenty-eight critically ill post-cardiovascular surgery patients were consented and enrolled in a three month study. Simultaneous bedside capillary blood glucose measurements and arterial blood glucose measurements were performed. A total of 790 blood glucose point-of-care tests were performed consisting of 495 sets of fingerstick capillary and arterial blood samples. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed using SPSS 15.0. Additional variables were assessed including mean arterial pressure, pulse oximetry readings, temperature, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and use of vasoactive medications. Results: A significant correlation exists between fingerstick capillary and arterial blood glucose levels in the critically ill patient population (p &lt; .01; n = 495). Correlation between capillary and arterial blood glucose within each individual was also significant (p &lt; .01; n = 28). There was not a significant correlation between either of the blood glucose sources and hemoglobin or hematocrit levels, temperature, or use of vasoactive drug infusions. A weak, but significant correlation exists between both the capillary blood (.115) and arterial blood (.120) and pulse oximetry levels. Conclusion: This study supports the use of arterial blood for point of care glucose testing in a critical care population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:36:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:36:15Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.