2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182705
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Sweet Are You?
Author(s):
Cartwright, Stacie; Koesler, Allison
Author Details:
Stacie Cartwright, Integris Southwest Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: s.cartwright@integrishealth.com; Allison Koesler
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: OBJECTIVES: Identify Acute Ischemic Stroke patients who have not been diagnosed with diabetes prior to hospitalization. Identify Acute Ischemic Stroke patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes prior to hospitalization. To get an average of the finger stick blood glucose levels in diabetic patients that are admitted with an Acute Ischemic Stroke. To control finger stick blood glucose levels with insulin in the Acute Ischemic Stroke patient. PROBLEMS AND RATIONALES: Hyperglycemia in an Acute Ischemic Stroke increases the cerebral infarct size and subsequently worsens the neurological outcomes and affects the rate of recovery, therefore increases the hospital stay. An investigation found that there were a large percentage of our patients who were admitted to the Stroke Unit were either known diabetics or people who presented with high glucose levels that were not officially diagnosed with diabetes. There was a big concern to get all patients with high glucose levels under control. Our Stroke program decided to focus on achieving tighter glucose control by increasing testing frequency and the use of sliding scale insulin. Patients admitted with the diagnosis of Acute Ischemic Stroke would have their finger stick blood glucose levels checked. METHODOLOGY: All patients admitted with the diagnosis of Stroke will receive finger stick blood glucose levels checked every six hours for the fist twenty-four hours with or without the recommended sliding scale insulin to cover. If the patient has persistently elevated glucose levels or is a previously diagnosed diabetic, the testing and coverage will continue on a before meal and at bedtime regimen. CONCLUSION: Since the implementation of the Hyperglycemia Management Protocol and the change in our Acute Ischemic Stroke order sets, we have seen a 15% decrease in the mean average finger stick blood glucose levels in the stroke patients and the nurses are demonstrating a heightened awareness of...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: L.S. Williams, MD; S. Rotich, PhD; R. Qi; MS; N Fineberg, PhD; A. Espay MD; A. Bruno, MD; S.E. Fineberg, MD; & W.R. Fienney, MD. Effects of admission hyperglycemia on mortality and costs in acute ischemic stroke. AAN enterprises Inc. 2002. Nader Antonios, MD; & Scott Sillimon, MD. Diabetes Mellitus and Stroke. Northeast Florida Medicine Spring 2005. Askiel Bruno, MD; Linda S. Williams, MD & Thomas A. Kent, MD. How important is hyperglycemia during acute brain infarction? The neurologist Volume 10, number 4, July 2004.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Sweet Are You?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCartwright, Stacieen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoesler, Allisonen_US
dc.author.detailsStacie Cartwright, Integris Southwest Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: s.cartwright@integrishealth.com; Allison Koesleren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182705-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: OBJECTIVES: Identify Acute Ischemic Stroke patients who have not been diagnosed with diabetes prior to hospitalization. Identify Acute Ischemic Stroke patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes prior to hospitalization. To get an average of the finger stick blood glucose levels in diabetic patients that are admitted with an Acute Ischemic Stroke. To control finger stick blood glucose levels with insulin in the Acute Ischemic Stroke patient. PROBLEMS AND RATIONALES: Hyperglycemia in an Acute Ischemic Stroke increases the cerebral infarct size and subsequently worsens the neurological outcomes and affects the rate of recovery, therefore increases the hospital stay. An investigation found that there were a large percentage of our patients who were admitted to the Stroke Unit were either known diabetics or people who presented with high glucose levels that were not officially diagnosed with diabetes. There was a big concern to get all patients with high glucose levels under control. Our Stroke program decided to focus on achieving tighter glucose control by increasing testing frequency and the use of sliding scale insulin. Patients admitted with the diagnosis of Acute Ischemic Stroke would have their finger stick blood glucose levels checked. METHODOLOGY: All patients admitted with the diagnosis of Stroke will receive finger stick blood glucose levels checked every six hours for the fist twenty-four hours with or without the recommended sliding scale insulin to cover. If the patient has persistently elevated glucose levels or is a previously diagnosed diabetic, the testing and coverage will continue on a before meal and at bedtime regimen. CONCLUSION: Since the implementation of the Hyperglycemia Management Protocol and the change in our Acute Ischemic Stroke order sets, we have seen a 15% decrease in the mean average finger stick blood glucose levels in the stroke patients and the nurses are demonstrating a heightened awareness of...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: L.S. Williams, MD; S. Rotich, PhD; R. Qi; MS; N Fineberg, PhD; A. Espay MD; A. Bruno, MD; S.E. Fineberg, MD; & W.R. Fienney, MD. Effects of admission hyperglycemia on mortality and costs in acute ischemic stroke. AAN enterprises Inc. 2002. Nader Antonios, MD; & Scott Sillimon, MD. Diabetes Mellitus and Stroke. Northeast Florida Medicine Spring 2005. Askiel Bruno, MD; Linda S. Williams, MD & Thomas A. Kent, MD. How important is hyperglycemia during acute brain infarction? The neurologist Volume 10, number 4, July 2004.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:36:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:36:24Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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